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Why is scalloping season in the summer time?

EnyarEnyar Posts: 101 Deckhand
I must be missing something here. From what I understand, scallops in FL generally spawn in the fall as temps decrease, after they are approximately 1 year old. Because of the spawning process, scallops rarely survive and make it another year. 

My question is why is scalloping season in the summer time? In my mind, scallop spawns will begin the process in the fall, grow throughout the year until they reach fall the following year and then the process starts over.

If we're harvesting in the summer time aren't we severely limited the fall spawn every year? Wouldn't it make more sense to harvest in the winter time when they've already spawned and you're picking off the scallop that are probably going to die anyway?

Replies

  • Rich MRich M Posts: 1,326 Officer
    Salmon swim upriver, spawn and die.  

    So the eggs get released in Say October, then the little ones grow up to spawning size by September, then spawn and die.  Few if any adults will make it into the winter if they die due to the rigors of spawning.  Scallops and fish and such tend to release lots and lots of eggs so a smaller number of mature scallops can produce a lot of little scallops.

    The season is timed so folks can find some that should be big enough to eat, before they spawn and die.  

    Did that help?
  • EnyarEnyar Posts: 101 Deckhand
    Rich M said:
    Salmon swim upriver, spawn and die.  

    So the eggs get released in Say October, then the little ones grow up to spawning size by September, then spawn and die.  Few if any adults will make it into the winter if they die due to the rigors of spawning.  Scallops and fish and such tend to release lots and lots of eggs so a smaller number of mature scallops can produce a lot of little scallops.

    The season is timed so folks can find some that should be big enough to eat, before they spawn and die.  

    Did that help?
    So all the scallops we catch have never spawned and what's caught the next year are just the spawns of the ones that we missed?

    And that's enough to sustain the fishery? Seems like they get so much harder now (compared to even 5 years ago) that I wonder if it's sustainable.
  • Grouper GeniusGrouper Genius Posts: 1,482 Officer
    Maybe season only on odd number years?
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  • EnyarEnyar Posts: 101 Deckhand
    Maybe season only on odd number years?
    I was thinking that but it would be too much of a hit to local economies. I was thinking odd years only boats with odd FL numbers and even years only boats with even FL numbers. Still sounds like a nightmare for enforcement. 
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 3,991 Captain
    Seasons - for everything are guided by the marine biologists on the FWC's staff... Occasionally their recommendations aren't followed and/or politics rules -but that's the exception rather than the rule from what I've seen...

    In general the FWC is doing an outstanding job - compared to the situation we faced all those years ago when I first started paying attention (late seventies...) - and we lost specie after specie to rules that allowed commercial harvest at the expense of the fisheries - over and over again...

    I'd never want to see us go back to the days before the FWC.... period.

    Now it's up to all of us to do what the FWC can't do - and that's repair our sad water situation all around the state...

    That one factor is the real threat to our fisheries (and the lifestyle of everyone that lives in our state...) in  every sense of the word.  It will take a ton of money and years to overcome the mistakes in past years.. We're literally 80 years late on this topic and it will take all of us to keep our local and state governments doing the necessary....  I won't live long enough to see much more than a beginning - but just maybe my seven grandkids might -if we get started and keep our eyes on the prize.... 

    Pay attention to the Coastal Conservation Association and Captains for Clean Waters - both outfits know what needs doing.  If anyone knows of other outfits on the right side of things - speak up.  We can use all the help we can get...



    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • MRichardsonMRichardson Posts: 10,438 AG

    Now it's up to all of us to do what the FWC can't do - and that's repair our sad water situation all around the state...

    That one factor is the real threat to our fisheries (and the lifestyle of everyone that lives in our state...) in  every sense of the word.  It will take a ton of money and years to overcome the mistakes in past years.. We're literally 80 years late on this topic and it will take all of us to keep our local and state governments doing the necessary....  I won't live long enough to see much more than a beginning - but just maybe my seven grandkids might -if we get started and keep our eyes on the prize.... 

