Vidalia Onions

I've been planting vidalia onion plants I get from Gramlings.
It has nothing to do with them.
 They are good people. They deal with someone who brings them
plants to sell. Nothing to do with him. Last year and this year, some of the plants 
would double, triple and quadruple.
Anyone have any ideas? Woods?

Replies

  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Posts: 1,867 Captain
    Tell me what you mean by double/triple/quadruple? You mean the bulb will divide into more than one bulb?
  • plumbbobplumbbob Posts: 781 Officer
    Yes! Last years plants were the best and this past years weren't.
    But, both sets of plants multiplied.
    And, by the away, Your grits are killer!!!
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Posts: 1,867 Captain

    Vidalias are a cross of two onions native to the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. One is the Texas 1015, and I forget the name of the other variety. If you plant single plants there should be no multiple bulbs. I've got about 12,000 of 'em stuck in the dirt right now that will be ready late next month, and the only double bulbs that I'll have are those that were accidently planted as double plants. My plants come from a large plant supplier in Texas that supplies onion plants to really big growers all across the South. Gramlings, I think, gets their plants from Bonnie which produces a number of different plant seedlings. Bonnies produces excellent plants, so I can't figure out why yours should be dividing unless you are accidently planting more than one in the same drill.

    Glad you like the grits! Try the "smoked grits" and see how you like these too!

  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 22,949 AG
    I thought to be called Vidalia they had to be from a special place in GA?
    133cbf2b243368b1ddb2f591a1988076--beach-posters-florida-travel.jpg
  • ferris1248ferris1248 Posts: 1,888 Moderator
    They do.
    "That which is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow. That is the whole of the law. The rest is commentary."

    Rabbi Hillel (c20 BCE)
  • dewyafishdewyafish Posts: 4,956 Captain
    Central Georgia farmers got smart and trademarked the name.
    The onions are the same but the soil makes the difference.
    There was a group of growers not long ago in the Tifton area that were trying to trademark the Ty Ty Sweet.
    There's nothing more enjoyable than suprise morning sex...
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    .
    Unless you happen to be in jail at the time.
  • SloughSlough S.w. Ga./ St. JamesPosts: 4,494 Captain
    edited April 25 #8
    All certified Vidalia onions are sample tested by a certified USDA lab before they can be sold as Vidalia. Lab in Camilla did it for a couple years. Got all I wanted from a friend there. Nothing wrong with them except they all had a hole in them where the core sample was taken. Done forgot what the sample  percentage was.
    I didn't say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 22,949 AG
    edited April 25 #9
    Sweet onions are the best. Kinda like the purple too. They grow OK most years in northcentral Fl.
    133cbf2b243368b1ddb2f591a1988076--beach-posters-florida-travel.jpg
  • AnchorbaitAnchorbait CrawfordvillePosts: 64 Greenhorn
    Vidalia onions must have been grown within soil that must meet certain criteria. Most of this soil is within the city limits of Vidalia Georgia, with some exceptions outside the city limits.
    You to can also grow "Vidalia" onions in your own yard, just get a soil test to prove the proper soil requirments to label your product. Its just not an easy label to qulify for.
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Posts: 1,867 Captain

    Let me break some bad news to you!

    The source of my information is a very large onion plant supplier in Texas who supplies onion sets to growers all over the USA, Central and South America, including to the farmer who grows Texas 1015's on my wife's farm in the Lower Rio Grande Valley in Texas:

    The Vidalia name is owned by a small group of corporate farmers in the area of Vidalia, Georgia. Originally the onions had to be grown in about a 3 county area around Vidalia. Then it was expanded to cover 12-15 counties just a few years ago as the Market caught on to "Vidalias". Then the owners of the Vidalia trade name extended it-------again------ to include Chile, Peru, Columbia, Mexico, Texas, wherever onions can be grown throughout the year to supply the US and foreign markets 12 months out of the year with "Vidalia" onions! Next January or February when you are in Publix or any supermarket, and look at the "fresh Vidalias" in the produce section, quietly tell yourself how glad you are that the growers can grow Vidalias in the Vidalia area 12 months out of the year even though onions, unlike most vegetables, take several months to grow and produce! (I planted my "Talladalias" in Nov-Dec, and they'll be ready late next month!)

    ("Talladalias" is MY registered trademark name and is to be used only on onions that I grow in Leon County, Florida and nowhere else!)

