Home Fly Fishing

What have you been tying (pt. 2)

13233343537

Replies

  • lmarinsalcedolmarinsalcedo Fort MyersPosts: 1 Greenhorn
    Tied my first fly with some random materials I stole from my wife’s knitting stash. Please let  me know how I can improve
  • SUPER DSUPER D Posts: 713 Officer
    Better than my first fly. I would put more white on the bottom, and the darker color on top, maybe about half the darker color on top. My first fly was just a couple of feathers tied to a hook, mostly white with a little red on front. I also tied one all red. The white ones caught more Jacks, and Lady fish than I could count one day at the power plant, then tried the red one. The Jacks and Lady fish didn't like the red, but caught my first two Tarpon ever. Later caught my first Snook on the white one. Good luck.
  • FishingpervertFishingpervert Deltona, FloridaPosts: 1,010 Officer
    edited March 27 #1084
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 3,839 Captain
    That reminds of when I joined a fishing club -after going through a divorce... Seems a lot of the members were also either divorced or working on their second or third marriage... 

    Of course none of us were fishing fanatics... no not at all...
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • sunflowersunflower Posts: 565 Officer
    SuperD and lmarinsalcedo,

               the location of the white (belly) fibers depends on whether this fly is meant to travel and be fished hook up or hook down. It looks to me like he tied the eyes on top of the hook shank. In that case, it will fish hook-up, and he has the white fibers in the proper position (belly down) in the water. If he has the lead eyes under the shank, then you are right that he needs to switch the fibers to properly mimic the white belly of a fish.
    Mark

    grace finds goodness in everything ...



  • CWFliesCWFlies StuartPosts: 85 Deckhand
    Not sure how but I got a 8" bass to eat that gamechanger. Waiting on spring to get here to try it out on tarpon and snook. Crazy movement and still throws ok on the 8wt when wet and with a 4/0 hook. Probably should throw it on the 10wt.

    This little guy did great during the minnow run on the beach last year. Hoping the spring run of Juvi poons love it too. Filled with tungsten UV resin to fall quicker.

    Basic white girl shrimp
    Classic bitters. Waiting on some colored UV resins to come  which hopefully will give a little more pop to the head. Might switch to barred round rubber legs too, 
  • FishingpervertFishingpervert Deltona, FloridaPosts: 1,010 Officer
    edited March 27 #1088
  • CWFliesCWFlies StuartPosts: 85 Deckhand
    Playing with UV resin.

    Careful it will make you never want to use 5min epoxy ever again. Plus now they make colored UV resin, tungsten, nano flake, glow in the dark and color changing pigments and probably a few other weird ones.  
  • FishingpervertFishingpervert Deltona, FloridaPosts: 1,010 Officer
    edited March 27 #1090
  • sunflowersunflower Posts: 565 Officer

    Never to early to dream.
    Puglisi fiber variants of tarpon flies: Cockroach, Black Death, Stu Apte, Palolo Worm, Toad, Palolo Worm


    Mark

    grace finds goodness in everything ...



  • FishingpervertFishingpervert Deltona, FloridaPosts: 1,010 Officer
    edited March 27 #1092
  • sunflowersunflower Posts: 565 Officer
    Venice, Florida tarpon fishing is in the open ocean in about 16 feet of water in May & June.
    No snags.
    That said, I don't use any of these except the Worms. I just tied the others for no reason.
    And the only one I ever throw is the purple one.
    You only catch fish with a fly you believe in.
    You only throw a fly you believe in.
    That's why it's the only one that works (for you). It's the only one you use.
    By "you," I mean "me."





    Mark

    grace finds goodness in everything ...



  • CWFliesCWFlies StuartPosts: 85 Deckhand
    I wanted gold eyes on here but I was out so now it just looks silly with orange. Good thing redfish don't care

  • CWFliesCWFlies StuartPosts: 85 Deckhand
    If it ain't chartreuse it ain't no use
    If it ain't white it ain't right
  • FishingpervertFishingpervert Deltona, FloridaPosts: 1,010 Officer
    edited March 27 #1096
  • sunflowersunflower Posts: 565 Officer
    edited January 24 #1097
    CWFlies,

              those mesh crabs look shockingly-lifeless in the photo. Do they move and wiggle? Have you tried rubber arms?
    It's hard to imagine they work better than a strong-armed Merkin. Have you had success with them for permit?
    Not trying to be offensive, I am just perplexed at them.
    Do you sell them? For how much?
    I myself prefer flies that are more "fly-like" and less "lure-like", but that's just my personal thing.
    Thanks.


     
    Mark

    grace finds goodness in everything ...



  • SUPER DSUPER D Posts: 713 Officer
    Mark, what makes a fly a fly, and a lure a lure? What it's tied with,or how heavy, or the look? Just would like your idea.
    All flies are lures, but most lures are not flies. What is the purpose of a fly? to lure a fish into eating it. Or lure a fly fisher
    into buying it. Hopefully both if you sell flies.
  • CWFliesCWFlies StuartPosts: 85 Deckhand
    Mark, they will not have nearly as much movement as other flies with more but the legs and claws do have some movement to them. Advantages to a flexo is 1) the life life look  2) it will fall much faster with less weight as water can pass through the body (thats how it was explained to me). Lighter weight can help casting distance if needed and can land softer. I have not personally used them on permit but I have caught snook and redfish on them and had clients catch permit, bonefish and striper with them. Waiting on a client to return from Maldives to let me know how they fared there for triggers and other species.
    Flexos are a very popular fly the word over. I would always have a few in the box but I'd have one of those strong arm merkins too. I do sell them and they are on my website which is now up and running cw-flies.com
    The great thing about tying flies is there is no end all fly. There will be days permit refuse the flexos and days they will refuse the strong arm, and days when you get so mad at them you think about switching to being a live bait fisherman. 


