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BEST WAY TO STORE NEW ORVIS FLY ROD?

snapperwhippersnapperwhipper Posts: 131 Deckhand
Been fishing all my life but never tried fly fishing so for my 30th anniversary me and my wife took fly casting lessons (I'm a lucky guy) and bought a nice rod/reel combo. So we are in the practice mode a lot, now my question, I don't want to take it apart every time so should I store it vertical or should I store it horizontal all put together so I can just grab it and practice. In the fly shops they seem to be stored vertical and of course when I'm not using it I will take it apart and keep it in it's sock and tube. So far the only thing I have caught is the CAT on practice fly with no hooks of course. FUN. Thanks in advance Mike.
When all else fails...jiggle that wire:\

Replies

  • TgrassTgrass Posts: 204 Deckhand
    I know you don't want to take it apart but if you don't when the day comes that you want to an you can't, don't be surprised.

    If you don't want to break it down, then you should at a minimum separate the sections and then re-seat them.
  • Ol'DirtyCasterOl'DirtyCaster Posts: 2,422 Captain
    Tgrass wrote: »
    I know you don't want to take it apart but if you don't when the day comes that you want to an you can't, don't be surprised.

    If you don't want to break it down, then you should at a minimum separate the sections and then re-seat them.

    Or.....
  • Permit RatPermit Rat Posts: 2,283 Captain
    I am assuming your Orvis is a graphite rod (they still make the bamboo rods and rod storage is much more critical for them) so for short term storage with the reel attached, it's your choice. Personally, I opt for horizontal long term storage with the reel attached. I have a wall large enough such that I can put 5 rods on the wall at one time and each rod has 3 points of contact for near perfect straight line support for the blank.

    Bamboo is a different story. Bamboo rods will take a set during long time storage and I even had my Orvis bamboo rod tip take a set, while stored dis-jointed in the tube for a long period. The set eventually disappeared when I started using the rod again but after that, I was very careful to place the rod tube in as near vertical position as possible. I also put the butt section in the sock, butt first and the tip sections with the tip-tops UP. This seemed to work and I never had a problem after that.
    .......Rick
  • snapperwhippersnapperwhipper Posts: 131 Deckhand
    To all that responded THANKS for the information. I will order a can of ferrule wax which will be good for my fly rod and my travel rods as well. Most of my spin rods are 1 piece but a couple aren't and Tgrass is right they don't want to come apart if the stay together to long, that's not going to happen with my new fly rod. Now speaking of bamboo, I have had this bamboo rod that an old friend gave me that they found in the attic of grandmas house which has been stored properly in the original container and hasn't seen the light of day for at least 30 years or more. It is in really good shape, and is a 3 piece rod with 2 tips, one tip is a little shorter ( maybe it was broken) and the reel seat is nickel or some type and the cork is good as well. It has no markings on it any ware of any kind. I was going to make it a wall hanger but not sure now. It's pretty whippy and would be good for fresh water bream or something like that, I guess I should take it to a fly shop and have it evaluated.
    When all else fails...jiggle that wire:\
  • Permit RatPermit Rat Posts: 2,283 Captain
    If your bamboo rod has no markings on it whatsoever, then chances are it was refinished by a previous owner. This was a very popular hobby, back in the 1800s and into the 1900s, until fiberglass was developed for fishing rods. My maternal grandfather was one such devotee of rod refinishing and he had a small business on the side. As is often the case, there were times when people never came in to pick up and/or pay for the finished product. So my grandfather would add his name to the rod and make it his own. Unfortunately, one such rod was a Paul Young 8' dry fly special.....a rod that in its original condition, would fetch a price in the neighborhood of $2500 at one time. But having been refinished, it was worth about a third that much.

    Your rod may have been made by Montague or Heddon.....they made a lot of those rods in the late 19th - early 20th century and sold for as little as $4.00. The fancy ones came in a velvet lined wooden form into which all the sections nested and were very well protected. The stripping guide and the tip top were agate-rimmed guides. (yes, real agate stone). I had one of those Montagues and my paternal grandfather had a Heddon, but a low end model, with just a canvas sock and no agate guides. It was the first rod I ever used and he, like many common folk of the era, used a bait casting reel on it, instead of a fly reel.
    .......Rick
  • Permit RatPermit Rat Posts: 2,283 Captain
    OP.....I almost forgot.....you never said if your new Orvis was a bamboo or graphite. If it's bamboo with metal ferrules, go ahead and use the ferrule wax. (Although I just take the male end and rub it along the side of my nose....there is a lot of oil there and this will lubricate a metal ferrule very well)

    At the same time I would caution you about using any kind of wax on a graphite ferrule....especially on today's ultra light blanks that are very thin-walled to begin with. The wax will lubricate, yes....but dirt and sand will also adhere to the wax and then could possibly score your blank when you joint the rod. Just something to think about. Personally, I have never had a problem disjointing my rods, after prolonged storage and my 2 piece rods all became 1 piece, immediately upon delivery, because I jointed them and they stayed jointed, sometimes throughout their entire useful life span. This was a common practice among Keys guides and for that very same reason.
    .......Rick
  • Ol'DirtyCasterOl'DirtyCaster Posts: 2,422 Captain
    Permit Rat wrote: »
    OP.....I almost forgot.....you never said if your new Orvis was a bamboo or graphite. If it's bamboo with metal ferrules, go ahead and use the ferrule wax. (Although I just take the male end and rub it along the side of my nose....there is a lot of oil there and this will lubricate a metal ferrule very well)

