Wreck Anchoring Etiquette

OK, so this is a question I've had for some time.  Anchoring proximity etiquette varies wildly from location to location and target species.  It's generally totally fine in the rivers of the northwest (the Columbia in particular) to anchor up 50 feet from the next guy when targeting salmon.  It's called a hog line and it's expected, not just tolerated.  But you don't anchor 50 feet in FRONT of the next guy, as that is dumb and dangerous and will get you sworn at.

I've been out to the wrecks numerous times, including Saturday, where I was anchored over some structure bottom bumping and I've got flat lines out, and someone will pull up right next to or behind me, within 100 feet, and horn in.  Now, I'm a pretty tolerant guy, but I'm looking for the group's consensus on acceptable ranges in this area under those conditions.  I had a guy 100-feet off my stern when I had a 100-foot flatline out.  I asked him if my bait was still alive, since it was basically at his boat.  He was like, "What?" and he just carried on.  There was another guy, at the same time who came within 20 feet of my bow before backing up, no "my bad" or anything.  I was a little flabbergasted.  Is that just a tactic some people use to push others off their favorite spot?  My buddy and I had been there about an hour and had a few break offs on the bottom and caught a big barracuda, but I was just so offput by these two boats, we just pulled up and left. 

On the same trip, we were coming into the Vilano inlet, and bonita schools were everywhere, so we started chasing them around.  I was on the other side of a school and casting in to them and this guy goes apoplectic yelling at me to give him some space.  Now, I'm not in reach of him, on the far side of a school, he wasn't anchored, we were both just targeting the nearest school that popped up.  There were schools all over the place, so I moved on, but I wouldn't think twice about someone working the other side of a school I was working, so I was a little shocked at his indignation.  

So, is there a consensus on this?  Should I protect my anchorage on a wreck?  If so, at what radius?  What's acceptable here?  I'm worried about the flatline - someone too close is likely to prevent me hooking up, and if a king does hit, I'm likely to get fouled by the intruder's lines.

On the schools, is there a courteous distance?  I've never seen anyone particularly care about my space, and I don't mind someone working the same school as me.  As long as there's little chance of a fish on taking me into another boats fishing area, I really don't care.  

Thoughts?  

Replies

  • LMKLMK Posts: 584 Officer
    I have to admit that I wonder a lot of the same things. I never try to anchor in the area of another boat and also see places where there are boats right on top of each other, mostly yellow tail areas in the keys. I was told to never anchor close enough to be able to hear voices. Mostly I just go find another place to fish. I try to figure out what I would want and if I were the other guy and try to do that. There is a ton of experience here so I am looking forward to learning what others say on this subject, thanks!!
  • ChonggChongg Posts: 720 Officer
    Can't speak to the wreck anchoring but the school of Bonita doesn't seem like a big deal, as long as you're not spooking the fish.  
  • fsu11fsu11 Posts: 2,064 Captain
    if you think its crazy up here at 9 mile try going to sebastian inlet and fishing for snook, i had to learn quickly you fit your boat in wherever you can and just fish. went down a couple months ago and it was bumper to bumper in the inlet lol
  • magellanmagellan Posts: 52 Greenhorn
    You have inconsiderate SOB’s everywhere. I have been anchored at the jetty’s, about 25’-30’ off the rocks and a boat goes between me and the rocks and grabbed my line with motor. People do JUST what they want to do regardless of anyone else or others around the. It’s just the way people are now, Selfish.
  • sandy1147sandy1147 Posts: 153 Deckhand
    Following this to learn the etiquette. I see many reef trips in my future. Thank you for bringing this up. Personally, I don't think the schooling fishing was wrong. If I was the other guy, I would have been happy to see others catching as well. As far as the anchoring, I think that is way too close. I don't now though so I'm waiting to learn. 
    ___________________________
    2019 Pioneer Islander 180
    "Sandy Blue"
  • jmac7469jmac7469 Posts: 132 Deckhand
    Proper etiquette would be if someone is anchored or drifting a wreck, move on. Sadly that is rarely the case. Most people have no etiquette. Between running a boat as a private captain, and running a commercial boat I've seen more than my fair share of people crowding in on wrecks. The majority of the wrecks aren't big enough to fish 2 boats on at a time. There are a few exceptions like the Anna, Casablanca, and the dry dock. Those you can get 2 boats on no problem. Unfortunately there's always gonna be that guy that has to be where you are weather it's at 9 mile or somewhere on the break.
  • Tony RomaTony Roma Posts: 643 Officer
    ^are your saying if I roll up too 9 mile and somebody is there I should find another spot. Not enough nearshore numbers in the ocean for that. We do our best not to crowd folks but it’s like hunting management area, we all own it.
  • LunaseaLunasea Posts: 136 Deckhand
    this is likely more a case of inexperience and ignorance than being inconsiderate.  When I used to fish offshore, I always felt it was OK to anchor nearby someone, or them nearby me BUT 

