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Charging Trolling Motor Batteries without dedicated power source

captraycaptray Posts: 52 Greenhorn
All,

I'm still a few months away from my Moccasin 210 being completed and I'm in the unfortunate situation of finding quality indoor storage for it since I don't have room where I live.

I've located a few storage units at a decent price, but none of them provide electricity other than lighting (except for the $440 a month place that is way overpriced). They also don't have a single outlet anywhere on the properties that I can use, so that's out of the question.

Are there any recommended portable charging solutions for the onboard charger?

Obviously gas generators are out of the question since it's a confined space.

I'm hoping to find something I can charge/load up at home and then plug into the onboard charger the night before I plan on fishing to get a full charge. I also want to make sure that I'm getting the right charge and I'm not damaging the onboard charger with lesser equipment.

If anyone has any ideas or has had similar experiences, please let me know.

Thanks!

Replies

  • Saltwater JunkieSaltwater Junkie Posts: 1,086 Officer
    captray wrote: »
    All,

    I'm still a few months away from my Moccasin 210 being completed and I'm in the unfortunate situation of finding quality indoor storage for it since I don't have room where I live.

    I've located a few storage units at a decent price, but none of them provide electricity other than lighting (except for the $440 a month place that is way overpriced). They also don't have a single outlet anywhere on the properties that I can use, so that's out of the question.

    Are there any recommended portable charging solutions for the onboard charger?

    Obviously gas generators are out of the question since it's a confined space.

    I'm hoping to find something I can charge/load up at home and then plug into the onboard charger the night before I plan on fishing to get a full charge. I also want to make sure that I'm getting the right charge and I'm not damaging the onboard charger with lesser equipment.

    If anyone has any ideas or has had similar experiences, please let me know.

    Thanks!

    Sounds like wing nuts will be your friend; get a few lock washers too...:grin When you get home from fishing, you'll probably wash your boat then take it to the storage unit. Before you leave your house to park the boat in the storage unit. Remove the three batteries and charge them. Next time you're going to go get your boat take them with you.

    Been there and delt with all those issues that complicate a days fishing trip. Can honestly tell you that when we were looking to buy a house. I would not look at anything that I couldn't park the boat in the yard or garage. Congrats on the new boat, good luck.
  • ckfrankckfrank Posts: 62 Greenhorn
    If a bare overhead light, buy one of those things that screw in the socket, have an outlet in it and then the bulb screws into it.
  • captraycaptray Posts: 52 Greenhorn
    ckfrank wrote: »
    If a bare overhead light, buy one of those things that screw in the socket, have an outlet in it and then the bulb screws into it.

    Ha, the guy at the storage unit said no go on those. I'll see if I can't make that happen.

    Pete,

    Yeah, I've considered the battery removal option as a worst case scenario...

    If I can't find anything to store enough power to run the onboard charger properly, that'll probably be my route.

    Thanks for the feedback.
  • captraycaptray Posts: 52 Greenhorn
    captray wrote: »
    Ha, the guy at the storage unit said no go on those. I'll see if I can't make that happen.

    Pete,

    Yeah, I've considered the battery removal option as a worst case scenario...

    If I can't find anything to store enough power to run the onboard charger properly, that'll probably be my route.

    Thanks for the feedback.

    Actually found a storage unit with outlets.

    Thanks again for the advice.
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 4,424 Captain
    For anyone else in a similar bind --- there's one easy solution. Simply remove your rig from storage two days before any trip, bring it home and charge it up properly before your trip. Yes, you'll have it un-secured at your house for the two days (and that's a consideration in some places) but you'll be able to ensure proper charging before hitting the road with your rig....
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • captraycaptray Posts: 52 Greenhorn
    Also, in my search for a solution, I came across this

    Would be interested to see how well that works or if it would work properly. I didn't dig into the details, but I'm assuming it has inverters built in for 12 to 120, etc.
  • Vinny lVinny l Posts: 382 Deckhand
    lemaymiami wrote: »
    For anyone else in a similar bind --- there's one easy solution. Simply remove your rig from storage two days before any trip, bring it home and charge it up properly before your trip. Yes, you'll have it un-secured at your house for the two days (and that's a consideration in some places) but you'll be able to ensure proper charging before hitting the road with your rig....

    That's a great idea except Palm Aire condos, where my wife and have a place prohibit trailers boats etc.. on the premises. Hell it was only a few years ago they lifted the prohibition on pickup trucks. Place is nice but has some commy oriented ideas.
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 4,424 Captain
    Condo associations are a pain.... and provide too much work for lawyers, entirely
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • Vinny lVinny l Posts: 382 Deckhand
    I'd sell it in a heart beat if I could find a similar place with a garage for my boat.
  • 91tiger91tiger Posts: 555 Officer
    Vinny, when you are talking about an on board charger, are you talking about a Stealth, that charges your trolling motor batteries while running the boat engine? Or are you talking about a typical on board charger that only charges when you plug it in to A/C power? With the Stealth, you could just do a long run with the boat at the end of your trip to put some juice into your trolling motor batteries. You would still need to plug in from time to time to top up the batteries but with the Stealth I have fished for a week straight running my trolling batteries hard each day and never plugged in while camping in the glades. Stealth also has an option where you can plug your boat into your tow vehicle and continue to charge while you are going down the road.

