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Why Don't Bass Fisherman Use Spinning Gear?

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Replies

  • Alex from GAAlex from GA Posts: 1,647 Captain
    Like most right handed people I cast with my right and switch with a bait caster but crank a spinning reel with my left.  I fight with my left with bait casters, conventional saltwater reels and fly rods.
  • pixelenvypixelenvy FloridaPosts: 5 Greenhorn
    The reason why I prefer casting reels is the gear ratios, comfort level, and casting accuracy. If the wind is really bad I will switch to spinning or if I am casting finesse baits. 
  • cortrcortr Posts: 443 Deckhand
    Much more accurate with Bait caster if casting to precise targets along shoreline 
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 16,284 AG
    Boat ramp this morning on the way to work was steady with bass boats, looks like the gettin's good this morning before the front.  
    You can't pet a dead dog back to life 
  • CageyCagey Central FloridaPosts: 917 Officer
    I think the old switch hand routine came from a time when most baitcast reels were all made with the handle on the right side. But time has changed this and you do still see it but usually people still stuck in the old rut, or just not willing to change.

    I am one of those people who don't swap hands. Whether I am using baitcast or spinning, handle is always on the left side. I retrained myself.
  • MRichardsonMRichardson Posts: 10,461 AG
    I switch over, usually as the lure is at the end of it's cast.  I like it, seem as natural as anything.
    Hasn't cost me a fish, ever.

    However, when fly fishing, I reel left handed.  Go figure.
    I have never seen live bones, but I know that they are often used by rich people to decorate the interior.
  • L8RBRAL8RBRA Posts: 792 Officer
    Personally I think its whatever works for you and is most comfortable and there is no right or wrong. I am right handed and reel exclusively with my right hand. The lefts job is to just keep the pressure on and pump that takes no coordination. I cant reel with my left hand. When I do, I feel like I'm patting my head and rubbing my belly.
  • ivnivn gvillePosts: 144 Deckhand
    I prefer to fish light/ultralight tackle - 1/4oz is BIG weight for me in fresh water.  And there has never been a bait caster in my budget that could do that.  And for the few that I've tried way back, they work for me for heavier stuff (weeds, lily pad, etc) but then braided lines came out and a medium light spinning rod would work just fine, so I never really even got good enough to not have backlash every fourth or fifth cast....

    So yes, spinning for me, fresh or salt, and I fish mostly fresh.  
  • FishingpervertFishingpervert Deltona, FloridaPosts: 1,010 Officer
    edited March 2020 #40
  • MulletMaster239MulletMaster239 Southwest FloridaPosts: 873 Officer
    For bass fishing I use both, I always take one small baitcaster and one small spinning reel. The spinning reel is for lighter baits or casting into bad wind. The baitcaster is for better casting distance and the better drag system in case I hook something larger than usual plus I’ve had it since I was a kid. The levelwind mechanism broke while fighting a large jack crevalle years ago (shouldn’t have used such a light setup in saltwater) so I took it off and have to guide the line back on, but get even more casting distance.

    I’ve fished both types of reels for a long time so I am used to reeling with both hands. I actually prefer holding the rod to fight a fish with my left hand because I’m used to it since I always use conventional reels for tarpon fishing.
  • Spoonplugger1Spoonplugger1 Posts: 13 Deckhand
    If you watch the old Tom Mann Fishing Show, bet you'll never guess what he used? If a Hall of Famer can do it, anyone can. 
  • Spoonplugger1Spoonplugger1 Posts: 13 Deckhand
    Bet you'll never guess what type rods are used in Alaska by the guides with inexperienced customers, one of the salmon caught back in the day that was almost a world's record was caught in Petersburg, AK. on a spinning rod. Inshore rods are pretty popular in spinning versions, if you want you can find all kinds of reasons for selecting a certain style of fishing gear over another that have nothing to do with the tackle's real capability.
  • finbullyfinbully Posts: 877 Officer
    edited January 2020 #44
    So I'm an older guy and when I was beginning to seriously freshwater fish, spinning reels did not have the quality you can buy now (drag, gears, everything). So maybe for us older folks, it is more habit than anything else.
  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 21,253 AG
    I'm a righty...but had to cast with my left arm for 2 months when I broke my right wrist.....was the clumsiest I felt in my life.

    I can and do use both...but do the hand switch like Mrich...at the end of a cast...   Old habits die hard...or not at all.  
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • CageyCagey Central FloridaPosts: 917 Officer
    I actually prefer a hefty spinning rod for lily pad bass fishing. I find that I can do more accurate pin point casts and do a better delivery and presentation with a spinning rod. I often whoop up on my fishing buddies with it too!

    It is kind of funny to watch them change rods and lures over and over in the lily pads while I stick with using one rod and can stick with just one lure but sometimes different colors of it and get more hits than they do.

    I use a 7' MH fast rod with a 4000 size spinning reel loaded with 30 pound braid and go to town in heavy cover. And I get a kick out of watching my buddies try doing the same thing as successfully with baitcast reels and struggling with it while the spinning rod and reel make easy work of it.
  • kayakerinkeywestkayakerinkeywest Posts: 639 Officer
    Fish prefer right hand casters and right hand reelers.
    Youtube - KEY WEST KAYAK FISHING https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkGY6yxE8kogYHKXisMhA2w
    All About The Bait Store - http://www.allaboutthebait.com/
  • MRichardsonMRichardson Posts: 10,461 AG
    Cagey said:
    I actually prefer a hefty spinning rod for lily pad bass fishing. I find that I can do more accurate pin point casts and do a better delivery and presentation with a spinning rod. I often whoop up on my fishing buddies with it too!

    It is kind of funny to watch them change rods and lures over and over in the lily pads while I stick with using one rod and can stick with just one lure but sometimes different colors of it and get more hits than they do.

    I use a 7' MH fast rod with a 4000 size spinning reel loaded with 30 pound braid and go to town in heavy cover. And I get a kick out of watching my buddies try doing the same thing as successfully with baitcast reels and struggling with it while the spinning rod and reel make easy work of it.
    Swap baitcaster w/spinning rod and it fits my application and experience.   :)  In the end it comes down to what you're good at.  For whatever, it seems only bass fishermen really get proficient with baitcasters. 
    I have never seen live bones, but I know that they are often used by rich people to decorate the interior.
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