    At the same time I would caution you about using any kind of wax on a graphite ferrule....especially on today's ultra light blanks that are very thin-walled to begin with. The wax will lubricate, yes....but dirt and sand will also adhere to the wax and then could possibly score your blank when you joint the rod. Just something to think about. Personally, I have never had a problem disjointing my rods, after prolonged storage and my 2 piece rods all became 1 piece, immediately upon delivery, because I jointed them and they stayed jointed, sometimes throughout their entire useful life span. This was a common practice among Keys guides and for that very same reason.

    Lol! And there you have it folks. Maybe Rick would be kind enough to sell us some of his magic nose oil? Any wax, oil, or lubricant of any kind will collect dirt when exposed, when used in excess. That little container of ferrule lube is enough for about 6 lifetimes. Wax on, wax off, like Daniel san.
  • snapperwhippersnapperwhipper Posts: 131 Deckhand
    OK just to clear up the new fly rod is graphite, it's a RECON 909-4 not the very best but close and the reel is a match to the rod. I have been practicing and I'm getting better but not ready the use this thing in front of other fishermen. I went trout fishing today in Biscayne bay and fished 4 hours and only caught jack, sand perch, and barracuda. When the trout are around I will break it out and try it when I know fish are around. Maybe nose oil would be the best!
    When all else fails...jiggle that wire:\
  • saltybumsaltybum Posts: 1,660 Captain
    I use a leftover bar of surfboard wax from my younger days for my rods. Works like a charm.
  • Tight LoopsTight Loops Posts: 206 Deckhand
    I would not be worried about keeping your rod together. It is really rare to have one get stuck and if it does two guys working together can get it apart. I have 18 fly rods in our school that can go years without getting taken down and all my personal fishing rods stay strung up year round. If you store it horizontal make sure it has support like Permit Rat said. I store mine vertical in a rack. Don't store it vertical by leaning it up in a corner...at least not for long.
  • HeartNShoalHeartNShoal Posts: 937 Officer
    84db4b3388e30866299b16425da78338.jpg

    $3.00 at your local Walmart or grocery store.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  • Tight LoopsTight Loops Posts: 206 Deckhand
    Older fly rod ferrules had a tendency to stick together and/or work loose while casting and a wax or paraffin would help them "stick" together without getting totally stuck. Modern ferrules have better tolerances and many are made extra long so as they wear there is more length to to push together. IMHO I don't think wax is necessary any more and just collects grit that wears the ferrules out faster.
  • HeartNShoalHeartNShoal Posts: 937 Officer
    I put a very light coating of wax. Sage recommends it. Mine are so lightly covered the grit doesn't seem to be a factor. Time will tell.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  • mnigromnigro Posts: 73 Deckhand
    OP, unless you're storing that rod outside the rod tube for months and not touching it, you're thinking too much about this. If you are actually taking it out for practice sessions a few times/once a week, just set it in a corner where it won't get accidentally damaged. When you want to run out to practice, get out there and string it up. Maybe pop the top and bottoms sections apart every couple of uses just for piece of mind. When headed out to fishing grounds, break it down and use the travel tube for storage during transportation. Car doors, clumsy feet and fat **** break far more rods than fish do.

    Also, pay no attention to what other people think about your skills. If you're good enough to keep the fly from sticking you in the back of your head while casting, you're ready to fish. Practice by fishing👍

    PS - if you do get a stuck ferrule, build up a "knob" with duct tape on either side to obtain a purchase on the blank and pull it apart that way. I've seen a guide or two sheared off by impatient people when their hands slipped down the blank trying to pry a rod apart.
  • Permit RatPermit Rat Posts: 2,283 Captain
    mnigro wrote: »
    OP, unless you're storing that rod outside the rod tube for months and not touching it, you're thinking too much about this. If you are actually taking it out for practice sessions a few times/once a week, just set it in a corner where it won't get accidentally damaged. When you want to run out to practice, get out there and string it up. Maybe pop the top and bottoms sections apart every couple of uses just for piece of mind. When headed out to fishing grounds, break it down and use the travel tube for storage during transportation. Car doors, clumsy feet and fat **** break far more rods than fish do.


    I agree with this.....Just be sure that your leader is adequately stored....either by winding everything onto the reel (best scenario) or if you leave the rod strung up, that you use a rubber band or twist tie, to make sure the leader cant ever get loose on your floor. It will be invisible and when wifey comes along with the vacuum cleaner, there is no way it can be sucked up, dragging the rod tip with it. Ask me how I know this. You can't react fast enough if your machine has one of those motorized sweeper heads on it...and it starts rolling up your leader in the brush.....trust me.
    .......Rick
  • Tight LoopsTight Loops Posts: 206 Deckhand
    Ouch, a rod tip up the vacuum? That 9 footer became an 8'6" quickly.

    Another way to get "purchase" on a stuck rod besides the duct tape is kitchen rubber gloves. My wife uses them to wash dishes and they work great to get a good grip on rod sections to pull them apart.
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