Skip to main content
Home General Paddle Craft

How worth it is an upgrade to a pedal yak?

2»

Replies

  • Kayak_PeteKayak_Pete Posts: 184 Deckhand
    Yep, last two digits are the year.

    Does the drive on the Slayer pop out or lift?  If not, you're going to get hung up somewhere.
    It looks like the Lightning uses a Mirage Drive?

    <<I am wondering how much the ability to go backwards more quickly is worth it since this seems to not be an option with fin drives.>>
    That's why you have a paddle.  I've fished in an Outback with reverse and it was real nice for oyster beds and mangroves, but you could still back up with your paddle.

    I am really partial to the Hobie's tool trays and storage capacity.  OK, the others have slide tracks which are useful certainly, but I just don't see how you get by without the 4 tool trays and 2 mesh pockets I have.  For me, that was the necessity, along with the seat hatch tackle box.
    Yeah, my seat sorta sucks, but only because newer ones have come out in the meantime.
    A lot of cheapo "fishing" yaks have 2 rod holders and they're done.  They don't understand the equipment that needs to be both stored and easy to get to.

    Decide carefully.  We all have different needs. Make sure you address them for yourself, so you're not buying another yak in 2 years. For me the 10' Hobie was perfect in almost every way.  $1200 for a '15 Outback seems like a good bargain.

    OK Hobie commercial over.


    2014 Hobie Sport
  • bigfinn35bigfinn35 Sarasota/VenicePosts: 1,096 Officer
    edited March 2021 #33
    Pete, I was more thinking of the reverse being valuable when fighting a fish to keep myself away from structure or pull the fish out. Certainly not necessary, especially if I'm staked out with a spike anchor, but thought it was worth considering. For what it's worth, the propeller drive seems very easy to pull up and put back down again as needed.

    I'm kind of leaning towards the Strike. Comparable to the Outback in terms of storage space and stability (plus it has inbuilt padding for standing up easier), but it's by far the lightest and newest of the 3 and was kept in better conditions than the older Outback was. Reverse might be nice, but if it's a hassle to load the [email protected] thing for a trip I'm not likely to use it as much.

    Dunno why I'm stressing so much, we all know I'm gonna be a die-hard defender of whichever one I pick in order to preserve my pride!
    Paddle faster, I hear banjo music.
  • John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 3,987 Captain
    If the outback is a 2015, I would go with that.  If you decide you don't like it, it will hold it's re-sale value and you should be able to re-sell it for close to what you paid, if not the same amount.
  • quatinquatin Posts: 599 Officer
    Whatever you get, it's worth upgrading from any kind of paddle Hobie. Their hull designs are terrible to paddle and meant to be pedaled with. If I were you, I'd look into a microskiff or gheenoe combo. Solo Skiff is $2k and gheenoe is like $1.5k and you can put both in the bed of a truck. I would just suffer with the Kona for a little longer or maybe sell/trade for an Ocean Kayak. Save up your money and get something that really opens up your options.
  • scallopscallop Posts: 50 Deckhand
    I can't really comment on fishing the salt, as I am from Ohio and the only salt I get is on my vacations 2-3 times a year where I have rented yaks a couple times.  I do however fish about 3-4 days a week, sometimes more here locally from April to November.  So I do have quite a bit of water time.
    I have a 17 Outback I bought brand new, and will not ever go  back to paddle only.  For fishing there is no comparison.
    I paddled for maybe 4 yrs before I made the switch.  I finally pulled the trigger after Hobie came out with reverse after a TON of research and trials of other boats.
    I had to buy my wife a peddle yak, as after she tried mine she would not paddle again either.  I bought her a Pelican Catch.  Basically a copy of the Mirage drive, no reverse, because I was not sure how much she would use it and it was half price compared to the Hobie.  She loves it, with the exception of having no reverse.

    Notice I keep coming back to reverse.  I would not have one with forward only, been pulled into trees and brush too many times and trying to get out with a paddle, especially with a fish on is an exercise in frustration.

    I went with the Hobie over other peddle drives for it's ability to go really skinny without pulling the drive.  You can kick one peddle all the way forward and flutter kick and keep moving in some really shallow water.  The other drives extend down 18" or so and are shaped like a lower unit on an outboard, you have to pull them if going shallow.  They are also not as weed friendly as the Hobie.