    - KNOW HOW TO ANCHOR your boat, how to figure the lay and scope, where to position your anchor to end up in the desired location.  If you don't have those skills, don't attempt it in close proximity... BE SURE you know where the other guy's anchor is before even considering dropping yours... 

    - DO NOT anchor ahead of or behind the guy who is already there (based on the current and "drift"), you will foul his lines and/or anchor line.   

    - Anchor to his SIDE, but not "too close".  If you position properly, 100 feet, or so, is probably fine.  Some may complain, but if you have anchored properly it is THEY who are being inconsiderate.  It is, after all, a public resource. 

     - Pay attention, if the drift begins to change (current or wind change), don't let it place you in the wrong spot relative to the guy who was already there.  

    - Oh, and as you approach the area, go to dead slow idle and get on the hook or get GONE quickly.  Don't stir up the area or make a lot of noise.  


    Down from the soapbox...
  • Snatch-UmSnatch-Um Posts: 1,363 Officer
    You can also simply idle up to the boat and ask if they don't mind if you get beside them..In the end we're all still people. However,  if they refuse...then you can begin doing figure 8's and kindly wave at them :D J/k on the last part...
  • jmac7469jmac7469 Posts: 132 Deckhand
    Tony Roma said:
    ^are your saying if I roll up too 9 mile and somebody is there I should find another spot. Not enough nearshore numbers in the ocean for that. We do our best not to crowd folks but it’s like hunting management area, we all own it.
    You should spend more time fishing. There are literally hundreds of nearshore numbers and wrecks. 
    But, I guess it's just easier to pull up on someone and "share" the spot. 
  • Sea SnakeSea Snake Posts: 5,462 Admiral
    What Tyler said is the correct etiquette.....and also depends on how far off you ran to get there, or how big a wreck is.

    Some wrecks are kinda small to share, others are plenty big enough to share. 

    likewise, if you run 25 or 30 miles to a spot to fish, and someone is there already, idle up near and see if they mind you fishing with them. 

    I did this a few weeks ago, was fishing BR, and decided to go look for a small spot I have fished before, but evidently it has been moved by recent storms, so I moseyed over to CASABLANCA, ....and Paul Gallup's son ( Paul Jr ) was there fishing his Dad's boat with some friends.....he was just drifting the spot.....so I just got to with talking distance and asked if he minded if we fished the edge too.....I watched him do several drifts and he was controlling his boat like a pro....so I felt comfortable dropping my Ipilot.....and we fished a bit....before heading in. All very professional, and courteous ....had he gave me the stink eye.....I'd have just moved on....but it was literally the last stop for me.

    Closer in spots like 9 mile and the PG / PM numbers.....you better be ready to share....because for a vast majority thats the limits of their range...so be nice and make you intentions known.


    And just to let it be known...I'd NEVER TURN FIGURE 8'S around people....It's MUCH BETTER to tilt your motors until just half out of the water ...back up within range and gun it.....you'lll spray em with 50 gallons of water !!!

