Home Northwest General Fishing & The Outdoors

Hunting Norcal

amazingly the weather and land looks a lot like Ga. i think  as conservative too. Goose hunting this a.m. , even got a banded ross. Headed to pheasant  hunt now. 

Replies

  • MulletMullet Posts: 2,408 Moderator
    wild pheasant  can get up and go!
  • CranfieldCranfield Posts: 1,522 Captain
    We need a bit more detail, you hunting fiend.
    I can see you decoyed the geese, but what were the circumstances, it also looks a bit foggy there.
    Where the pheasants walked up, or driven ?

  • ferris1248ferris1248 Posts: 15,437 Moderator
    Inquiring minds want to know.

    "That which is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow. That is the whole of the law. The rest is commentary."

    Rabbi Hillel (c20 BCE)

  • trout069trout069 Posts: 5,450 Admiral
    Likely walked up in NorCal. Cran, what the fire didn’t ruin is quite nice. Except their are mountains. They have wild turkey and hogs also. 
  • MulletMullet Posts: 2,408 Moderator
    rrdCranfield said:
    We need a bit more detail, you hunting fiend.
    I can see you decoyed the geese, but what were the circumstances, it also looks a bit foggy there.
    Where the pheasants walked up, or driven ?

    I was a spectator  and caller this weekend. Had a blast. it was very foggy. We flushed the pheasant  walking. I was a pusher. It was tough hunting as it was very boggy. A very fun time though.
  • CranfieldCranfield Posts: 1,522 Captain
    Thanks for the info, it sounds as though you certainly had some fun.
    We call "pushers", "beaters".
    Most syndicate and commercial shoots here have a regular team of "beaters", who all know their positions and jobs, this makes the shooting day more efficient and enjoyable.
    Beating can be very hard work, depending on the terrain and weather, but they get paid (not a lot) and a days free shooting near the end of the season.
    Good beaters often get lured from one shoot to another with extra wages, they are seen as very valuable commodities.
    After I retired I regularly beat on a Wednesday shoot for about 6 seasons, some of the hardest (and most enjoyable) work I have ever done.
  • MulletMullet Posts: 2,408 Moderator
    it was wet and really dense stuff. quite a workout!
  • CranfieldCranfield Posts: 1,522 Captain
    We tend to think of pheasants as woodland birds, but they are in fact marshland birds, liking boggy, damp ground.
    I am referring to wild birds, bred and released birds tend to live where there are released.
    It certainly makes the going tough and puts pressure on the hamstrings.
    I must confess to spending most hours at the front of the shoot with a gun, waiting for the beaters to push the birds to me.
  • illinoisfishermanillinoisfisherman Posts: 5,347 Admiral
    Pheasant hunting was part of growing up for me. It developed into a kind of "right of passage" for the boys in our family. First as a youngster we walked in a line between adults to help flush birds and learn hunter safety. After a year or two of walking we were given shotguns and the adults allowed us to do the shooting. We had Weimaraner bird dogs mostly but the best dog we had was my English pointer "Duke". He could find birds where the other dogs would miss them. One time, when he was very young, he jumped a fence and went into a ditch that we just walked and refused to come out. Standing on point. I went over the fence to get him and three cocks flushed immediately. They must have doubled back into the brush. The other dogs walked right past them. The farm was loaded with birds so I imagine there was scent everywhere and the Weimaraners didn't pick up on the live birds where we just walked through. I always believed that pheasants were a very intelligent bird or had uncanny instincts. Oh well my walking days are over now, but this thread brought back fond memories of days gone by. Thanks Billy.
  • MulletMullet Posts: 2,408 Moderator
    band info - NEAR CAMBRIDGE BAY, NUNAVUT, CANADA
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Posts: 2,235 Captain
    Ring Neck Pheasants aren't native to the USA, you know. And, these bird's eggs are very sensitive to the angle of the infrared rays of the sun. That's why you don't find 'em in the Southern States though our overall habitat would be good for this bird.
  • dewyafishdewyafish Posts: 5,025 Admiral
    The only thing I know for sure about pheasants is that when one meets your windshield at 60mph the windsheild will break and the pheasant will die.
    There's nothing more enjoyable than suprise morning sex...
    .
    .
    .
    .
    Unless you happen to be in jail at the time.
  • trout069trout069 Posts: 5,450 Admiral
    Ring Neck Pheasants aren't native to the USA, you know. And, these bird's eggs are very sensitive to the angle of the infrared rays of the sun. That's why you don't find 'em in the Southern States though our overall habitat would be good for this bird.
    Yes they do. Still see some when I come up 82 into Madison ga. Not sure if Burnt pine plantation still has release hunting. Knew a fellow in a/c biz who lived in Smyrna ga near power line right of way. He started finding feathers, then started seeing a small flock. He brought me about 4 nice tails for tying pheasant tail nymphs. 
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Posts: 2,235 Captain
    Let me know if you find a nest with CHICKS!
  • SaltygatorvetSaltygatorvet TallahasseePosts: 5,807 Admiral
    Lots of released birds around here. I’ve never heard of anyone seeing a chick 
    You should have been here yesterday
  • swampwalkerswampwalker Posts: 2,359 Captain
    They actually stocked Iranian Pheasants in north Florida in the late 50s early 60s. The birds didn't do well so the game commission pulled the plug on the plan. If I remember correctly it was determined our habitat was unsuitable for pheasants to become established. 
    The original - "Renaissance Redneck"
  • CranfieldCranfield Posts: 1,522 Captain
    Apparently, all pheasant species originated from Asia,  none are native to the western world.
    Our English pheasant is slightly smaller  and darker than its American cousin and does not have the elaborate ring neck.
    Its rare for bred and released birds to be sterile and they do breed normally in the UK.
    For an area to hold a significant number of breeding pairs, there needs to be very effective vermin control. Everything from foxes to crows are enemies of ground nesting birds like pheasant.
    Habitat is also an issue and to hold the numbers to make a commercial shoot feasible, supplementary feeding is essential.
    Pheasants don't naturally flock up, like partridge, ducks, geese, etc., so they need inducements to make them remain in an area in any numbers.
  • trout069trout069 Posts: 5,450 Admiral
    Yes sir , the coyote problem that lies at the feet of fox hunters( the ones on horse back) is one reason if the released birds go native they don’t survive. And fire ants,raptors and man. And now we have armadillos in northeast ga. 
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Posts: 2,235 Captain
    trout, are you talking about Bobwhite Quail or Pheasants?
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Digital Now Included!

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

Preview This Month's Issue

Buy Digital Single Issues

Don't miss an issue.
Buy single digital issue for your phone or tablet.

Buy Single Digital Issue on the Florida Sportsman App

Other Magazines

See All Other Magazines

Special Interest Magazines

See All Special Interest Magazines

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Florida Sportsman stories delivered right to your inbox.

Advertisement

Phone Icon

Get Digital Access.

All Florida Sportsman subscribers now have digital access to their magazine content. This means you have the option to read your magazine on most popular phones and tablets.

To get started, click the link below to visit mymagnow.com and learn how to access your digital magazine.

Get Digital Access

Not a Subscriber?
Subscribe Now