    Yes Hobie is very proud of their product, but IMO it is worth the extra expense.  Easy to work on as well if you have an issue.  Only issues I have had in the 5 yrs of operation is one of the pull cords for the shifter broke (about $15 and 20 min to switch out as I had to change both to V2 versions, I have the older V1 drive) and just a couple three weeks ago did the idiot move of not pulling my fins before taking out and drug them up the ramp, bending one mast and cracking the boom.  That cost me $45 and about a half hour to replace.

    Yes the Outback is a little heavy, but goes in the back of my truck fairly easy, I use a bed extender and modified it with some rollers for easier loading.

      I like the Hobie so well that I have on order two of the new Lynx models, one for me and one for the wife, as they weigh in at 45 lbs and will be able to strap them to the RV and take them with us on road trips.


  • RStyleRStyle Posts: 1,693 Captain
    I fish on a Hobie And would never consider a non pedal kayak. 
    There is one negative that happens very rarely but that you should be aware of. Not fun when a big jack or red decides to change directions and wraps your line in those fins…………
  • RStyleRStyle Posts: 1,693 Captain
    Meaning the pedal fins sticking under the kayak……
  • Kayak_PeteKayak_Pete Posts: 184 Deckhand
    Yeah, I have tangled my fins in someone else's line and once in my own line.
    I have also had a small fish jump into my lap up thru the mirage well.  Startled the heck out of me since I wasn't fishing and it was midnight and couldn't see what was going on.  Thought I had a snake at first.
    2014 Hobie Sport
  • John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 3,987 Captain
    RStyle said:
    I fish on a Hobie And would never consider a non pedal kayak. 
    There is one negative that happens very rarely but that you should be aware of. Not fun when a big jack or red decides to change directions and wraps your line in those fins…………
    I have lost a few fish to the mirage drive, but consider it my own fault for not taking the time to pull out the drive when the fish is close to the kayak.  One time a blackfin tuna snagged a free hook on the mirage opening, and I landed the fish by pulling it through the mirage drive hole.
  • Kayak_PeteKayak_Pete Posts: 184 Deckhand
    RStyle said:
    I fish on a Hobie And would never consider a non pedal kayak. 
    There is one negative that happens very rarely but that you should be aware of. Not fun when a big jack or red decides to change directions and wraps your line in those fins…………
    I have lost a few fish to the mirage drive, but consider it my own fault for not taking the time to pull out the drive when the fish is close to the kayak.  One time a blackfin tuna snagged a free hook on the mirage opening, and I landed the fish by pulling it through the mirage drive hole.
    Criminy!  I've heard it all now!  You pulled a tuna up thru the well?!!
    Well I guess I shouldn't be that surprised, you've certainly fished enough to do some things I'd never even considered.  What a good story.

    I was pitching minnows up under some branches, caught something that dragged me toward shore, tangling my line in the branches in the process.  At the same time, I had a minnow on a line behind me, got hit and that fish too headed for shore.  I got both lines tangled in the trees, considered just cutting them and losing two fish, but managed to back out and carefully untangle everything over the next 10 minutes.  Bass and crappie.

    2014 Hobie Sport
  • John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 3,987 Captain
    RStyle said:
    I fish on a Hobie And would never consider a non pedal kayak. 
    There is one negative that happens very rarely but that you should be aware of. Not fun when a big jack or red decides to change directions and wraps your line in those fins…………
    I have lost a few fish to the mirage drive, but consider it my own fault for not taking the time to pull out the drive when the fish is close to the kayak.  One time a blackfin tuna snagged a free hook on the mirage opening, and I landed the fish by pulling it through the mirage drive hole.
    Criminy!  I've heard it all now!  You pulled a tuna up thru the well?!!
    Well I guess I shouldn't be that surprised, you've certainly fished enough to do some things I'd never even considered.  What a good story.

    I was pitching minnows up under some branches, caught something that dragged me toward shore, tangling my line in the branches in the process.  At the same time, I had a minnow on a line behind me, got hit and that fish too headed for shore.  I got both lines tangled in the trees, considered just cutting them and losing two fish, but managed to back out and carefully untangle everything over the next 10 minutes.  Bass and crappie.

    https://www.facebook.com/100007251106350/videos/2057015651216785

    Yeah, it was pretty funny.  Congrats on landing your double hook up.  It happens sometimes and it pays to be patient.  I have had some triple hook ups, but have yet to land all three.
  • Drifting_ByDrifting_By ChicagoPosts: 167 Deckhand
    Wow these new Hobies look nice, and feather light at 42 lbs! I wish it came in a 12' version and had a hatch for dry storage but this could be the one I have been waiting for.

