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Florida Man Shoots, Kills Home Intruder Who Was Attacking His Wife, Police Say

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  • TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 17,010 AG
    edited May 28 #32
    Tarp...I'm not here to win the Spelling Bee...
    Talk with a Southern Twang being Southern Inbred and all.. Git It.
    Why do I think blacks are commiting Most Of The Crime..
    No Fathers , No Social Structure , No Parenting Skills....The list is long.
    Me , A Southern Inbred , Overweight Cracker...Not much I can do..I'm already the Enemy I guess.
    Who's gonna listen to me..Big Al ..? Tyrone , T Square...ok I made that one up..
    Nobody said anything about your spelling.  ;)

    You're not the enemy, far from it.  Don't tell anyone but I enjoy most of your posts.  Just do me a favor and don't shoot your neighbors because they took a few palmetto berries off your property while screaming "go back to your country" and we'll be just fine.  :)

    Thanks for answering the questions, and I don't think any of them are wrong.  What did you think about my answer earlier to the same question -- particularly the difference between "crime" and "arrests"?
  • Turner River TerrorTurner River Terror Posts: 7,849 Admiral
    WAIT...What about Me..?
    No Comment after all that Typing I did ..!!
    I usually catch my biggest Bass at night on a big honkin Spinnerbait. Slow roll it just below the surface..
    Killin and Grillin :grin
  • CageyCagey Central FloridaPosts: 917 Officer
    micci_man said:
    Just on the news. Bystanders say "she shouldn't have been shot.It doesn't matter if she had a gun pointing it  ay cops or not." That should sum it up to the way those in that hood think.

      
    Good luck on the bass!

    But yeah I hear you. They shoot some 500 white people a year, while white people shoot less than 250 of them per year, and police kill nearly twice as many white people as they do black people, but yet they want to keep on committing most of the violent crime but not be held accountable- ever.

    And you never ever hear any one of them taking any responsibility for their violence. I just don't get it. This needs to change.

    Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton need to one be real men of the cloth and not just the skin.
  • cadmancadman Home of the Gators Posts: 32,095 AG
    I read the Tallahassee Crime Arrest Reports every day.
    This morning it was 12 black..2 white. arrested. 
    It's a pattern I see daily... Blacks are commiting most of the crime.....Why ?
    Is the White Man keeping them down , Or maybe poor Parenting and a Feral attitude..
    The statement that blacks commit the most crimes based on arrest reports is incorrect. It would be true that more blacks are arrested for crimes, but is that due to more aggressive police action to catch them. Maybe more whites are let off with a warning when caught with drugs and such? Maybe the white kids get their parents called instead of the cops? There could be 100 reasons as to why more blacks get arrested than whites other than simply they commit more crimes.

    I remember in high school a bunch of us were hanging out where we should not have been (should have been in school) the black kids got singled out, searched, questioned, and basically harassed. The rest of us were told to get back to school. 

    It used to be called getting arrested for being black. I know it still happens today.

    Mini Mart Magnate

    I am just here for my amusement. 

  • micci_manmicci_man Somewhere in FLPosts: 14,567 AG
    Speaking from over a decade's experience in the criminal justice system...

    Its not true that blacks are committing most of the general crime. Most of the general crime, at least in north Florida, is committed white meth-heads. Drug possession and theft charges.

    What is true is that the overwhelming amount of violent crime is committed by young, black, males. If its an armed robbery, a home-invasion robbery, or a general neighborhood shooting, its overwhelmingly likely to be a young black male as the perp.

    When I was in private practice doing criminal defense my best paying clients were black drug dealers. They always had cash on hand to pay my fees in full. In my office behind closed doors, they behaved as normal human beings. Polite, well spoken, no different than any other person I might sit and have a conversation with. In court, they turned all to sneers and mumbling and general thug swagger. Whenever I would see that kind of behavior as a prosecutor I thought they were sticking the finger up at the system. I learned from the defense work that what they were really doing was posturing to the other gang members and drug dealers in the court room to show how hard they were. They weren't all that concerned with what the judge or the prosecutor thought. But they wanted the other black guys sitting in the inmate box to know how big and bad they were.

    African American males have a major problem. It isn't their genetics or their race. Its their culture. They're living out what they listen to in their music. They don't look at their thug lives as a necessary evil they must endure because the man's got them down. They do it because they think its cool and their major cultural influencers are getting too rich off of it to tell them its not. 

