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This is one dumb law for size limit of bass

Took my wife for a drive to a wine tasting store in Island Grove.  The store was located near the southern border of Lochloosa Lake. After she was done tasting her 6 free samples of wine we drove to the lake.   The place I checked out the lake was  2 1/2 miles drive down a sand road. This sign greeted me when I exit the car.
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So according to Florida Laws I could keep 2 three inch bass, 1 four inch one, a 5 inch one, and the big one of the day a 6 inch one.  A great meal there.  Sorry but I think there should be a minimum size limit like 10 -12 inches.  I don't fish for bass that often but when I do it catch and release only.  Give them a chance to grow up.  I have seen people keeping very small bass several times  Their bucket looks like it have a few more than 5 in them.

  Lochloosa Lake is beautiful.

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Image may contain cloud sky tree outdoor nature and water

Replies

  • Reel TealReel Teal Posts: 3,927 Captain
    Its a management technique. This is actually leaving the larger more mature ones to breed and make more bass to catch and release, instead of being removed.
  • JonsredfishinJonsredfishin Posts: 2,103 Captain
    edited July 2019 #3
    Moon, You need to read some of the recent reports regarding those lakes.  Dumb law makes sense to me. Every Yankee bass fisherman dreams of coming to Florida to get one for the wall. The recent success also has a lot to do with FWC not nuking the hydrilla YET as they have done the last several years. 

    Picture below was from Lochloosa last week  

    http://www.garystacklebox.com/blog/
    One president put a man on the moon.
    Another president put a man in the Lady's bathroom.
  • Doc StressorDoc Stressor Homosassa, FLPosts: 2,648 Captain
    Although it sounds counter-intuitive, it is an accepted and effective fisheries management technique.  Since the natural mortality rate of small fish is very high anyway, you can take out a larger percentage of the smaller fish without significantly affecting the population.  Fish like bass typically produce many more offspring than their environment can support. So removing some of the smaller fish just increases the probability that the remaining fish will survive and grow larger.
  • Quad32xQuad32x Anthony , FloridaPosts: 305 Deckhand
    That is a beautiful place. 
  • 4WARD4WARD Cross Creek,FLPosts: 1,996 Captain
    So how did she rate the blueberry wine?
    "I hate graveyards and old pawn shops
    For they always bring me tears
    I can't forgive the way they rob me
    Of my childhood souvenirs"... John Prine
  • Moon ShadowMoon Shadow Posts: 1,008 Officer
    4WARD said:
    So how did she rate the blueberry wine?
    She liked it but I believe she brought the Mix Berry.


  • 4WARD4WARD Cross Creek,FLPosts: 1,996 Captain
    4WARD said:
    So how did she rate the blueberry wine?
    She liked it but I believe she brought the Mix Berry.


    Keepin momma happy! That’s a good thing 👍
    "I hate graveyards and old pawn shops
    For they always bring me tears
    I can't forgive the way they rob me
    Of my childhood souvenirs"... John Prine
  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 10,291 Moderator
    edited July 2019 #9
    I spoke to the biologist at the Richloam hatchery before the rule went into effect. They state the smaller bass, while not only better and safer to eat, will compete for available forage. Taking the mid size breeders out allowed the small bass to over populate and exploit the young of the year forage. Depleting the forage base for larger fish before the bait could get larger.

    Puts more trophy fish in the water and according to surveys that were sent out (I filled out several) it was what anglers wanted when bass fishing. More quality size bass.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • mburke001 aka TripleBmburke001 aka TripleB Posts: 1,536 Captain
    I don't fish lakes, don't like bugs, does anyone eat the fish from the lakes in Inverness etc? 

  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 10,291 Moderator
    I don't fish lakes, don't like bugs, does anyone eat the fish from the lakes in Inverness etc? 
    They been eating fish from these lakes for centuries. Half a century for me . LOL
    Mostly panfish but have eat my share of bass and catfish. Totally safe , especially the smaller fish.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • Moon ShadowMoon Shadow Posts: 1,008 Officer
    edited July 2019 #12
    My point is true, people come to Florida in hope to catch a trophy bass, 10 lbs or more,  But they are few and far between. I know one fisherman that fish for bass for 20 years and got only one that was over 10 lbs to show for a couple hundreds of trips. Wish I could catch one that big. On most trip I read about the catch rate on a good day is 4 or 5 bass and most of them are small bass around 14 inches and under.