  • FishingpervertFishingpervert Deltona, FloridaPosts: 1,010 Officer
    edited March 27 #1100
  • sunflowersunflower Posts: 565 Officer

    SuperD,

              I go by the IGFA flyfishing website. They define a fly for record purposes as "anything Mark's cat would play with if he found it on the floor."

               Here he is.





    Mark

    grace finds goodness in everything ...



  • CWFliesCWFlies StuartPosts: 85 Deckhand
    What does IGFA say if I am more of a dog person?

  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 3,839 Captain
    A famous saltwater magazine and book author once mentioned that they used pogo hair to make a particular fly pattern... A few years later he admitted that pogo hair came from his neighbor’s ginger colored dog.

    my kind of fly tyer...
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • FishingpervertFishingpervert Deltona, FloridaPosts: 1,010 Officer
    edited March 27 #1104
  • sunflowersunflower Posts: 565 Officer
    edited January 24 #1105

    Thanks, Fishingpervert!

    Don't get me started. He is a Mainecoon, and he's a big, handsome, spoiled brute.


    Mark

    grace finds goodness in everything ...



  • SUPER DSUPER D Posts: 713 Officer
    Beautiful cat Mark. I have thought of using my dogs hair, but just haven't don it. I think the animal smell would help. In MHO, that's why Buck tail is such a good material. For this reason I always tie a little Buck tail in any Red fish fly I tie. I have a box I keep my Buck tail in, when I open it, my wife gives me a dirty look.
  • sunflowersunflower Posts: 565 Officer
    edited January 25 #1107

    I have a friend who ties snook flies using hair from his golden retriever.
    I have never tied a fly using hair from a pet. I'm sure you could.
    I think there is more to bucktail than how just it moves or smells. I'm no fly-tying genius, but I think choices between materials such as bucktail, fox, feathers, rabbit, etc are also based upon questions of wettability and buoyancy.
    I think bucktail is hollow and floats more.
    That is one of the main reasons why I prefer Puglisi fibers to natural ones.
    I like the fact that Puglisi fibers are uniform, homogenous, and dry and wet perfectly.
    There's no variation. Feathers used to drive me crazy trying for symmetry and match.
    Flies made of natural materials look much better on the vise, but I'n not sure they fish better.
    That said, I have said before that I'd rather fail with a pretty fly than catch a fish on an ugly fly.
    That's why I don't like "lure"-flies. They offend my sense of fly-fishing beauty.
    As SuperD said, the primary purpose of a commercial fly is to catch a fisherman. Catching fish is secondary.


    Mark

    grace finds goodness in everything ...



  • Banded WoodieBanded Woodie Posts: 7 Deckhand


    Tied up some clousers to get started back tying.  Still knocking the rust off but hopefully I can fool a couple on these. 
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 3,839 Captain
    edited January 26 #1109
    They'll  get bit... 

    Here's a homegrown clouser that we use a bunch in the interior of the brackish Everglades out of Flamingo and Chokoloskee...  Tied up on a Mustad #34007 2/0 - note the wire weedguard... Here's the Whitewater Clouser.

    Thread is Danville's flat waxed nylon, fl. green,  and this bug is tied up the way Lefty Kreh suggested all those years ago with all of the wing on one side of the hook... My anglers have taken everything that swims with this pattern - except tarpon...  In forty years of tossing flies at fish - never the first tarpon on a clouser - don't ask me why.  Fortunately, we've got plenty of stuff they will eat.... The eyes are large beadchain (the exact same size the pull cord on vertical blinds come with...).  The body, what there is of it is just two layers of flat waxed nylon in fl. fire orange and the first step is to tie the eyes in place then extend that orange thread back onto the shank about 1/2 inch... then whip finish tying off,  then turning the hook in the vise so that it rides up and you can add weedguard and wing... 
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • stussingstussing Posts: 85 Greenhorn
    Capt LeMay,  I think that clouser looks easy enough that I could tie a decent one.
  • CWFliesCWFlies StuartPosts: 85 Deckhand
    They'll  get bit... 

    Here's a homegrown clouser that we use a bunch in the interior of the brackish Everglades out of Flamingo and Chokoloskee...  Tied up on a Mustad #34007 2/0 - note the wire weedguard... Here's the Whitewater Clouser.

    Thread is Danville's flat waxed nylon, fl. green,  and this bug is tied up the way Lefty Kreh suggested all those years ago with all of the wing on one side of the hook... My anglers have taken everything that swims with this pattern - except tarpon...  In forty years of tossing flies at fish - never the first tarpon on a clouser - don't ask me why.  Fortunately, we've got plenty of stuff they will eat.... The eyes are large beadchain (the exact same size the pull cord on vertical blinds come with...).  The body, what there is of it is just two layers of flat waxed nylon in fl. fire orange and the first step is to tie the eyes in place then extend that orange thread back onto the shank about 1/2 inch... then whip finish tying off,  then turning the hook in the vise so that it rides up and you can add weedguard and wing... 
    Now that I think about it I am not sure I have ever hooked a tarpon on a clouser either. Caught a bunch on woolly buggers but I don't think ever on the clouser. Now I have a goal for this year. 

    I always liked this style of closuer more then having the material on the underside of the hook. With the beadchain its great of docklight snookin, and bass love it.
Sign In or Register to comment.