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Arrow selection

Duck_Slam123Duck_Slam123 South Florida Posts: 62 Deckhand
Hey everyone I need some help I’m shooting my bow draw weight 55-60 and draw length is 27.5. I been shooting carbon arrows 400 spine and 100 grain arrow heads. My uncle was a big bow hunter and shot aluminum arrows and had him hundreds of arrows around 30-27.7inches. They are Easton lite 2213 and I looked it up and at my poundage I can shoot the 2213 and I did. At about 30-35 yds they group really good at 40 it wasn’t bad either and I haven’t tried any further. Could I hunt with these arrows? What are the pros and cons of hunting aluminum arrows? Also do anyone got any recommendations of carbon arrows to buy the ones I originally bought grouped good but the knocks were falling right off them? 
Thank you Jay

Replies

  • James243James243 Posts: 843 Officer
    Nothing wrong with aluminum. I shoot Easton 2315 for my recurve and the same arrow shoots great in my compound, just slower than my carbons due to the higher weight. I carry one in my quiver and it’s first out when I’m expecting a 20 yard or less shot.  With a two blade Zwickey Eskimo on the front it’s ready to do business over and over again. I practice with a dull head and I have dug it out of the ground and a board fence more than I can count and it still flies true. 

    Pros are they may shoot really well for you and don’t cost as much. Bent ones can be fixed up to make flu flus or arrows worthy of a hog. Cons are that they can bend and you can’t make them perfect again. 

    The ones you have are more on the thin wall side, so they may not be super tough. First two numbers are for the diameter and second two are wall thickness. The combination of the two produce different spines. Aluminum has more spine options and some shafts that are heavier/lighter for a given spine range. 
  • reconspecialistreconspecialist Florida Posts: 20 Deckhand
    Many animals shot with aluminum arrows and still are. I shot easton xx75 game getters for years now I shot easton hunters 2216 with feathers and will continue to. Nothing wrong with aluminum 
  • swampdogswampdog Central FloridaPosts: 4,393 Captain
    edited July 29 #4
    We killed a lot of deer and hogs with aluminum and even wooden arrows before carbon was an option. I have a quiver of XX75s that I used to shoot from a Bear recurve. Good luck duckslam!
  • WildManWildMan Posts: 335 Deckhand
    edited July 29 #5
    As others said they will definitely work.  I shot them out of my compound for years and still shoot them with my recurves and longbow.  Fletching can be important. Feather fletching tends to be more forgiving depending on arrow rest type but need to periodically waterproof the feathers.  Also, longer fletching will help stabilize the arrow if bow is not perfectly tuned.  As mentioned, alum. arrows will shoot slower so will have more drop, but tend to have more weight that offsets slower speed with increased energy. Also there can be more variation between arrows so I recommend putting a number on each arrow so you can group those that are most consistent.  Lastly, be sure to shoot some broadheads prior to hunting as they may fly different than the field tips so you may need to make adjustments. Make sure the broadheads are razor sharp before hunting.

    Good luck and keep at it as it takes time to hone your skills, but recognize that hunting public land in Florida can be a challenge. 
  • Crkr23Crkr23 MelrosePosts: 480 Deckhand
    I've killed a pile of deer with 2213's back in the 80's, shot them up to 75#'s @ 31" and they worked great. In my misguided youth we wanted arrows as light as possible to compensate for miscalculations in range. Now that we have rangefinders to take care of that problem, allowing us to shoot heavier more efficient arrows.
    If your arrow nocks are loose you can shim them with plastic or glue them. To shim them, remove the nock, hold a piece of plastic bread sack over the end of the arrow and push the nock back in. Remove the excess plastic,if you can't get all the excess off just singe it with a lighter.
  • Duck_Slam123Duck_Slam123 South Florida Posts: 62 Deckhand
    WildMan said:
    As others said they will definitely work.  I shot them out of my compound for years and still shoot them with my recurves and longbow.  Fletching can be important. Feather fletching tends to be more forgiving depending on arrow rest type but need to periodically waterproof the feathers.  Also, longer fletching will help stabilize the arrow if bow is not perfectly tuned.  As mentioned, alum. arrows will shoot slower so will have more drop, but tend to have more weight that offsets slower speed with increased energy. Also there can be more variation between arrows so I recommend putting a number on each arrow so you can group those that are most consistent.  Lastly, be sure to shoot some broadheads prior to hunting as they may fly different than the field tips so you may need to make adjustments. Make sure the broadheads are razor sharp before hunting.

    Good luck and keep at it as it takes time to hone your skills, but recognize that hunting public land in Florida can be a challenge. 
    I was just gonna ask if there is there a specific reason there were feather fletching on all of them! Thank you
  • Duck_Slam123Duck_Slam123 South Florida Posts: 62 Deckhand
    Everyone you are all a great deal of help! I only ask because my uncle had so many aluminum arrows like hundreds my aunt didn’t know what to do with and we’re gonna to them away when he passed. I think it’s just a huge mental thing but I refuse to let her throw away anything of my uncles especially if it is fishing or hunting related. I recently got into archery hunting a year ago. If I’m honest it was never my thing but my uncle loved it so much and never had any sons or daughters to pass it along and so I took it upon myself to learn. So far I got lucky with a six point at about 15 yds on dinner island last august. Now I’m a bit hooked 😂😂 and I have broken so many carbon arrows and now I know that I don’t just have to shoot those but I could cut and refletch my uncles. Which mean a lot to me because I love using his gear to go out it reminds me of being a kid and not having any of my own and him dressing me up and handing me a gun to hunt. I appreciate you all!
    thank you Jay
  • Crkr23Crkr23 MelrosePosts: 480 Deckhand
    Feathers will generally fly broadheads better and are more forgiving with bad form and contact with the rest. Feathers are more noisy in flight than plastic vanes, kind of a roaring sound. A lot of the more modern arrow rests are drop-aways which eliminates the problem of fletching contact making plastic vanes a better option, they are waterproof and more durable than feather fletching.
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