    Yep.  This is the overarching threat that will not go away, or be "managed" by limits, seasons, etc.  We could close everything down and still lose the majority of our game/fish.  And I really do believe that this is what will happen. It's already happened over much of the east coast for inshore anglers.
    I have never seen live bones, but I know that they are often used by rich people to decorate the interior.
  • biglarbiglar Posts: 183 Deckhand
    I'm not completely certain on this, so please take it easy on the flaming.  Can't speak for Scallops, but I do know that after Oysters spawn, they lose a lot and get watery and tasteless.  Not worth the effort of getting them.  Wouldn't surprise me if Scallops are similar in that.
  • EnyarEnyar Posts: 101 Deckhand
    biglar said:
    I'm not completely certain on this, so please take it easy on the flaming.  Can't speak for Scallops, but I do know that after Oysters spawn, they lose a lot and get watery and tasteless.  Not worth the effort of getting them.  Wouldn't surprise me if Scallops are similar in that.
    Fair point, so maybe that's why the season is when it is. Just seems odd that we're allowed to hit them so hard. We usually go a few times a year and by the end of the season they are definitely few and far inbetween. 
  • EnyarEnyar Posts: 101 Deckhand

    Now it's up to all of us to do what the FWC can't do - and that's repair our sad water situation all around the state...

    That one factor is the real threat to our fisheries (and the lifestyle of everyone that lives in our state...) in  every sense of the word.  It will take a ton of money and years to overcome the mistakes in past years.. We're literally 80 years late on this topic and it will take all of us to keep our local and state governments doing the necessary....  I won't live long enough to see much more than a beginning - but just maybe my seven grandkids might -if we get started and keep our eyes on the prize.... 

    Yep.  This is the overarching threat that will not go away, or be "managed" by limits, seasons, etc.  We could close everything down and still lose the majority of our game/fish.  And I really do believe that this is what will happen. It's already happened over much of the east coast for inshore anglers.
    Agree. Unfortunately I don't think our $$ has a shot in hell against the $$$$$ of development and capitalism. Our best shot is education so that people make smarter decisions with their wallet and at the polling booth. Not sure which organization is best for that.
  • EnyarEnyar Posts: 101 Deckhand
    Seasons - for everything are guided by the marine biologists on the FWC's staff... Occasionally their recommendations aren't followed and/or politics rules -but that's the exception rather than the rule from what I've seen...

    In general the FWC is doing an outstanding job - compared to the situation we faced all those years ago when I first started paying attention (late seventies...) - and we lost specie after specie to rules that allowed commercial harvest at the expense of the fisheries - over and over again...

    I'd never want to see us go back to the days before the FWC.... period.

    Now it's up to all of us to do what the FWC can't do - and that's repair our sad water situation all around the state...

    That one factor is the real threat to our fisheries (and the lifestyle of everyone that lives in our state...) in  every sense of the word.  It will take a ton of money and years to overcome the mistakes in past years.. We're literally 80 years late on this topic and it will take all of us to keep our local and state governments doing the necessary....  I won't live long enough to see much more than a beginning - but just maybe my seven grandkids might -if we get started and keep our eyes on the prize.... 

    Pay attention to the Coastal Conservation Association and Captains for Clean Waters - both outfits know what needs doing.  If anyone knows of other outfits on the right side of things - speak up.  We can use all the help we can get...



    I agree 100%. Another helpful organization at least in the Tampa Bay area is Tampa Bay Watch. I really love their model.

    CCA gets some of my money as well but I do cringe a little every time they post about politics. I stopped supporting Sierra Club for that reason....hope CCA wisens up.
  • Reel TealReel Teal Posts: 3,962 Captain
    Sierra club is the worst. Better to support groups who support your recreation instead of oppose it. CCA definitely walks a thin line on some issues there. Though the gulf coast loves that org. I can see no more scalloping very soon.
  • PicmanPicman Posts: 312 Deckhand
    Better question,Why are every red snapper full of roe now?
  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 11,698 AG
    I think we need a commercial bycatch harvest of scallops after the rec season is over, they are spawning and dying so what's the harm?
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • Grouper GeniusGrouper Genius Posts: 1,482 Officer
    ANUMBER1 said:
    I think we need a commercial bycatch harvest of scallops after the rec season is over, they are spawning and dying so what's the harm?
    Would commercial drag nets for them? How does that work?
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    Grady White 306 Bimini 300 Suzukis
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  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 11,698 AG
    ANUMBER1 said:
    I think we need a commercial bycatch harvest of scallops after the rec season is over, they are spawning and dying so what's the harm?
    Would commercial drag nets for them? How does that work



    Shrimp boat by catch
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • Grouper GeniusGrouper Genius Posts: 1,482 Officer
    ANUMBER1 said:
    ANUMBER1 said:
    I think we need a commercial bycatch harvest of scallops after the rec season is over, they are spawning and dying so what's the harm?
    Would commercial drag nets for them? How does that work



    Shrimp boat by catch
    Makes sense.
    2400 CC Sea Chaser-Yamaha F250-Bad **** Tower (SOLD)
    Grady White 306 Bimini 300 Suzukis
    Hurricane 246 FunDeck
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