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Fort Lauderdale - Afternoon Offshore drifts - March 14th + 15th, 2021

John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 3,367 Captain
Finally a break from the wind.  I did two afternoon drift trips off the beach in Fort Lauderdale to take advantage of the flat surf and low wind.

Fish were all taken on slow pitch jigs worked through the water column between 200-400ft deep.  A keeper Mutton always makes the day, nice to get one within the first 30 minutes of wetting a line.

A headboat moved in on my location, so I was displaced out a little deeper to get this doubleheader of baby Amberjacks.

No trip is complete without getting Prudential life insurance(a piece of the rock) -- Luckily this time it broke off the bottom so I did not lose my jig.

Other catches included Sand Tilefish, Little Tunny, and Blackfin Tuna



On afternoon #2, (15th) the legs were a little tired, so there was no fighting the 2kt+ current just drifting.  It was a little frustrating as I missed several good marks of fish on account of the current.

The first Blackfin I took was grabbed by something mid-depth and pulled a little extra drag before it was released.
I
This has happened to me before, and I suspect a billfish, a wahoo would have put a bigger dent, and a cuda would have been more sloppy.  Most of the drift was slow fishing because the current made it hard to hit the marks, but I still managed to get a few.

Always nice to have some fresh sushi!

Replies

  • gogittumgogittum SW New MexicoPosts: 2,214 Captain
    Pretty bad manners by that head boat, eh ??
  • John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 3,367 Captain
    gogittum said:
    Pretty bad manners by that head boat, eh ??
    I am kind of accustomed to it.  The six-pack charter boats are always crashing my spots on wrecks.  They will do a couple of drops with live gogs on super heavy gear in an attempt to yank up an Amberjack.  The worst was once a dive boat crashed my wreck... usually not too bad cause the divers can not stay down for very long before they have to come up in 200ft.  So the dive boat left about half a mile down the beach, so I thought it was safe to go back to fishing there.  Wrong!  The dive boat left divers in the water unattended!  Next thing I know I have bubbles coming up all around me.  One of the divers decided to cut off my downrigger set up ($50)!
  • Kayak_PeteKayak_Pete Posts: 184 Deckhand
    Criminy !
    Nice fish JM
    2014 Hobie Sport
  • gogittumgogittum SW New MexicoPosts: 2,214 Captain
    Dive boat left divers in the water unattended....??  That's one of the biggest sins they can commit.  If one of those divers had a problem, the skipper would be wide open to every lawsuit in the book.  We NEVER moved the boat till all were accounted for on deck.

    Wonder why that diver cut your rigging ??  Doesn't make any sense.

    Not much you can do about the manners.  Too bad....I'd be pis.s.ed, too.
  • krashkrash Posts: 764 Officer
    edited March 20 #6
    Seems to be a pretty common thing for dive boats to drop a bunch of divers and then wait for them to pop their surface buoy marker and go pick them up.

    Every year when we are, were, out there lobster diving we end up picking up one or two divers separated far from the dive boat that dropped them, many tourist panic'd waving or tryin to blow a safety whistle.. you ever try to blow a wet whistle.
    Not to mention the ones we inadvertently run over the top of diving form the beach with no diver down buoy.

    Boats fishing on your wreck is not uncommon but the wrecks are all public knowledge.. it's courtesy at that point, and way to many for profit operations think they are way more important than the recreational fisher-person and much less of a kayak fisher-person.

    Used to be a boat would come up to a wreck and get in line, down current, drop some baits and drift over/by the wreck and repeat, but spot lock technology stopped that allowing you to setup, mark a spot, and electronics keeps your position and you can just hover over a spot till you are tired, run the batteries down, or run out of fuel.
    Old Fugger who just likes to fish
  • John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 3,367 Captain
    krash said:
    Seems to be a pretty common thing for dive boats to drop a bunch of divers and then wait for them to pop their surface buoy marker and go pick them up.

    Every year when we are, were, out there lobster diving we end up picking up one or two divers separated far rom the dive boat that dropped them, many tourist panic'd waving or tryin to blow a safety whistle.. you eve try to blow a wet whistle.
    Not to mention the ones we inadvertently run over the top of diving form the beach with no diver down buoy.