  • MGTeacherMGTeacher South GaPosts: 1,632 Captain
    Vidalia onions must have been grown within soil that must meet certain criteria. Most of this soil is within the city limits of Vidalia Georgia, with some exceptions outside the city limits.
    You to can also grow "Vidalia" onions in your own yard, just get a soil test to prove the proper soil requirments to label your product. Its just not an easy label to qulify for.
    Tattnall Co. is the largest grower of Vidalia onions.
    My Favorite Smile Is Vertical
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 8,774 Admiral
    So many Cactus Blossoms/Onion Blossoms/Bloomin Onions at all these chain restaurants.   They were working on an x ray machine when i left the industry to pick out the single hearted ones because the ones with two or more would fall apart.   
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 22,949 AG
    I thought the blooming onion fad faded along with that steakhouses reputation....can't even remember it's name. Nasty salty food...
    133cbf2b243368b1ddb2f591a1988076--beach-posters-florida-travel.jpg
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 8,774 Admiral
    They were ungodly disgusting after the first week.   But most places still sell them.   Outback, Chilis, Texas Roadhouse.    I just don't got to any of those places.   $8-9 or a fried onion with some horseradish mayo in the middle???  LOL no thanks.   
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
  • trout069trout069 Posts: 4,368 Captain
    MGTeacher said:
    Vidalia onions must have been grown within soil that must meet certain criteria. Most of this soil is within the city limits of Vidalia Georgia, with some exceptions outside the city limits.
    You to can also grow "Vidalia" onions in your own yard, just get a soil test to prove the proper soil requirments to label your product. Its just not an easy label to qulify for.
    Tattnall Co. is the largest grower of Vidalia onions.
    Yep and still not sure if any of mom's family makes anything off them. Now running fiber optic cable, yes they do. 
  • stc1993stc1993 Albany, GA Carrabelle, FLPosts: 4,549 Captain

    Allium cepa "White Granex"  I think this is the ones most plant for Vidalias,  Maui, Hawaii too.


  • plumbbobplumbbob Posts: 781 Officer
    The sets Gramling gets are supposedly from onion farms in and around Vidalia.
    They do sell Bonnie onions which I think they call Granex.
    Still, I'm wondering why onion sets have multiplied???
    I divide and replant which makes the plane have to root again,
    which takes time.
    Could it be my planting medium?
  • woodsrunnerwoodsrunner Posts: 1,867 Captain

    Here is what I know of the Vidalia Onion, and while I think it is basically correct I can't cite sources of my info. Its simply knowledge that I've picked up over the years but it all seems to fall in place with new information that I pick up:

    A family farm in the Vidalia area started growing really sweet onions back in the 1930's. The soil, lacking in some elements and being higher than normal in others, produced a very sweet onion. I think it was tied to a lack of sulfur and an over-abundance of iodine. This high iodine rate is also tied to Georgia peaches being superior if I remember my soil science classes correctly. Anyhow----

    During WWII two brothers from the family farm in Vidalia enlisted in the US Army Air Corps and were jointly sent to the Lower Rio Grande Valley in Texas for flight training. That's all BIG FARM COUNTRY, irrigated by the Rio Grande River, and my wife's farm is only 15-20 miles from where the brothers training took place. Anyhow, the brothers liked the area so much that they returned after the War and bought a large farm. One stayed there and farmed, and the other returned to the family farm in Vidalia. They grew sweet onions at both places--Georgia and Texas--and genetically crossed what they were growing at each place. Thus the emergence of the sweet Vidalia Onion, and that may be the Allium cepa "White Granix' mentioned above.  

  • AnchorbaitAnchorbait CrawfordvillePosts: 64 Greenhorn
    edited April 25 #20

    Let me break some bad news to you!

    The source of my information is a very large onion plant supplier in Texas who supplies onion sets to growers all over the USA, Central and South America, including to the farmer who grows Texas 1015's on my wife's farm in the Lower Rio Grande Valley in Texas:

    The Vidalia name is owned by a small group of corporate farmers in the area of Vidalia, Georgia. Originally the onions had to be grown in about a 3 county area around Vidalia. Then it was expanded to cover 12-15 counties just a few years ago as the Market caught on to "Vidalias". Then the owners of the Vidalia trade name extended it-------again------ to include Chile, Peru, Columbia, Mexico, Texas, wherever onions can be grown throughout the year to supply the US and foreign markets 12 months out of the year with "Vidalia" onions! Next January or February when you are in Publix or any supermarket, and look at the "fresh Vidalias" in the produce section, quietly tell yourself how glad you are that the growers can grow Vidalias in the Vidalia area 12 months out of the year even though onions, unlike most vegetables, take several months to grow and produce! (I planted my "Talladalias" in Nov-Dec, and they'll be ready late next month!)

    ("Talladalias" is MY registered trademark name and is to be used only on onions that I grow in Leon County, Florida and nowhere else!)

    Not sure this is bad news, but thanks for the insight.
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