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Jury Duty

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  • hooknlinehooknline Posts: 5,523 Admiral
    Im sensing a bicycle theme here. 
  • bicyclistbicyclist FlardaPosts: 1,654 Captain
    I was the only person of the 300 or so that had to appear....that rode a bike to the courthouse. 
  • hooknlinehooknline Posts: 5,523 Admiral
  • fish_stixfish_stix Posts: 1,375 Officer
    I was picked for the Federal Grand Jury in Orlando and spent 18 months driving over every other Wednesday. Very interesting and I was glad I was picked. Lots of drug trials and Organized Crime, one of which went the entire 18 months and was still ongoing when our time was over. I was really surprised at the number of Post Office crimes we heard, mostly PO employees stealing merchandise, guns and credit cards. A couple of the drug dealers were executed by associates before their GJ hearings and one major dealer was killed in the arrest attempt by Feds the night before his hearing, but we did have hearings on several of his underlings. It was satisfying to help get some of these scum off the streets. I was also  summoned  twice for state trials but was not selected for either because my oldest son was a police officer in those jurisdictions.
  • King_MeKing_Me Delray Beach, FLPosts: 6,359 Admiral
    Do you think when your participation in a jury pool is kind of bad like in my case, that they might put a mark by your name so you're never selected again?  Just wondering.
  • conchydongconchydong Pompano BeachPosts: 6,578 Admiral
    No, I think it is more like the lotto. I have been called four times and my wife only once and she would love to go. She watches all of those forensic file shows and thinks she is a Columbo. Luck of the draw.

    “Everyone behaves badly--given the chance.”
    ― Ernest Hemingway

  • FishingpervertFishingpervert Deltona, FloridaPosts: 1,010 Officer
    edited March 26 #38
  • MelbourneMarkMelbourneMark Posts: 2,166 Captain
    bicyclist said:
    research jury nullification

    not for child molestation cases tho, they should get the chair
    Interesting.  Pretty rare. Can't imagine many cases where 6 to 14 people would come to this conclusion without resulting in a hung  jury.

    jury nullification is really the last step we, as citizens, have against a fraudulent govt.   There is/was a big movement in the libertarian-ish circles for this.  the bigger cases were for drug cases, capturing rain water, planting their own gardens, solar power,  various other property rights cases, etc...  you know, the dumb stuff that govt has "over stepped" their power.   

    Obviously, everyone has their own ideas on individual cases, but really the jury is the last straw between jail and freedom for your fellow citizens. 

    there have been people arrested over handing out pamphlets about jury nullification on the courtsteps

    bicylcist, im actually quite surprised that you have not heard of this before?!  

    And a hung jury does not = guilty! 

    anyways, all of my jury notifications have not gone past me calling the automated phone number the night before.   

    kudos for you and everyone else doing their civic duty. 

    and may the child molester be molested, every..single..day.. in prison, until a broom stick up the wrong direction ends his life
  • GardawgGardawg Posts: 9,471 Admiral
    I was on a jury in Federal Court.  Four Columbians who were involved with coke smuggling.  Took about a week of testimony.   

    Boring as watching paint dry. When it was time to deliberate we went into the jury room and I started looking through a box of evidence the Prosecutor had furnished.  Everyone else just started talking. 

    Well Well ... What have we here?   It's a kilo of coke wrapped in plastic. 
    I tossed the brick up on the table and everyone jumped back like it was a rattlesnake. 



    We sent their butts to prison.
    “Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves.

    Heres Tom with the Weather.”
  • King_MeKing_Me Delray Beach, FLPosts: 6,359 Admiral