    Boats fishing on your wreck is not uncommon but the wrecks are all public knowledge.. it's courtesy at that point, and way to many for profit operations think they are way more important than the recreational fisher-person and much less of a kayak fisher-person.

    Used to be a boat would come up to a wreck and get in line, down current, drop some baits and drift over/by the wreck and repeat, but spot lock technology stopped that allowing you to setup, mark a spot, and electronics keeps your position and you can just hover over a spot till you are tired, run the batteries down, or run out of fuel.
    Pretty much exactly what I experience, except I don't see too many boats using spot lock.  Instead, the bigger charter boats keep their engines idling to maintain position.  I find the amount of fish on my fishfinder decreases with the roar of their diesels.
  • CaptJCaptJ Posts: 1,402 Officer
    There was a time when negative behavior was addressed at the dock. Some people need/deserve an attitude correction but this is how it is in 2021.

  • tarponhuntertarponhunter Posts: 470 Deckhand
    Some people wonder why you kayak guys pull in so many fish but to me it all makes sense. Many guys dont realize just how far those engines can be heard underwater, and if you dont think the fish have learned what that noise could lead too, well you are sadly mistaken. All these cheap **** charter boats that hover over the wrecks irk me because if they really wanted to catch fish, they would do drifts and cut the engines. Instead, like you mentioned they're just trying to get a big aj or shark for their tourists
  • krashkrash Posts: 764 Officer
    edited March 23 #10
    There are a lot of theory's by the older fishing captains that the drone of a diesel motor in an older sport fisher boat caught more fish than a gas motor... but now-days guys have 3 or 4 of those fancy $70k 450 HP 4-stroke's you can hardly hear on a 50' CC Open Fisherman with electronics linking the GPS and the $80K computerized steering system so they just push a button and set the boat on a spot and choose a direction they want the computer to hold the nose of the boat and hang out.. Now you can even get a system that will hold the boat in position next to the dock.

    But there still is an issue with attitude out there, and law suits on the dock.
    Old Fugger who just likes to fish
  • tarponhuntertarponhunter Posts: 470 Deckhand
    krash said:
    There are a lot of theory's by the older fishing captains that the drone of a diesel motor in an older sport fisher boat caught more fish than a gas motor... but no-days guys have 3 or 4 of those fance $80k 450 HP 4-stroke's you can hardly hear on a 50' CC Open Fisherman with electronics linking the GPS and the computerized steering system so they just push a button and set the boat on a spot and choose a direction they want the computer to hold the nose of the boat and hang out.. Now you can even get a system that will hold the boat in position next to the dock.

    But there still is an issue with attitude out there, and law suits on the dock.
    That is a good point and I do believe the commotion and noise of an engine may attract fish. Cobia is a great example, and some pelagic while you are trolling. However, I do believe the fish over these wrecks, especially the groupers and snappers and tuna , have wisened up.
  • John McKroidJohn McKroid Posts: 3,367 Captain
    krash said:
    There are a lot of theory's by the older fishing captains that the drone of a diesel motor in an older sport fisher boat caught more fish than a gas motor... but no-days guys have 3 or 4 of those fance $80k 450 HP 4-stroke's you can hardly hear on a 50' CC Open Fisherman with electronics linking the GPS and the computerized steering system so they just push a button and set the boat on a spot and choose a direction they want the computer to hold the nose of the boat and hang out.. Now you can even get a system that will hold the boat in position next to the dock.

    But there still is an issue with attitude out there, and law suits on the dock.
    That is a good point and I do believe the commotion and noise of an engine may attract fish. Cobia is a great example, and some pelagic while you are trolling. However, I do believe the fish over these wrecks, especially the groupers and snappers and tuna , have wisened up.
    I wonder if that theory might be a little skewed due to the fact that when those older diesels were in service there were a hell of a lot more fish in the ocean to catch.  They have had success putting music in crab traps, so I guess it must work for some species, but I have yet to have a positive experience from noise.  The sound of a sinker hitting the bottom is known to spook muttons.
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