    Hobie Mirage Lynx - FASTEST PEDAL KAYAK & UNSINKABLE? - YouTube
  • JW_YakAnglerJW_YakAngler NaplesPosts: 301 Deckhand
    I would have had zero chance of landing this fish without pedals(pedals not peddles, lol pet peeve) I leadered him several times then grasped his jaw before he shook loose and broke off. This was an accidental tarpon, but I target big snook at this location and the PDL drive was an absolute game changer. Anchoring doesn't work there because you have to cast upstream to work the jig properly, so the big fish pull you upstream right over the top of your anchor. With the pedals I can hold my position while casting and instantly back fish away from the structure after hooking up.

    My YouTube channel: JakeW KayakFishing
  • Drifting_ByDrifting_By ChicagoPosts: 167 Deckhand
    Well I finally pulled the trigger on a pedal-powered kayak. I was seriously considering the Hobie Lynx, but at the end of the day I decided I needed something a bit bigger with storage inside the hull. I considered the offerings from Old Town, Native, etc. but those all had hull weights a bit more than I felt comfortable with getting on top of mt Grand Cherokee. So... somehow the Hobie Compass had slipped under my radar. 68 lb fitted hull weight, just 5 lbs heavier than my Tarpon 120. Bare-bones but adding the rectangular hatch where the round one is and moving the round one to the front is an easy modification with great benefits. Plus the 2022 has a newly designed seat, and the seat was what people kept complaining about on the old one. So I bought a 2022 Compass in camo.

    I won't be able to pick it up until after Christmas and it will be months after that before I finally get to use it (lakes here will be frozen then!) but gives me lots of time to make my mods.

    You'd think that Chicago would have a Hobie dealer, but you'd be wrong. REI sells them but in very limited selection and they don't sell the color I wanted, and I'm not a fan of bright yellow lol. I have to drive an hour and a half to Ottawa to get mine, thus not being able to pick up until after Christmas, working 60 hour weeks until then.

    Anyway, I'm very excited to finally make the transition!
  • John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 3,987 Captain
    Well I finally pulled the trigger on a pedal-powered kayak. I was seriously considering the Hobie Lynx, but at the end of the day I decided I needed something a bit bigger with storage inside the hull. I considered the offerings from Old Town, Native, etc. but those all had hull weights a bit more than I felt comfortable with getting on top of mt Grand Cherokee. So... somehow the Hobie Compass had slipped under my radar. 68 lb fitted hull weight, just 5 lbs heavier than my Tarpon 120. Bare-bones but adding the rectangular hatch where the round one is and moving the round one to the front is an easy modification with great benefits. Plus the 2022 has a newly designed seat, and the seat was what people kept complaining about on the old one. So I bought a 2022 Compass in camo.

    I won't be able to pick it up until after Christmas and it will be months after that before I finally get to use it (lakes here will be frozen then!) but gives me lots of time to make my mods.

    You'd think that Chicago would have a Hobie dealer, but you'd be wrong. REI sells them but in very limited selection and they don't sell the color I wanted, and I'm not a fan of bright yellow lol. I have to drive an hour and a half to Ottawa to get mine, thus not being able to pick up until after Christmas, working 60 hour weeks until then.

    Anyway, I'm very excited to finally make the transition!
    Congratulations on your purchase!
  • Drifting_ByDrifting_By ChicagoPosts: 167 Deckhand
    So I was finally able to pick up my new Compass today. I had already bought a vertical rectangular hatch to put it where the round one is (and move the round one to the front) but soon realized the vertical hatch will not fit the 2022 Compass because of the redesigned seat, the front of the seat would overhang the hatch making it impossible to open. So I bought a horizontal one from the dealer instead, I'll send back the vertical hatch. I wanted the vertical one to have more foot room on the side, but the dealer assured me it's OK to stand on the hatch and indeed they seem very solidly built.

    I drove the 2 hours home just fine, but I think I'm going to ditch my existing kayak carrier on my car. It's a Malone SeaWing carrier which fit my Tarpon 120 just fine but the trimaran-style Hobie just wants to slide around on it. So now I'm thinking I'll just slide it up there and let it sit right on the crossbars... does anyone think that will be an issue?