    This is an aspect to race relations that needs to be talked out honestly in dialogues whenever we talk about racism as a whole in American society. Black males have an obligation to reject the thug life irregardless as to whatever else is going socially, and all black leaders young and old should stand united in condemning music that glorifies the drug and violence culture prevalent in black communities. Not only would that be in the best interest of black communities directly, it also would help short-circuit racism. The problem, that no one wants to openly admit to, is that the thug culture is causing blacks to live out racist stereotypes. In effect, they're validating racist rhetoric by embracing and reveling in the kinds of violent and trashy actions and culture that's of the exact sort that racists accuse them of being a part of as a matter of their racial identity. If MLK could see the state of African American culture in the US today, I have no doubt that after he stopped weeping, the fire and brimstone that he would bring down on young black males and on the hip hop music industry would be nuclear. In the case of the young black males themselves, it would be epic tough love. In the case of the hip hop industry, it would be like Jesus cleansing the temple. The hip hop artists and executives are the money changers of today, corrupting the morals of the people in the name of money. 

    But its all about money. Trash hip-hop music is a billion dollar industry 100 times over or more. No one who benefits from it is going to flush it down the toilet. The other side likes to rail on corporate power. Well, rail on the hip hop industry, to the extent that a large part of it glories a negative lifestyle that keeps black people down while lining its pockets with gold. 
    Enough said, shut'r down...
    Common Sense can't be bought, taught or gifted, yet it is one of the few things in life that is free, and most refuse to even attempt to possess it. - Miguel Cervantes
  • johnpowersjohnpowers BayPosts: 2,898 Captain
    Bullfrog nailed it. 
    But.........I’m sure the you know who will be along to disagree and tell us how we are all a bunch of racist.......... ;)
  • TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 17,010 AG
    edited May 28 #39
    Not at all, Johnny.

    Perhaps you missed my clicking the "agree" button.

    Next time hover over it before posting lest you stick your foot in your mouth for the 2,726th time.
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 2,709 Captain
    edited May 28 #40
    micci_man said:
    Speaking from over a decade's experience in the criminal justice system...

    Its not true that blacks are committing most of the general crime. Most of the general crime, at least in north Florida, is committed white meth-heads. Drug possession and theft charges.

    What is true is that the overwhelming amount of violent crime is committed by young, black, males. If its an armed robbery, a home-invasion robbery, or a general neighborhood shooting, its overwhelmingly likely to be a young black male as the perp.

    When I was in private practice doing criminal defense my best paying clients were black drug dealers. They always had cash on hand to pay my fees in full. In my office behind closed doors, they behaved as normal human beings. Polite, well spoken, no different than any other person I might sit and have a conversation with. In court, they turned all to sneers and mumbling and general thug swagger. Whenever I would see that kind of behavior as a prosecutor I thought they were sticking the finger up at the system. I learned from the defense work that what they were really doing was posturing to the other gang members and drug dealers in the court room to show how hard they were. They weren't all that concerned with what the judge or the prosecutor thought. But they wanted the other black guys sitting in the inmate box to know how big and bad they were.

    African American males have a major problem. It isn't their genetics or their race. Its their culture. They're living out what they listen to in their music. They don't look at their thug lives as a necessary evil they must endure because the man's got them down. They do it because they think its cool and their major cultural influencers are getting too rich off of it to tell them its not. 

    This is an aspect to race relations that needs to be talked out honestly in dialogues whenever we talk about racism as a whole in American society. Black males have an obligation to reject the thug life irregardless as to whatever else is going socially, and all black leaders young and old should stand united in condemning music that glorifies the drug and violence culture prevalent in black communities. Not only would that be in the best interest of black communities directly, it also would help short-circuit racism. The problem, that no one wants to openly admit to, is that the thug culture is causing blacks to live out racist stereotypes. In effect, they're validating racist rhetoric by embracing and reveling in the kinds of violent and trashy actions and culture that's of the exact sort that racists accuse them of being a part of as a matter of their racial identity. If MLK could see the state of African American culture in the US today, I have no doubt that after he stopped weeping, the fire and brimstone that he would bring down on young black males and on the hip hop music industry would be nuclear. In the case of the young black males themselves, it would be epic tough love. In the case of the hip hop industry, it would be like Jesus cleansing the temple. The hip hop artists and executives are the money changers of today, corrupting the morals of the people in the name of money. 

