FWC bush hogging acres of gall berries?

relicshunterrelicshunter Posts: 514 Officer
I just can't wrap my head around why FWC would bush hog acres and acres of gall berries in a WMA. I am having a bad few years at one of the coastal WMA's. I've had a scheduled fire get out of hand and burn one of my favorite spots, tidal flooding salt over a good pig spot, another burn wiped out a back up spot and now they have bush hogged acres of nice gall berries and shrub oaks. What the heck is going on? Gall berry is a great food source, why would they do that? 

Replies

  • binellishtrbinellishtr Posts: 7,666 Admiral
    its what the public wanted I guess?
  • tagtag Posts: 8,742 Admiral

     fire control, maybe?

    Either that or they're trying to chase hunters away.

  • H20dadH20dad Posts: 853 Officer
    Texas mountain lions don’t like gall berries and since they are a prime source of food for bees European honey bees are hated by the Fwc. 
  • DayzGonByeDayzGonBye Posts: 80 Greenhorn
    Why don't you ask them why?  They'll tell you.  Personally I think once the gall berries get a lot of woody growth they're not great browse.  The berry itself is mostly eaten by birds and the the leaves get less palatable as they get old.  As a general rule of thumb younger fresher growth is better deer browse so you'll probably be better off in a season or two.
  • Florida BullfrogFlorida Bullfrog Posts: 1,551 Captain
    In the Osceola deer prefer galberries to acorns and they are providing food well into late winter. 
  • Walker DogWalker Dog Posts: 1,723 Captain
    It's what the habitat needed I guess

    Like was suggested, ask them and they will probably be more than happy to tell you why they are doing it.
  • binellishtrbinellishtr Posts: 7,666 Admiral
    it sort of like the spray program, use it or loose it..but id like to hear why when plenty of other areas could use habitat management for exotics
  • Walker DogWalker Dog Posts: 1,723 Captain
    So they should.focus exclusively on managing exotics and ignore the native vegetation. Brilliant! Wonder why nobody else thought of that before!
  • Turner River TerrorTurner River Terror Posts: 5,375 Admiral
    Them mowed Gall berry's will be a natural Food Plot for 5 years....
    Try hunting a Pine Forest Lease. Your Hot Spot can be changed in 2 days for Miles.
    Got to roll with the punches and keep current on your animals.
    I'd set up a Ladder Stand staring at the closest Thick spot to them Gall Berrys.
    Killin and Grillin :grin
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 619 Officer
    edited June 8 #11
    Them mowed Gall berry's will be a natural Food Plot for 5 years....

    I'd set up a Ladder Stand staring at the closest Thick spot to them Gall Berrys.
    @relicshunter
    Which wma did you say this was?

    lol
  • binellishtrbinellishtr Posts: 7,666 Admiral
    So they should.focus exclusively on managing exotics and ignore the native vegetation. Brilliant! Wonder why nobody else thought of that before!
    Where did I say exclusively?
  • relicshunterrelicshunter Posts: 514 Officer
    It was a beautiful spot with trails all through it between a small water hole and sand live oaks. I've found does like to bed in the gall berries. I will be asking them also, I just can't think of a good idea to do that. 
  • spanglerspangler daBurgPosts: 619 Officer
    edited June 8 #14
    it sort of like the spray program, use it or loose it..
    So much truth to this statement.  Worse yet, they do everything they can to spend the whole budget, necessary or not, so that next year they get MORE.  Literally how it works.  Saw it all the time.  Heard it straight from the horse's mouth more than once.

    Of course they will never tell you that.  But if they give you a reason that doesn't make good sense.  You can figure it was to keep the money flowing!
  • waterdipperwaterdipper Posts: 47 Greenhorn
     I like it when they roller chop/ bushhog areas I hunt. Burned areas are even better. It is the way to make food plots out of native habitat. If the deer were in the area before, they will be again. That new growth will be great to hunt over for several years. You might have to alter the way you hunt the area, but I am willing to bet it will enhance the habitat versus hurt it. Also, I would go into the area you were going to hunt and hand spread some fertilizer over the gallberries. This is how I create natural food plots on my property and the deer definitely know the difference between fertilized and non-fertilized vegetation. When you talk to them you should thank FWC or Forestry for doing this habitat management as they are enhancing the habitat for wildlife.
  • bgeorgebgeorge Plant City FLPosts: 1,371 Officer

    Some of the chopping funds come from people like NWTF to improve habitat for turkeys and such.  They can mow and chop all they want but it will grow back.  They younger growth will be better in short time than the old growth.  You have to look at it in a much bigger picture than just your spots.  What percentage of habitat has been chopped or burned? 

    You may want to take in a climber and watch.  You may find that you will learn more about the movements that can be capitalized on in short time. 

    The man who moves a mountain begins by carrying away small stones. Hopefully the next man is not dropping his stones on the mountain you are trying to move.
  • relicshunterrelicshunter Posts: 514 Officer
    I know they haven't killed the gall berry but it's not going to be great this year. Also many other hunters will see the inner details of the nice area now. It is easier to get into, and easier to see my set up stand when I get it installed. Hope they are not planning to burn also. 
  • Walker DogWalker Dog Posts: 1,723 Captain
    edited June 8 #18
    Where did I say exclusively?
    You didn't say it. If i interpreted what you said correctly, you implied it when you said that if there are areas where exotics need to be managed then you'd like to hear an explaination of why they are managing native vegetation. Maybe that's not what you meant?

  • bswivbswiv Posts: 6,918 Admiral
    I know they haven't killed the gall berry but it's not going to be great this year. Also many other hunters will see the inner details of the nice area now. It is easier to get into, and easier to see my set up stand when I get it installed. Hope they are not planning to burn also. 
    The ensuing burn, if it is accomplished, would generally be a positive. A mosaic of ground cover with a bit of gallberry surrounded by grasses, forbs, legumes and the like is far more valuable for wildlife than a mono-culture of gallberry. 

    This is a good place to start learning about the woods that are so necessary to the animals we hunt.

    https://www.freshfromflorida.com/Divisions-Offices/Florida-Forest-Service/Wildland-Fire/Prescribed-Fire



  • Turner River TerrorTurner River Terror Posts: 5,375 Admiral
    Well Said...
    Killin and Grillin :grin
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