    I haven't received a summons, yet.  So maybe we are "black listed", King-me. 
    My GF is a convicted felon and she always gets summoned.  She has to forward a letter stating her status of being a felon.  Its been a few years since I was selected.
  • Florida BullfrogFlorida Bullfrog Posts: 3,161 Captain
    I’ve never understood the psychology behind that if you were molested as a child it would seem that you would be so against molesters as an adult.
    It influences your sexual development. The stuff you see or do or have done to you as a kid or young teenager will effect who and what you find attractive or a turn on. That's another reason molestation and **** of children is so insidious. It can actually corrupt the children. 
  • FishingpervertFishingpervert Deltona, FloridaPosts: 1,010 Officer
    edited March 26 #43
  • GardawgGardawg Posts: 9,471 Admiral
    Sooooo ... every child molester was molested as a child?  And every molested child will grow up to molest other children?
    Nope ... it's a choice.  If you were molested as a child, you still make the choice as an adult whether to commit that crime on others.
    If it's NOT a choice, but an inherent fact of childhood experience, doesn't that put child molesters in the same club as any other LGBTQ etc. identifier?  "It's not their fault, it's just how they were raised."  "It's not their fault, it's just how their brains are wired."  Blah, blah, blah.
    Molested children often molest other children long before they are adults.

    As the twig is bent so grows the tree.

    Reasons are not excuses.


    “Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves.

    Heres Tom with the Weather.”
  • mindyabinessmindyabiness Posts: 6,164 Admiral
    edited March 12 #45
    I was selected as a juror once. Sent a man back to prison for a long time....he needed to be there.

    I felt it was a good experience overall, however I remember being surprised and more than a little disappointed after viewing the cross-section of our population while waiting to be evaluated.
    I was also surprised at how some of the other jurors viewed the evidence. There were 7 of us and I really felt a few were unable to be objective, unable to understand the judges instructions as if they were not paying attention.
    It was an eye opening experience for me, I thought people were smarter than what I experienced there. It made me feel kind of sick in a way. I don't think it's like that all over the country....at least I hope not.
     
    Arguing with idiots is like playing chess with a pigeon... No matter how good you are, the bird is going to crap on the board and strut around like it won anyway.
  • Gary SGary S Posts: 2,113 Captain
    I've been on two drug cases over the years federal, one cocaine and one heroine. Both cases found guilty with my help. 
     Been picked for a couple civil jurys but the cases were settled after we were picked. 
     The last case was with Judge John Schlesinger husband of judge Marilyn Milian of the TV show The People's Court, he was nice and said a lot of times when a defendant gets a look at a jury they are ready to settle.
  • bicyclistbicyclist FlardaPosts: 1,654 Captain
    I was selected as a juror once. Sent a man back to prison for a long time....he needed to be there.

    I felt it was a good experience overall, however I remember being surprised and more than a little disappointed after viewing the cross-section of our population while waiting to be evaluated.
    I was also surprised at how some of the other jurors viewed the evidence. There were 7 of us and I really felt a few were unable to be objective, unable to understand the judges instructions as if they were not paying attention.
    It was an eye opening experience for me, I thought people were smarter than what I experienced there. It made me feel kind of sick in a way. I don't think it's like that all over the country....at least I hope not.
     
    I was lucky that my fellow jurors were such a professional and intelligent group.
  • hatcityhatcity Stuart,FLPosts: 3,323 Captain
    seem to get called every other year. wife once
    been on a jury for a crime that probably did happen, but the evidence was poor
    made second round for a civil case involving large truck crash. being the owner of a large truck at the time, truck reps. wanted me. plaintiff...not so much
    got a summons now for the 30 of March...maybe develop "chemo-brain" before that

    I was not born stupid, just had lots of practice
  • Florida BullfrogFlorida Bullfrog Posts: 3,161 Captain
    Sooooo ... every child molester was molested as a child?  And every molested child will grow up to molest other children?
    Nope ... it's a choice.  If you were molested as a child, you still make the choice as an adult whether to commit that crime on others.
    If it's NOT a choice, but an inherent fact of childhood experience, doesn't that put child molesters in the same club as any other LGBTQ etc. identifier?  "It's not their fault, it's just how they were raised."  "It's not their fault, it's just how their brains are wired."  Blah, blah, blah.
    No one here is saying they aren’t accountable. Otherwise we wouldn’t be prosecuting them and the mental health expert on the jury wouldn’t have been ready to convict. Its just a fact that’s how those people are created. 

    And we’re all born with selfish moral corruption that we’re all accountable for even though we’re born with it and can’t help but succumb to it. It just manifests itself differently in each person. 