  • John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 3,987 Captain
    So I was finally able to pick up my new Compass today. I had already bought a vertical rectangular hatch to put it where the round one is (and move the round one to the front) but soon realized the vertical hatch will not fit the 2022 Compass because of the redesigned seat, the front of the seat would overhang the hatch making it impossible to open. So I bought a horizontal one from the dealer instead, I'll send back the vertical hatch. I wanted the vertical one to have more foot room on the side, but the dealer assured me it's OK to stand on the hatch and indeed they seem very solidly built.

    I drove the 2 hours home just fine, but I think I'm going to ditch my existing kayak carrier on my car. It's a Malone SeaWing carrier which fit my Tarpon 120 just fine but the trimaran-style Hobie just wants to slide around on it. So now I'm thinking I'll just slide it up there and let it sit right on the crossbars... does anyone think that will be an issue?


    Congratulations on your new kayak!  It is hard to visualize what your saying, but across the two bars is probably ok.  Technically I think they recommend stowing upsidedown on two supports in the owner's manual.    Any other way is not recommended, but there are many who stow them right side up and have never had a problem  (myself included).  The manual recommends sliding the kayak up onto the roof racks right side up and then flipping it upside down prior to securing.  I have always slid my kayak right side up in the back of my truck for transport.
  • Drifting_ByDrifting_By ChicagoPosts: 167 Deckhand
    Congratulations on your new kayak!  It is hard to visualize what your saying, but across the two bars is probably ok.  Technically I think they recommend stowing upsidedown on two supports in the owner's manual.    Any other way is not recommended, but there are many who stow them right side up and have never had a problem  (myself included).  The manual recommends sliding the kayak up onto the roof racks right side up and then flipping it upside down prior to securing.  I have always slid my kayak right side up in the back of my truck for transport.
    Thanks for the reply John! Yes flipping it over once on top is a good idea. Should also be easier to do without the extra height the carrier added. Plus I'll be able to use drive-through car washes again! I do have to start reading that manual...
  • DES51DES51 Posts: 260 Deckhand
    Buy crossbar kayak pads, Malone sells them, or make your own with pipe insulation. It will keep the yak from sliding around. Be sure to use cam buckle straps and you should be alright.
  • Drifting_ByDrifting_By ChicagoPosts: 167 Deckhand
    DES51 said:
    Buy crossbar kayak pads, Malone sells them, or make your own with pipe insulation. It will keep the yak from sliding around. Be sure to use cam buckle straps and you should be alright.
    My Mopar crossbars have a rubber strip on top which keeps things from sliding, and I do use cam buckle straps since it's easy to make ratchet straps too tight which will warp the hull or even crack it.


  • Drifting_ByDrifting_By ChicagoPosts: 167 Deckhand
    Day 4 down here in southwest Florida with the new Compass and I absolutely love it! It's night and day compared to paddling, I spend way more time fishing instead of paddling into position. It really paid off big today when I was fishing a shoreline that a howling wind wanted to push me into, no problem in the Compass! Then I hooked a big snook and was able to move away from the mangroves so it couldn't pull me in them and break me off, and my new personal best snook was landed after a wild fight where it jumped like crazy and made many powerful runs,  it was 30". No way would I have landed that in my old kayak, it would have pulled me in and broke me off.  I also got a nice limit of trout the past few days; found them trolling which I couldn't do in the old kayak. If anyone has doubts if a pedal yak is worth it yes yes yes it is! 


  • John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 3,987 Captain
    Yeah, some on hear hate Hobies, but I am with you, pedaling is a game-changer.  Plus they hold their value for resale used while paddle kayaks are a tough resale.  Congrats on the nice Snook!
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Digital Now Included!

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

Preview This Month's Issue

Buy Digital Single Issues

Don't miss an issue.
Buy single digital issue for your phone or tablet.

Buy Single Digital Issue on the Florida Sportsman App

Other Magazines

See All Other Magazines

Special Interest Magazines

See All Special Interest Magazines

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Florida Sportsman stories delivered right to your inbox.

Advertisement

Phone Icon

Get Digital Access.

All Florida Sportsman subscribers now have digital access to their magazine content. This means you have the option to read your magazine on most popular phones and tablets.

To get started, click the link below to visit mymagnow.com and learn how to access your digital magazine.

Get Digital Access

Not a Subscriber?
Subscribe Now