Corrosion On New Trailer?

james 14james 14 Posts: 3,001 Moderator
This looks to me like the beginning of corrosion on my aluminum i-beams. If so, what the heck could be going on?


Replies

  • Salty Dawg44Salty Dawg44 Homosassa, FLPosts: 1,067 Officer
    Aluminum forms an oxide coating that protects it. You can either leave it, or remove it with a rag soaked in vinegar.

    MY WORST FEAR......THAT WHEN I DIE MY WIFE WILL SELL ALL MY BOATS & FISHING GEAR FOR WHAT I TOLD HER I PAID FOR IT.......

    I may not always agree with what you say,
    but I will always respect your right to be wrong!
  • surfmansurfman WC FLPosts: 5,981 Admiral
    Looks pretty good to me, almost like a brand new trailer. Surely you don't expect it to be shinny forever. I am assuming you use it right?
    Tight Lines, Steve
    My posts are my opinion only.

    Be thankful we're not getting all the government we're paying for.  Will Rogers
  • gandrfabgandrfab Posts: 20,959 AG
    I have heard good reports about sharkhide on raw aluminum. 

    http://www.sharkhide.com/


    Gestapo 

  • finbullyfinbully Posts: 664 Officer
    Normal. No need to worry as long as the hardware is SS.
  • james 14james 14 Posts: 3,001 Moderator
    surfman said:
    Looks pretty good to me, almost like a brand new trailer. Surely you don't expect it to be shinny forever. I am assuming you use it right?
    I'm talking about the little spots which look to me like corrosion starting to form. Yes, it's brand new and, no, I don't expect it to be shiny but I also don't expect it to destroy itself sitting in my garage.
  • james 14james 14 Posts: 3,001 Moderator
    finbully said:
    Normal. No need to worry as long as the hardware is SS.
    Bolts and such are SS but the axle, brackets and tongue portion are galvanized. I know dissimilar metals can corrode and some guys have had to put rubber spacers in certain places to stop the problem.
  • The Cat's EyeThe Cat's Eye Posts: 1,298 Officer
    If you air dry your trailer traveling home, plain water will not remove salt that has dried on metal. This has been proven in research. To remove air dried saltwater on alum or steel you need to add soap to your wash down system and then rinse the soap off with plain water. 
    Giimoozaabi
  • gandrfabgandrfab Posts: 20,959 AG
    Give it a lick. Does it taste like salt?
    Gestapo 

  • FlecFlec Posts: 596 Officer
    When you rinse it off after a trip, you need to wipe it with a wet sponge or rag and rinse again. Water alone after the salt has dried on it won't cut it, It needs a good wipping as well.
  • FlecFlec Posts: 596 Officer
    Also,,spray the galvanized metal and springs with WD40 every other trip or they will be toast after just 2 years. Aluminum will "pit" if the salt is not removed.
  • polliwogpolliwog Posts: 262 Deckhand
    I have a 15yr old aluminum that gets used all winter, it gets washed down after use and has a haze ,but nothing else.  The frame is aluminum the fittings are galvanized.  U bolts have some surface rust,bit are solid. If your are OCD you can do a major clean up after each use,but that's notfor me. I save my time for the boat.
  • james 14james 14 Posts: 3,001 Moderator
    If you air dry your trailer traveling home, plain water will not remove salt that has dried on metal. This has been proven in research. To remove air dried saltwater on alum or steel you need to add soap to your wash down system and then rinse the soap off with plain water. 
    Thanks, I had no idea. It's only been in the salt once and that was on a test drive with the dealer. I have no idea if they even rinsed the trailer. I've done zero salt water in my own boat so I have a few things to learn. The wind last weekend had us on fresh and a sick kid kept me home today.

    Any need to scrub with the soap? Or just spray on, let sit and spray off?
  • surfmansurfman WC FLPosts: 5,981 Admiral
    It's normal, I wouldn't worry about it.
    Tight Lines, Steve
    My posts are my opinion only.

    Be thankful we're not getting all the government we're paying for.  Will Rogers
  • FlecFlec Posts: 596 Officer
    james 14 said:
    If you air dry your trailer traveling home, plain water will not remove salt that has dried on metal. This has been proven in research. To remove air dried saltwater on alum or steel you need to add soap to your wash down system and then rinse the soap off with plain water. 
    Thanks, I had no idea. It's only been in the salt once and that was on a test drive with the dealer. I have no idea if they even rinsed the trailer. I've done zero salt water in my own boat so I have a few things to learn. The wind last weekend had us on fresh and a sick kid kept me home today.

    Any need to scrub with the soap? Or just spray on, let sit and spray off?

    Yes,,,you need to scrub or wipe with a sponge either with or without soap if the saltwater has had time to dry. I do not use soap.
  • MarkiamMarkiam East Orlando Posts: 21 Greenhorn
    I am OCD about salt. I put an 8 gallon tank with a12volt motor on front of my trailer under winch. The kind of sprayer the lawn care folks use to spray weeds etc.  I get the power from my truck and spray off trailer after boat launch. This trailer does not have brakes but would be extra beneficial if it did. Tank, motor, sprayer less than $100 on Amazon.
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 11,226 AG
    Markiam said:
    I am OCD about salt. I put an 8 gallon tank with a12volt motor on front of my trailer under winch. The kind of sprayer the lawn care folks use to spray weeds etc.  I get the power from my truck and spray off trailer after boat launch. This trailer does not have brakes but would be extra beneficial if it did. Tank, motor, sprayer less than $100 on Amazon.
    that's not a bad idea.  I've got a 3 gallon pump sprayer but i've never brought it to spray off the trailer with.   I know the after the fact rinsing doesn't do as good as hitting it right when you take it out of the water, but aluminum shouldn't corrode from the salt anyway.   
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • SCFD rtrd.SCFD rtrd. Posts: 1,386 Officer

    I think, what you are looking at is dried salt. If you can remove it with your thumb nail, then it is dried salt. Use distilled white vinegar and a sponge to remove the rest.

    Shark Hide is good stuff and will keep your new trailer looking new. I have a 2013 aluminum trailer that looks showroom new. And yes, it does get used. Order Shark Hide and apply as directed. You can use a small paint brush to get into the tight places. Apply two coats, then one coat per year after that. It works on stainless, aluminum and galvanized trailer parts and pieces.

  • james 14james 14 Posts: 3,001 Moderator

    I think, what you are looking at is dried salt. If you can remove it with your thumb nail, then it is dried salt. Use distilled white vinegar and a sponge to remove the rest.

    Shark Hide is good stuff and will keep your new trailer looking new. I have a 2013 aluminum trailer that looks showroom new. And yes, it does get used. Order Shark Hide and apply as directed. You can use a small paint brush to get into the tight places. Apply two coats, then one coat per year after that. It works on stainless, aluminum and galvanized trailer parts and pieces.

    I think you may be correct since I haven't seen it since I've been personally using it and washing it off after each trip. I didn't get Shark Hide but I did get some Aluma Guard and sprayed all aluminum surfaces. One thing is for certain, it's almost impossible to spray down the entirety of a trailer with a bottled product and the places you miss are the most likely to hold salt. A hose and water will always be part of the regimen.
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