    If you really want to kick over the anthill, mention how its a fact childhood molestation a major factor in causing a person to be homosexual. That sounds like a fun topic. Someone should open a thread on it. 
  • MRichardsonMRichardson Posts: 10,326 AG
    edited March 12 #50
    I know too many scumbags, criminals and liars in the judicial and prosecutorial system to ever think the gov't court system is any better than any other human endeavor.  
    It's the best there is?  Maybe.  I kind of doubt that our system is better than more advanced societies', like Scandinavia. We enjoy retribution too much.  We place vengeance over innocence. We devalue the defense of the charged, but spent huge $$$ on the prosecution.  State attorneys get attention.  Public defenders get laughed at.  

    That's not to say that in this instance (Cyclist's) that there wasn't sufficient proof to reach the verdict that they did.  I'm sure there was, and there usually is.  But that doesn't mean it's ok when there's not but they do anyways because people are upset about something else.
    I have never seen live bones, but I know that they are often used by rich people to decorate the interior.
  • TarponatorTarponator Under a BridgePosts: 17,003 AG
    edited March 12 #51

    If you really want to kick over the anthill, mention how its a fact childhood molestation a major factor in causing a person to be homosexual. That sounds like a fun topic. Someone should open a thread on it. 
    I'll bite.

    Fact?

    Prove it.
  • Florida BullfrogFlorida Bullfrog Posts: 3,161 Captain

    If you really want to kick over the anthill, mention how its a fact childhood molestation a major factor in causing a person to be homosexual. That sounds like a fun topic. Someone should open a thread on it. 
    I'll bite.

    Fact?

    Prove it.
    Here or a fresh thread?
  • ferris1248ferris1248 Posts: 7,833 Moderator
    Fresh thread

    "That which is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow. That is the whole of the law. The rest is commentary."

    Rabbi Hillel (c20 BCE)

  • FloridaMetalFabFloridaMetalFab North CubaPosts: 991 Officer
    Today is my last day on call for jury duty. I have no bone in my body that wants to participate in anything to do with the 2 tiered kangaroo west palm court that thought letting Jeffrey Epstein spend a couple hours a day in gun club was justice.
  • bicyclistbicyclist FlardaPosts: 1,654 Captain
    The guy we found guilty.

    LIFE IN PRISON. NO PAROLE.

  • mike_smike_s Posts: 442 Deckhand
    Served on a grand jury for 3 months a couple of years ago.  One day a week, usually 2 -3 times a month depending case load. We handed out 1st degree murder indictments like they were candy.  Really gruesome cases.  Mom, daughter starving grandma to death to keep SS checks. Majority were domestic violence, drug deal rip offs next. 
  • MRichardsonMRichardson Posts: 10,326 AG
    bicyclist said:
    The guy we found guilty.

    LIFE IN PRISON. NO PAROLE.

    What'd he do?  Use a plastic straw?
    I have never seen live bones, but I know that they are often used by rich people to decorate the interior.
  • stc1993stc1993 Albany, GA Carrabelle, FLPosts: 7,297 Admiral
    It's not easy to be a juror on a capital murder case.
  • bottom feederbottom feeder Posts: 1,262 Officer
    I finally got called in January and I couldn't go because I was in the hospital.  Palm beach County asked for a fax from the Hospital before they would excuse me.  First time I ever got called and I always  wanted to go.

    Leaving Florida... take a developer with you!

  • MRichardsonMRichardson Posts: 10,326 AG
    stc1993 said:
    It's not easy to be a juror on a capital murder case.
    You think that's stressful, try being a defendant
    I have never seen live bones, but I know that they are often used by rich people to decorate the interior.
  • Big BatteryBig Battery Posts: 20,358 AG
    I know too many scumbags, criminals and liars in the judicial and prosecutorial system to ever think the gov't court system is any better than any other human endeavor.  
    It's the best there is?  Maybe.  I kind of doubt that our system is better than more advanced societies', like Scandinavia. We enjoy retribution too much.  We place vengeance over innocence. We devalue the defense of the charged, but spent huge $$$ on the prosecution.  State attorneys get attention.  Public defenders get laughed at.  

    That's not to say that in this instance (Cyclist's) that there wasn't sufficient proof to reach the verdict that they did.  I'm sure there was, and there usually is.  But that doesn't mean it's ok when there's not but they do anyways because people are upset about something else.

    "Victim's Rights Groups" kinda have an anti-innocence right to it.
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