Newbie in the Spartina Grass..

When today on a high Tide..Yates Creek North of Keyton Beach.
Google Earth  some Rock bars and off I went.
Tide was too high to really spot or work the Bars so I ended up tight inside the Grass line. 
Ballyhoo..Boy was I surprised..Lot's of them in a foot of water.
Now I've caught plenty of them over the Patch Reefs in the Keys and Bahamas for Sails and Dolphin...20 to 30 Ft...What the heck are they doing in a foot ?

Anyways all I saw was a 30 pound Red..Glad he didn't hit cause I'd still be there fighting him on 12 pound line.
Will more Reds invade the Grass as it cools off ?
I Really like Sight fishing and I'm hoping it get's busy in the Grass.
BTW , A First today. I was moving about a mile to other Bars so I just slow trolled a gold spoon and caught 1 Red and 2 Trout easing along eating lunch.
One day I'm gonna be a Guide...winning..
Killin and Grillin :grin

Replies

  • LTownSteveLTownSteve Lakeland/YankeetownPosts: 13 Greenhorn
    Are you sure they weren't needlefish?
  • Salty Dawg44Salty Dawg44 Homosassa, FLPosts: 1,053 Officer
    edited October 9 #3
    When I lived Edisto Island in South Carolina, the marsh grass flats stretched from my property clear to the horizon. On a full moon tide in the fall (we called them Marsh Hen tides because that's when we hunted them), The Redfish would come up onto the flooded marsh to feed on the Fiddler Crabs.


     
     They could be spotted tailing as they sucked the crabs out of their burrows. The marsh was hard bottom (except by the many small creeks) and easy to walk and cast to them. We only had about an hour to fish before the tide began to drop. As soon as it changed, the fish would quit feeding and head straight back to the creeks. With a 7 foot tidal range, It would go down fast. I think my dog had as much fun with them as I did. He would charge out and flush them. He never got one, but never gave up either. 



    MY WORST FEAR......THAT WHEN I DIE MY WIFE WILL SELL ALL MY BOATS & FISHING GEAR FOR WHAT I TOLD HER I PAID FOR IT.......

    I may not always agree with what you say,
    but I will always respect your right to be wrong!
  • Turner River TerrorTurner River Terror Posts: 6,808 Admiral
    I thought so at first as well..never seen Ballyhoo in tight like that.
    Cast netted some a few weeks ago..And their Ballyhoo....
    Killin and Grillin :grin
  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 10,470 AG
    different ballyhoo than down south, found that out tryig to sell them some 30 years back..
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • navigator2navigator2 Posts: 22,472 AG
    When today on a high Tide..Yates Creek North of Keyton Beach.
    Google Earth  some Rock bars and off I went.
    Tide was too high to really spot or work the Bars so I ended up tight inside the Grass line. 
    Ballyhoo..Boy was I surprised..Lot's of them in a foot of water.
    Now I've caught plenty of them over the Patch Reefs in the Keys and Bahamas for Sails and Dolphin...20 to 30 Ft...What the heck are they doing in a foot ?

    Anyways all I saw was a 30 pound Red..Glad he didn't hit cause I'd still be there fighting him on 12 pound line.
    Will more Reds invade the Grass as it cools off ?
    I Really like Sight fishing and I'm hoping it get's busy in the Grass.
    BTW , A First today. I was moving about a mile to other Bars so I just slow trolled a gold spoon and caught 1 Red and 2 Trout easing along eating lunch.
    One day I'm gonna be a Guide...winning..
    The reds move up into the grass around April when the water first starts warming up. They've been there all summer. They now have begun their march into the creeks as of last week. I guess it's something to do with shortening of the days and time of year, because the water is still very warm. The reds and drum are in that grass mostly to eat snails at high tide. If you take a look, the snails leave the mud and climb the green spartina stalks with the rising water. The fiddlers bury up. That's when the fish go in there to whack those snails, like a monkey picking up pecans.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • surfmansurfman WC FLPosts: 5,981 Admiral
    I've seen them too but they are never very big, only abut 6" max. the ones I've seen anyway.

    In the winter I have slow trolled a jig in the deep canals here in Tampa Bay (Apollo Beach Area), worked pretty good for trout.
    Tight Lines, Steve
    My posts are my opinion only.

    Be thankful we're not getting all the government we're paying for.  Will Rogers
  • SaltygatorvetSaltygatorvet TallahasseePosts: 3,921 Captain
    edited October 9 #8
    They aren’t ballyhoo. They don’t come this far north. They look like ballyhoo but smaller. Can’t remember the name off hand, but not ballyhoo. 
    You should have been here yesterday
  • SaltygatorvetSaltygatorvet TallahasseePosts: 3,921 Captain
    ANUMBER1 said:
    different ballyhoo than down south, found that out tryig to sell them some 30 years back..
    Sorry, didn’t see this
    You should have been here yesterday
  • butchbalbutchbal Posts: 450 Deckhand
    edited October 9 #10
    Balao halfbeak. Great kingfish and spanish bait. 


  • SaltygatorvetSaltygatorvet TallahasseePosts: 3,921 Captain
    balao, that’s it. Thanks Butch, trying to remember that name was driving me crazy
    You should have been here yesterday
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 11,138 AG
    I saw those a couple weeks ago out in about 26 FOW.   next time i'm going to castnet some and drop em down. 
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
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