Red Tide

permit_mepermit_me Posts: 1,043 Officer
Red tide seems to be analogous to wildfires. Wildfires, or more specifically, natural fire cycles vary (for example - slash pine/palmetto scrub burns every few years, where as scrub habitats, incl. sand pine,  burn naturally every 50-60 yrs or so.)  these fires are needed to break dormancy of seeds, clean out debris and invasive/competitive organisms - restore the ecosystem, provide balance. wildfires cleanup what we wont allow to occur on a natural cycle (bad forestry policies) where ecosystems are outta balance, for one reason or another.
Red tide feeds on blooms of organisms (such as trichodesmium) that occur where concentrations of nitrogen/runoff/sewage, etc concentrate.  It is quite possible this is needed to clean up out *$%# and provide opportunity for reestablishing the natural ecosystem.  
So looking at the entire ecological picture, is battling red tide as an organism rather than limiting the causes of other harmful (cyano-)bacterial and algal blooms. We do know what causes them, but choose to ignore the science. 

Replies

  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 20,199 AG
    The know causes and the fixes are well know...it is the associated costs to change what we have done in Florida for the past 75 years that is the limiting factor. 
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 10,553 AG
    Huh?

    I have yet to see any king of FIX for red tide..

    Please enlighten me.
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 1,697 Captain
    I don't know of any conclusive determinations of the cause, of the massive persistent blooms we're seeing
  • SaltygatorvetSaltygatorvet TallahasseePosts: 4,016 Captain
    It has been determined that the blue green algae will fix the nitrogen that helps k brevis bloom
    You should have been here yesterday
  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 20,199 AG
    Red tide is naturally occurring....the "super blooms" that last YEARS are not...

    They have been linked to blue green algae 
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • pottydocpottydoc The thriving metropolis of Umatilla Posts: 3,500 Captain
    duckmanJR said:
    Red tide is naturally occurring....the "super blooms" that last YEARS are not...

    They have been linked to blue green algae 
    Care to back that up with something that had been proven?
  • KlingerKlinger Posts: 1,867 Captain
    Just to be clear, the best way to manage pine forests whether it's planted or natural, is with a good prescribed burning program. Prescribed burning reduces hardwood competition, reduces threats from insects, &  increases usable browse for wildlife.  If you wait for a wildfire,  you're usually looking at scorched earth. I really doubt that fires,  regardless of whether it's prescribed or a wildfire,  will have much meaningful impact on red tide 
    In my many years, I have come to a conclusion that one useless man is a shame,two is a law firm, and three or more is a congress.-- John Adams
  • Doc StressorDoc Stressor Homosassa, FLPosts: 2,516 Captain
    Trichodesmium doesn't feed on pollution.  It is a natural nitrogen fixer that is often associated with the early stages of an offshore red tide blooms.  K. brevis can utilize the nitrogen from the atmosphere after it is converted to a usable form by Trichodesmium.  It is possible that the persistence of a red tide can be extended by the presence of pollution resulting from human activity since there is evidence that red tide outbreaks are increasing in intensity and duration. But correlation with human activity (high levels of nutrients in freshwater runoff) doesn't prove causality. This is being actively studies and it takes a long time to accumulate enough data to draw conclusions. There are enough other reasons to curb nutrient runoff that it is not necessary to invoke it as the cause of severe red tide outbreaks. 
  • pottydocpottydoc The thriving metropolis of Umatilla Posts: 3,500 Captain
    edited May 24 #10
    Thanks Doc. 

    Doc knows his stuff on this, guys. It may be proven that thevrunoffs actually do have some connection to red tide someday, but there’s nothing now. And, as a Doc said, we have plenty of other reasons to work hard to get the runoffs stopped without even considering red tide. 
  • mplspugmplspug Palmetto FloridaPosts: 9,171 Admiral
    I agree wholeheartedly.  We can address the runoff issue without muddling it with the red tide issues that can prove to be counter productive as stating it as an absolute. The same thing happens with climate change when they appropriate weather occurrences to it. 

    Captain Todd Approves

  • MRichardsonMRichardson Posts: 9,327 Admiral
    How did forests and wildlife manage themselves before people came along?


    I have never seen live bones, but I know that they are often used by rich people to decorate the interior.
  • mplspugmplspug Palmetto FloridaPosts: 9,171 Admiral
    They would burn...out of control*.

    *See California Wildfires

    Captain Todd Approves

  • pottydocpottydoc The thriving metropolis of Umatilla Posts: 3,500 Captain
    Not a good example. If California would allow their forestry services to do controlled burns, they’d have way less rally bad wildfires. Florida needs to do the same thing.
  • KlingerKlinger Posts: 1,867 Captain
    edited May 29 #15
    pottydoc said:
    Not a good example. If California would allow their forestry services to do controlled burns, they’d have way less rally bad wildfires. Florida needs to do the same thing.
    Most of the intensely managed private land as well as much of the state and national forest land in Florida is on a burning plan.   Before man assumed he knew everything and protected the forest from fire,  most of the upland pine stands would burn routinely. If it burns routinely,  the fuel doesn't get heavy enough to do any damage to pines  (especially longleaf and slash pines)
    In my many years, I have come to a conclusion that one useless man is a shame,two is a law firm, and three or more is a congress.-- John Adams
  • pottydocpottydoc The thriving metropolis of Umatilla Posts: 3,500 Captain
    Yup, I know all of that. I also know that a whole lot doesn’t get burned as much as needed because the people that live in those areas don’t like the smoke, or seeing burned trees. You can’t tell them it’s good for the forest, they know better than any State employee, no matter what kind of experience and education he has. 
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