    But its all about money. Trash hip-hop music is a billion dollar industry 100 times over or more. No one who benefits from it is going to flush it down the toilet. The other side likes to rail on corporate power. Well, rail on the hip hop industry, to the extent that a large part of it glories a negative lifestyle that keeps black people down while lining its pockets with gold. 
    Enough said, shut'r down...
    I certainly can't say anything better and agree with all of this 100%. 
    I do want to add something as someone who actually listen's to hip hop.  There is another hip hop.  One 99.999% of you are clueless about.  There are countless hip hop artists that not only have a positive message, but are linguistic geniuses.  True poetry of modern day.  And you won't hear it on the radio or see it on tv.
    It's one of my biggest pet peeves.  I'm often embarrassed to admit I listen to hip hop bc I know people will think ONLY of the garbage that the mainstream pushes out there.  And 99% of it is absolute garbage, repeating over and over again.  The greatest, truly creative stuff is absolutely not on the radio.
    Now ask yourself, why isn't it played on the radio? 

    There will never be a really free and enlightened state until the state comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived.
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 2,709 Captain


    There will never be a really free and enlightened state until the state comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived.
  • CageyCagey Central FloridaPosts: 917 Officer
    spangler said:

    ... The greatest, truly creative stuff is absolutely not on the radio.
    Now ask yourself, why isn't it played on the radio? 

    I got an answer for that one. I use to work in radio for a short time.

    I got to see first hand what was going on inside of large radio stations and why...

    Back in the old days radio and record companies were separate businesses. Today the record companies OWN the large radio markets and stations lock, stock, and barrel.

    Back in the old days recording companies use to have pay off called payola which was outlawed just to get their music played on the radio. DJ's and station executives were paid to play.

    Not so today. Today the large recording companies have steadily bought up the radio stations and now own them so that what is played through them is what the recordings companies want to sell all of us leaving the independents and little guys out in the cold.

    And today, every second of 100,000 watt broadcast power is very very valuable indeed.

    Every second of radio time is strictly controlled by survey results.


  • TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 17,010 AG
    Radio isn't the most important distribution method of music, and hasn't been for a while.

    Get with the times, you old farts!  ;)
  • conchydongconchydong Pompano BeachPosts: 6,857 Admiral
    Spangler, I tried  listen to your rap song. Sorry but it is not for me. Maybe a generational thing. I'd rather listen to this style of Black music.


    “Everyone behaves badly--given the chance.”
    ― Ernest Hemingway

  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 2,709 Captain
    edited May 28 #45
    Well, things have certainly evolved away from radio.  But it created the culture that continues to be at the forefront.  The groups that get all the funding for production and live shows, continue to be the one's promoting horrible messages.  So fine, why is that?
    There will never be a really free and enlightened state until the state comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived.
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 2,709 Captain
    edited May 28 #46
    I knew some simply couldn't listen.  Which doesn't bother me and I get it.  Doesn't speak to everyone.  Here are the some of the highlights.  Even if you don't like the 'lingo' their is a real positive message for young black people.
    Here we go
    Life is a blast when you know what you're doin'
    Best to know what you're doin' 'fore your life get ruined
    Life is a thrill when your skill is developed
    If you ain't got a skill or trade, then shut the hell up

    Rap ain't about bustin caps and f'n beeches (edited by me bc it would be censored)
    It's about fluency with rhymin ingenuity
    All of this is new to me, see I peep rhymes
    with scrutiny, under a microscope I walk a tightrope
    A thin line between insanity and sanity
    mixed with a little vanity, boostin the morality
    ...
    You can't see this, your defeatist attitude'll
    get you nowhere fast,
    ...
    You say you rappin but you don't know the essence
    Just hoe slap and bustin caps is your message
    Plus every time I put some scrill down, you steal it
    If that's your way of teachin me a lesson I don't feel it
    Your raps reflect your life and that's a shame
    cause the way you're soundin, you must think that it's a game
    I can see if you came from the ghetto, but you came
    from the Meadow -- you really need to let that go
    You got no respect for hip-hop, and you tryin to rhyme
    Biding your time and I find it a crime
    I even tried to bury the hatchet man
    Cause we all African, you want to be a rapper
    start practicin, you can't even flow right
    Spend most of your time F'n hoes, getting in fights
    Hangin out, with no mission in life
    And you're missing your life, and you'll be missing out on life
    I won't sweat you for that G you stole
    cause if you're still alive, I'll be there to see you fold
    Told ya!