    .......just sayin'.......
  • PangamanPangaman Posts: 757 Officer
    That's why I try to fish out past 40 miles most of the time. People will still run up on you even when you are out 50 miles. Normally they do a circle around you 50 feet off trying to steal your number. Then they drift next to you in the sand. Not catch anything and then leave. Divers are the worst inshore. They will pull up, dive in the water and swim down right under your boat while you are fishing. I try not to get mad like I used to. Now I leave early from the boat ramp to beat the crowds and fish further offshore.
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 11,385 AG
    Pangaman said:
    That's why I try to fish out past 40 miles most of the time. People will still run up on you even when you are out 50 miles. Normally they do a circle around you 50 feet off trying to steal your number. Then they drift next to you in the sand. Not catch anything and then leave. Divers are the worst inshore. They will pull up, dive in the water and swim down right under your boat while you are fishing. I try not to get mad like I used to. Now I leave early from the boat ramp to beat the crowds and fish further offshore.
    makes you want to break out the depth charges

    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • fsu11fsu11 Posts: 2,064 Captain
    Sea Snake said:
    What Tyler said is the correct etiquette.....and also depends on how far off you ran to get there, or how big a wreck is.

    Some wrecks are kinda small to share, others are plenty big enough to share. 

    likewise, if you run 25 or 30 miles to a spot to fish, and someone is there already, idle up near and see if they mind you fishing with them. 

    I did this a few weeks ago, was fishing BR, and decided to go look for a small spot I have fished before, but evidently it has been moved by recent storms, so I moseyed over to CASABLANCA, ....and Paul Gallup's son ( Paul Jr ) was there fishing his Dad's boat with some friends.....he was just drifting the spot.....so I just got to with talking distance and asked if he minded if we fished the edge too.....I watched him do several drifts and he was controlling his boat like a pro....so I felt comfortable dropping my Ipilot.....and we fished a bit....before heading in. All very professional, and courteous ....had he gave me the stink eye.....I'd have just moved on....but it was literally the last stop for me.

    Closer in spots like 9 mile and the PG / PM numbers.....you better be ready to share....because for a vast majority thats the limits of their range...so be nice and make you intentions known.


    And just to let it be known...I'd NEVER TURN FIGURE 8'S around people....It's MUCH BETTER to tilt your motors until just half out of the water ...back up within range and gun it.....you'lll spray em with 50 gallons of water !!!

    .......just sayin'.......
    paul jr doesnt catch any fish anyways so he was probably happy to have you mosey on next to him so he could learn a thing or too, just kidding paul is respectful and you both showed a good example of how people should act.
  • dontezumadontezuma Posts: 199 Deckhand
    Thanks, guys. Great discussion. 
  • Snatch-UmSnatch-Um Posts: 1,363 Officer
    If the spot is natural bottom, not on a public chart...then really most of this stuff we just talked about goes out the window!!  If you happen to have a spot like this and someone is already there..you can try the "hi and wave" thing but you'll probably get ignored.  People are a lot more protective of spots like these.  If you see a boat in the distance and are looking to "chicken-hawk" a new spot from someone 40 miles out...be prepared to get yelled at.  Most people I know will drag anchor and leave if someone is heading their way on a spot that's special to them...It's just the way it is...it takes time, money, and a good network to acquire awesome offshore numbers, (or you can steal them like some do) either way they are precious to fishermen.  Again...theses "rules and opinions" being expressed are mostly for bottom fishing only.  If you stop a mile short and slow troll around and keep your distance, a confrontation is very unlikely.
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 11,385 AG
    @Snatch-Um
     LOL that's what those $5,000 radar systems are for 
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • dc1dc1 Posts: 10 Greenhorn
    Another good tactic is just have one of your crew drop their drawers, grab their ankles and spread that hairy **** as far as they can - and hold it!
  • andrewthe1andrewthe1 Posts: 801 Officer
    Snatch-Um said:
    If the spot is natural bottom, not on a public chart...then really most of this stuff we just talked about goes out the window!!  If you happen to have a spot like this and someone is already there..you can try the "hi and wave" thing but you'll probably get ignored.  People are a lot more protective of spots like these.  If you see a boat in the distance and are looking to "chicken-hawk" a new spot from someone 40 miles out...be prepared to get yelled at.  Most people I know will drag anchor and leave if someone is heading their way on a spot that's special to them...It's just the way it is...it takes time, money, and a good network to acquire awesome offshore numbers, (or you can steal them like some do) either way they are precious to fishermen.  Again...theses "rules and opinions" being expressed are mostly for bottom fishing only.  If you stop a mile short and slow troll around and keep your distance, a confrontation is very unlikely.
    I laugh when my friends think they got a "secret set of numbers" from an "old legend commercial/charter guy"......I think everyone in jax has that set LOL
    we need more internet money
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