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Target Practice on Private Property - Citrus County

VertigoVertigo Yankeetown, FLPosts: 617 Officer
I own a 2 acre lot in a sparsely populated community of 1+ acre lots in Citrus Co.  Can I legally target shoot on my property, assuming adequate safety precautions are taken, ie. berms and/or sandbags?

Replies

  • surfmansurfman WC FLPosts: 6,008 Admiral
    If you are in the county and not is some deed restricted community then you probably can without any problem.
    Tight Lines, Steve
    My posts are my opinion only.

    Be thankful we're not getting all the government we're paying for.  Will Rogers
  • YakAddictYakAddict Posts: 55 Greenhorn
    Stray projectiles can have ugly unintended consequences.
    2 acres isn't a great deal of space. An acre square is only 209' x 209'. As far as safety is concerned it depends in part on configuration of acreage and type of firearms.
    As far as the law is concerned it would be prudent to contact the Citrus County Sheriffs Office (or whatever the responsible local law enforcement agency) before shooting. Most law enforcement will say ignorance of the law isn't a valid excuse.
    If it be legal (and safe) then be considerate of and courteous to others nearby. I have a neighbor who legally shoots (which I found out after complaining to the Sheriff Dep't.) on most Sundays on and off for 2-4 hours at a time. High-powered and semi-automatic weapons, often after what I consider to be "safe light" (and I am a hunter).  I don't know how he affords the ammo. Sounds like WW III. Makes our horses frantic. And it's annoying.  
  • th19999th19999 Posts: 252 Deckhand
    I agree with yakaddict, call the sheriff or local game warden. Also maybe have him/her meet you at your lot. If you do meet an officer, keep a contact card from the officer and write the date of the meeting so if any problem comes up in the future you at least have something. Meeting an officer face-to-face may pay off big time in the future.

    Hope this helps
  • YakAddictYakAddict Posts: 55 Greenhorn
    A few suggestions for after you've confirmed it's legal and before you commence shooting:

    1. Clearly mark your property boundaries with No Trespass signs. 

    2. Provide in advance to (at least adjacent) neighbors/property owners of your intentions (preferably in writing for documentation), which may even include day(s) of the week and time(s) of day(s) you anticipate shooting.

    No Trespass signs may be helpful CYA in the event of an unfortunate accidental shooting.
      
    Advance notice is "neighborly" and may help minimize unaware neighbors' calls to Law Enforcement about "shooting in the area".
  • YakAddictYakAddict Posts: 55 Greenhorn
    What is this area's Zoning designation?
  • VertigoVertigo Yankeetown, FLPosts: 617 Officer
    I'm not a lawyer, but here are segments of Florida law below that I think are applicable.  Apparently, as a result of State Preemption, all local regulations, ordinances or rules pertaining to firearms are null and void, with the possible exceptions of contracts like covenants or deed restrictions, so zoning wouldn't make any difference. It also appears that if the residential density is less than one house per acre, target shooting is legal, and if reasonable precautions are taken shooting in higher densities may also be legal.  I'm open to other interpretations, and any lawyer or LEO comments would be sincerely welcomed.
    ------------
    "Any person who recreationally discharges a firearm outdoors, including target shooting, in an area that the person knows or reasonably should know is primarily residential in nature and that has a residential density of one or more dwelling units per acre, commits a misdemeanor of the first degree.
    This subsection does not apply:  (b) If, under the circumstances, the discharge does not pose a reasonably foreseeable risk to life, safety, or property."

    790.33 Field of regulation of firearms and ammunition preempted.—
    (1) PREEMPTION.—Except as expressly provided by the State Constitution or general law, the Legislature hereby declares that it is occupying the whole field of regulation of firearms and ammunition, including the purchase, sale, transfer, taxation, manufacture, ownership, possession, storage, and transportation thereof, to the exclusion of all existing and future county, city, town, or municipal ordinances or any administrative regulations or rules adopted by local or state government relating thereto. Any such existing ordinances, rules, or regulations are hereby declared null and void."
  • pottydocpottydoc Port Saint JoePosts: 4,972 Captain
    YakAddict said:
    Stray projectiles can have ugly unintended consequences.
    2 acres isn't a great deal of space. An acre square is only 209' x 209'. As far as safety is concerned it depends in part on configuration of acreage and type of firearms.
    As far as the law is concerned it would be prudent to contact the Citrus County Sheriffs Office (or whatever the responsible local law enforcement agency) before shooting. Most law enforcement will say ignorance of the law isn't a valid excuse.
    If it be legal (and safe) then be considerate of and courteous to others nearby. I have a neighbor who legally shoots (which I found out after complaining to the Sheriff Dep't.) on most Sundays on and off for 2-4 hours at a time. High-powered and semi-automatic weapons, often after what I consider to be "safe light" (and I am a hunter).  I don't know how he affords the ammo. Sounds like WW III. Makes our horses frantic. And it's annoying.  
     Your neighbor has the same right to shoot on his property as you have to raise horses on yours. I net if someone complained about the smell you wouldn’t give dang, even though that’s annoying to other people.  

    OP, you’re probably legal, I would look up the laws first, I know there’s some restrictions on size of property and you must have a big enough berm, so I’d have those on hand when I talked to
    the law. The officer you talk to might not know them as well as you.
  • surfmansurfman WC FLPosts: 6,008 Admiral
    Bullets can ricochet off wood too.
    Tight Lines, Steve
    My posts are my opinion only.

    Be thankful we're not getting all the government we're paying for.  Will Rogers
  • YakAddictYakAddict Posts: 55 Greenhorn
    pottydoc said:
     I net if someone complained about the smell you wouldn’t give dang, even though that’s annoying to other people.  


    Our land is zoned for Agriculture. Over the years we have had breeding horse stock, sold horses as well as trained horses for farm income. Some of our horses have also been used for beef cattle ranching (also for farm income). I've never had anyone complain about livestock odor, and if I ever should my reply would be...1.) "It smells like money to me" and 2.) "Go file a complaint: and good luck because here in Florida there's a Right to Farm."
  • VertigoVertigo Yankeetown, FLPosts: 617 Officer
    edited November 2018 #13
    Annoying neighbors are almost a fact of life no matter where you live or how your property is zoned.  Gun fire can be particularly annoying.  It's loud, it can be dangerous, and a good portion of the population think guns are evil and anyone who shoots one is a disciple of Satan.  Even if my target shooting is legal, I make every effort to do it at a time when it's most likely to NOT disturb neighbors, and when possible at such a distance and so shielded that neighbors don't know I'm shooting at all.  




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