Secret holes and locations

  Secret holes and locations may apply for offshore
but its a myth when it comes to inshore and backcountry.
  Being in three ft.of water,factors such as tide,barometer,
salinity,current,water temp,bait,moon phase are all
 factors that affect fishing.It may not apply to all fish
but certainly applies to tarpon,snook,reds and trout.
     So the key to catching more fish is study why you
caught or did not catch fish.Was it H or L tide,was there
current,what was water temp,was there bait around and
what was the moonphase.

Replies

  • Wra22Wra22 Posts: 166 Deckhand
    I know snook have a seasonal migration pattern, but Do you guys think large snook move very far on a day to day or tide to tide basis?
  • 1outlaw1outlaw Naples FLPosts: 1,182 Officer
    Wra22 said:
    I know snook have a seasonal migration pattern, but Do you guys think large snook move very far on a day to day or tide to tide basis?
    I have always been told that the snook move further in during the colder months. I tend to catch larger snook (35"+) during those months on the outside islands? .
    Jason :USA
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 3,574 Captain
    Their moves for reds, snook and trout are pretty gradual (as fall starts water temps dropping...) compared to tarpon that can move ten miles in an afternoon...  I figure that at low tide - they're not far from where they want to be at high tide - but can't tell you how many times I've seen weekenders working a spot at low tide that I know doesn't have one fish on it... Five or six hours later when the tide is high (or almost there...) that spot will absolutely be worth working... I figure that there are so many variables that influence fish movements and when they'll be on the feed that many days you just can't be sure - so you end up doing a lot more "prospecting" than you'd like to...

    By the way... that push of fish from the coast back up into the interior is a long slow process - that never stops as water temps keep dropping... Places that don't have much in the way of action up inside might just turn golden a few weeks later... The later in winter it is the farther up inside I expect to find them - but that's just me...  Come spring time as water temps start to rise (and we finally get a bit of rain...) the process reverses...

    Of course the folks who've spent their entire lives chasing fish in the 'glades - won't be heard from here at all... I figure that I'm still learning after 45 years or so since I didn't grow up here...
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • Saltwater JunkieSaltwater Junkie Posts: 1,086 Officer
    The beautiful thing about the backcountry is that it's always changing. If you've spent a longtime fishing the glades backcountry I'm sure you've seen islands and points disappear. Now a days the offshore structures get a tremendous amount of fishing pressure or they breaks down or get moved by hurricanes. The number of birds today are nothing compared to the clouds of birds that we use to see. Regardless the Glades are my favorite place to fish. 

    Anyone can have a good day. However to do it consistently regardless of the time of year and weather. You have to pay your dues...Time and plenty of gas over the years. You'll have a many successful trips and will be rewarded in catching fish all the time. Just like Capt. Bob Lemay. 

        
  • 10kman10kman Posts: 572 Officer
      Well said Saltwater Junkie and Captain Lemay!
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 3,574 Captain
    Just checked again this morning - still not the first sign of water temps dropping (come on weather man/lady give us a break...).  We're still in the low eighties for water temps (and this should have started cooling a week ago..). Oh well, mother nature is at it again... 

    For those wanting to monitor water temps in the 'glades and other places around the state.... here's the site I use...  https://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/maps/Florida.shtml

    There's some tricks to using the site.... The first chart you see is only the beginning - after choosing the site closest to where you're going... you'll see a second chart come up on that same screen - and each of the spots actually does have its own water temp info (as well as other data...).  Your tax dollars at work, and very handy for trip planning in cooler months.... I don't pay any attention to water temps once things warm up - except when it's so hot that nothing bites in the afternoon that isn't in a deep channel or hole somewhere....
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • Saltwater JunkieSaltwater Junkie Posts: 1,086 Officer
    Just checked again this morning - still not the first sign of water temps dropping (come on weather man/lady give us a break...).  We're still in the low eighties for water temps (and this should have started cooling a week ago..). Oh well, mother nature is at it again... 

    For those wanting to monitor water temps in the 'glades and other places around the state.... here's the site I use...  https://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/maps/Florida.shtml

    There's some tricks to using the site.... The first chart you see is only the beginning - after choosing the site closest to where you're going... you'll see a second chart come up on that same screen - and each of the spots actually does have its own water temp info (as well as other data...).  Your tax dollars at work, and very handy for trip planning in cooler months.... I don't pay any attention to water temps once things warm up - except when it's so hot that nothing bites in the afternoon that isn't in a deep channel or hole somewhere....
    Bob, I surprised you don't do this. It worked for me when I was guiding. But them again I can understand you don't want to let out any guide secrets.

    On those super hot days where you have to run the boat to cool off. The water is so hot that the fish aren't biting. I would just show them my cooler, and let them know how much nicer it was in there compared to that hot water they're in that also full of Sharks. 
  • BobberBobber Posts: 943 Officer
    Just to throw a little gas on the fire with snook migration, not all of them move east with dropping water temps, some go West to nearshore ledges and reefs - you catch a shiny silver big girl in Jan/Feb on the outside points on a warm pattern of days then you've got an offshore snook. There's a lot of them out there.

    Or maybe I'm just making this up,trying to move a few boats away from my back country spots in the winter......
  • Turner River TerrorTurner River Terror Posts: 7,148 Admiral
    edited October 2019 #10
    When Hurricane Andrew went thru Flamingo and closed it down for Months...That spelled the end of Wild Backcountry around Chokoloskee ..That and Kayaks..and good Bug Spray..and Fancy Electronics...

    Killin and Grillin :grin
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