    Ohio where I came from years ago have a size limit I believe was 8 inches and most lakes it was 16 inches and a few 18 inch minimum size limit.   If I didn't catch a dozen, any size, or so per trip it was a disappointing trip.  Here because of people keeping small bass the catch rate is small per trip.  I know Florida trying to get the tourist to come down here and spend hundreds of dollars in hope of catching a trophy   My personnel best is a 8 pound bass and that was my only bass in 6 hours of casting at Rodman and it was caught on the second rod with a shiner on it.  My brother-in-law a great bass fisherman caught 3.  I know what you thinking I am a rotten bass fisherman.  But no I found a book where I kept record of trips in Ohio.  One trip 85 -1 to 4 lbs .bass caught in four hours, using a home made spinner tipped with a night crawler,  with my son. On another  trip 50 bass any size, caught in 3 hours and several 30 plus trips.  On Lake Erie, back 20 years ago it was common with 3 in the boat to catch over a hundred small mouths per trip. Size limit 12 inches. True I had bad days in the middle of the summer and caught few if any.    I can see why Florida like to get rid of the small bass so the others can get bigger.  Fished one small lake in Ohio where because of a size limit of 12 inches it was loaded with bass that were all 10 inches or under, they were all 10 inches.  Not enough food for them to get bigger.  If you drain the whole lake there probably  be only a few over 10 inches.
  • Reel TealReel Teal Posts: 3,927 Captain
    edited July 2019 #13
    I dont see how what your lake in ohio 20 years ago has anything to do with the management technique implemented a few years ago here in Florida. Keep fishing. The bass arent all gone. Nor are they all small. The big ones are all swimming around because no one can keep them.
  • Moon ShadowMoon Shadow Posts: 1,008 Officer
    Reel Teal said:
    I dont see how what your lake in ohio 20 years ago has anything to do with the management technique implemented a few years ago here in Florida. Keep fishing. The bass arent all gone. Nor are they all small. The big ones are all swimming around because no one can keep them.
     I agree they should released all the bigger bass but some people keep 6 inch bass and that is what I disagree with.  They can't be that hungry.
  • Doc StressorDoc Stressor Homosassa, FLPosts: 2,648 Captain
    Let me try to explain it in a different way:

    Big bass and little bass eat different things.  If there is only enough food to support 10,000 small bass in a lake and there are 100,000 of them in a given year, taking 90,000 of them out of the population will have no effect on the number that will mature into big bass.  In fact, it will allow them to grow bigger faster.

    You also can't compare management techniques for mostly oligotrophic northern lakes with the highly nutrient-enriched Florida waterways.  Minimum size limits were the traditional way to manage fish.  What we have learned is that this practice often results in populations with stunted fish.  When fish reach a certain density they produce chemical signals that inhibit the growth of members of that same species. 

    The decline in the number of trophy bass in Florida is less well understood.  There is some concern that the frequency of the genes for large size may have been reduced by folks keeping most trophy bass in the past.  


  • Reel TealReel Teal Posts: 3,927 Captain
    Those some people are following the law. People eat anchovies and smelt and they're even smaller.  The good thing is you dont have to keep them if you dont want to. 

    By the way, how was the hydrilla and other SAV looking?
  • Jim311Jim311 Posts: 4,961 Captain
    The way I figure it the type of person who keeps an 8 inch was probably going to keep it whether the rules said they could or not. I've fished a few private lakes where keeping bass is against the rules and those are the lakes that are always full of fish that are malnourished because theyre competing hard for food.
  • mburke001 aka TripleBmburke001 aka TripleB Posts: 1,536 Captain
    I don't fish lakes, don't like bugs, does anyone eat the fish from the lakes in Inverness etc? 
    They been eating fish from these lakes for centuries. Half a century for me . LOL
    Mostly panfish but have eat my share of bass and catfish. Totally safe , especially the smaller fish.
    Thanks Capt. Friend of mine just bought a house in Henderson and he was told that no one eats the fish from the lake. I guess the people on that lake only eat flounder or shrimp from a fast food chain 😂. 
  • Moon ShadowMoon Shadow Posts: 1,008 Officer
    Moon Shadow s    I can see why Florida like to get rid of the small bass so the others can get bigger.  Fished one small lake in Ohio where because of a size limit of 12 inches it was loaded with bass that were all 10 inches or under, they were all 10 inches.  Not enough food for them to get bigger.  If you drain the whole lake there probably  be only a few over 10 inches.
    I agree with all of you.  This is the last few lines of my quote showing that all the bass were never going to get any bigger for lack of enough food to eat in this small lake.  They needed to let people keep the smaller bass to thin them out so they could grow bigger.
  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 10,291 Moderator
    ^^^ this ^^^  Especially in a small water environment. Good job.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • THINKICANTHINKICAN Homosassa, FLPosts: 572 Officer
    All this talk of eating fish!  I was under the impression that fresh water fishers were out there to see the beautiful sights and commune with nature and that the "catching" part was just a bonus!  LOL!  Actually, I believe most of the really large bass are caught from small ponds on private property.  That's been my experience from when I used to bass fish.
    SO WHEN IS THIS "OLD ENOUGH TO KNOW BETTER" SUPPOSED TO KICK IN?
  • LostconchLostconch Posts: 711 Officer
    That sign has been there for over a year
     It is a nice spot. We stop there when traveling north or south on 301
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