    You could be a rapper an actor a gun clapper
    A comedian providing laughter as a bachelor
    A pastor of a chapter, a doctor, a lawyer
    A fireman, a hired hand, whether boy or girl
    it's your world your future you control it
    Whatever you do, early on, is how you mold it
    I record it, sold it, told it to you
    Mr. Del wouldn't tell you nothin that ain't true, because
    Life is a blast when you know what you're doin'
    Best to know what you're doin' 'fore your life get ruined
    Life is a thrill when your skill is developed
    If you ain't got a skill or trade, then shut the hell up


    There will never be a really free and enlightened state until the state comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived.
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 2,709 Captain
    edited May 28 #47
    Just want to say one more thing, and then I'll never post another hip hop vid or song on here lol  I know that vast majority here probably hate it and I'm not ignorant to that.
    That song was published in 1998.  Since then their has been a renaissance and swell of so called 'Conscious Hip Hop'.  You can't even keep track of it all anymore.  Unfortunately, maybe 80% of the listeners are white. 
    It's just a shame that the black culture doesn't do more to promote it. 
    I wanted to make people aware that it does exist.  Not all hip hop is bad.
    There will never be a really free and enlightened state until the state comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived.
  • mplspugmplspug Palmetto FloridaPosts: 12,263 AG
    Are those lyrics Eminem's?   B)

    Captain Todd Approves

  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 2,709 Captain
    Eminem is more negative than not.  Although I do consider him a genius word smith.  Keep hoping he finds some enlightenment B)
    There will never be a really free and enlightened state until the state comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived.
  • CageyCagey Central FloridaPosts: 917 Officer
    We need a new Skynyrd! And a new Allman brothers! And a new MTB and CDB!
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 2,709 Captain
    edited May 28 #51
    Yall gonna hate me, but the great story telling/message conveying lyrics of the 60's and 70's music now only exist in hip hop (conscious hip hop)! lol
    I love all music btw but not a huge fan of country.  Mostly more radio garbage as far as I'm concerned.  I do like the old time stuff like Cash.  And I absolutely love bluegrass.  Most contemporary country just sounds repetitive and whiny to me.
    There will never be a really free and enlightened state until the state comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived.
  • FloridaMetalFabFloridaMetalFab North CubaPosts: 1,027 Officer
    Cagey said:
    We need a new Skynyrd! And a new Allman brothers! And a new MTB and CDB!
    How about Jamey Johnson covering Skynard? Some of the protesters might even like this one.


  • Florida BullfrogFlorida Bullfrog Posts: 3,293 Captain
    spangler said:
    Yall gonna hate me, but the great story telling/message conveying lyrics of the 60's and 70's music now only exist in hip hop (conscious hip hop)! lol
    I love all music btw but not a huge fan of country.  Mostly more radio garbage as far as I'm concerned.  I do like the old time stuff like Cash.  And I absolutely love bluegrass.  Most contemporary country just sounds repetitive and whiny to me.
    Oh no!

    I totally agree that there is positive hip hop. Plenty of it. The beat and sound of hip hop is irrelevant to my point. Its only the negative message that makes much popular hip hop a bad influence. 

    But I cannot agree at all that hip hop is either the only source nor the primary source of thought provoking or story-telling lyrics. Various forms of alternative rock have hip hop beat on most fronts for engrossing stories and social commentary. Especially modern forms of metal. 
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 2,709 Captain
    lol, yeah, no I agree with ya BF.  That was me stirring the pot just a tad :D
    There will never be a really free and enlightened state until the state comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, from which all its own power and authority are derived.
  • mplspugmplspug Palmetto FloridaPosts: 12,263 AG
    Eminem's godzilla challenge is crazy.

    Captain Todd Approves

  • CageyCagey Central FloridaPosts: 917 Officer
    Cagey said:
    We need a new Skynyrd! And a new Allman brothers! And a new MTB and CDB!
    How about Jamey Johnson covering Skynard? Some of the protesters might even like this one.

    That was a good cover. Slowed down a bit, but a good one. Ronnie would be smiling at that one!

    And how about some of the orginal band! I wish we had young Southerners who respected their cultural heritage and will carry on the passed down legacy rather than lose their culture and adopt one that is not theirs.






  • johnpowersjohnpowers BayPosts: 2,898 Captain
    Not at all, Johnny.

    Perhaps you missed my clicking the "agree" button.

    Next time hover over it before posting lest you stick your foot in your mouth for the 2,726th time.
    You have a guilty conscience?
     I don’t recall mentioning you?
  • dave44dave44 Posts: 11,334 AG
    Not at all, Johnny.

    Perhaps you missed my clicking the "agree" button.

    Next time hover over it before posting lest you stick your foot in your mouth for the 2,726th time.
    You have a guilty conscience?
     I don’t recall mentioning you?
    But that would have been fun for 40,000 posts and millions of characters!
  • joelunchbucketjoelunchbucket Posts: 476 Deckhand
    edited May 30 #59
    Looks like the resident spell checker needs to write “your” 1,000 times on the chalk board. Too busy displaying his pompousness to spell correctly, I suppose. Missed a word too. Probably forgot it, with his early onset dementia. 

    Shameful! LOL
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