    Another option could be solar charging if you could mount a panel out side your storage building up high where no one would mess with it. Call Danny at Stealth and see what he recommends. Lithium batteries would be another option because they are so much lighter. Much easier to remove to charge. And they charge back quicker when combined with the Stealth. I have them on my boat and am impressed so far. Still evaluating whether the system has the reserve capacity I need for tarpon fishing in passes in super heavy current. I may be adding an extra 36 volt lithium to my battery bank just as insurance but I went the first 3 months of fishing my boat only charging the trolling motor batteries while running the boat...never had to plug in, and I live on my trolling motor. I fished all day today on the trolling motor 80% of the day and my trolling bank was at 42.1 volts when I put the boat on the trailer.
  • Vinny lVinny l Posts: 382 Deckhand
    91tiger wrote: »
    Vinny, when you are talking about an on board charger, are you talking about a Stealth, that charges your trolling motor batteries while running the boat engine? Or are you talking about a typical on board charger that only charges when you plug it in to A/C power? With the Stealth, you could just do a long run with the boat at the end of your trip to put some juice into your trolling motor batteries. You would still need to plug in from time to time to top up the batteries but with the Stealth I have fished for a week straight running my trolling batteries hard each day and never plugged in while camping in the glades. Stealth also has an option where you can plug your boat into your tow vehicle and continue to charge while you are going down the road.

    Another option could be solar charging if you could mount a panel out side your storage building up high where no one would mess with it. Call Danny at Stealth and see what he recommends. Lithium batteries would be another option because they are so much lighter. Much easier to remove to charge. And they charge back quicker when combined with the Stealth. I have them on my boat and am impressed so far. Still evaluating whether the system has the reserve capacity I need for tarpon fishing in passes in super heavy current. I may be adding an extra 36 volt lithium to my battery bank just as insurance but I went the first 3 months of fishing my boat only charging the trolling motor batteries while running the boat...never had to plug in, and I live on my trolling motor. I fished all day today on the trolling motor 80% of the day and my trolling bank was at 42.1 volts when I put the boat on the trailer.

    Thanks for the info. I wasn't aware of the charging capabilities of the Stealth charger which is going on the boat as per Franks recommendation. Knowing this, I can probably have the Marina chargem up at the beginning of each vacation week. They charge $25 for 8 hours on a work-rack to charge the batteries. I'll call Danny at Stealth then check with the marina on the solar panel idea. I thought about the Lithiums, I just can't get my self to pull that trigger YET.
    Thanks again.

    Tell me, when you guys fish in heavy current for tarpon, why not just drop the hook and have a quick release set up on your anchor line or is there a particular reason you need to remain mobile via a trolling motor? Maybe you can PM me so I don't throw this thread off topic.
  • 91tiger91tiger Posts: 555 Officer
    You absolutely can drop the anchor for tarpon. Around the Keys bridges, that's exactly what I do, with a quick release as you mentioned. But these modern spot lock anchor functions on the trolling motor have made me very lazy. I much prefer to hit the anchor button over dropping and pulling an anchor. It gives me the flexibility to make small position changes quickly. There are a couple of major passes in the Everglades where the current rages through and anchoring is the smartest move but I like to be able to reposition as the fish move. Those spots require your trolling motor to run at close to top speed to hold anchor position and will eat your batteries fast. Amazingly, it doesn't seem to bother the fish at all we have strikes on our lures right next to the boat all the time with the trolling motor going all out trying ot hold us.

    What tarpon won't tolerate is you slowly pushing into a the current with the trolling motor, I think it seems like a massive predator like a dolphin or shark heading up stream. Holding in one spot or going with the current, the trolling motor doesn't spook them at all most of the time.
  • Vinny lVinny l Posts: 382 Deckhand
    91tiger wrote: »
    You absolutely can drop the anchor for tarpon. Around the Keys bridges, that's exactly what I do, with a quick release as you mentioned. But these modern spot lock anchor functions on the trolling motor have made me very lazy. I much prefer to hit the anchor button over dropping and pulling an anchor. It gives me the flexibility to make small position changes quickly. There are a couple of major passes in the Everglades where the current rages through and anchoring is the smartest move but I like to be able to reposition as the fish move. Those spots require your trolling motor to run at close to top speed to hold anchor position and will eat your batteries fast. Amazingly, it doesn't seem to bother the fish at all we have strikes on our lures right next to the boat all the time with the trolling motor going all out trying ot hold us.

    What tarpon won't tolerate is you slowly pushing into a the current with the trolling motor, I think it seems like a massive predator like a dolphin or shark heading up stream. Holding in one spot or going with the current, the trolling motor doesn't spook them at all most of the time.

    Thanks
  • mbowersmbowers Posts: 496 Deckhand
    I've been extremely happy with my Stealth charger as well. I've heard claims that it will destroy your batteries but I have not seen that. One operational point that I have followed is to always use battery 1 for the boat and never use battery 2 / TM battery 1. The 3 TM batteries should be discharging together and charging together that way. If you use battery 2 then the TM batteries are not all discharging together.

    I make sure to raise the motor when in heavy current as it is a lot of drag / power drain if left down. That's the reason to go to 36V motor: you have the power in a strong current if you need it.

    I can sneak up behind tarpon and snook waiting under bridges ala Bob LeMay method and they will happily feed on flies with a foot or two of the TM. They do not like it if the motor is stopped and started but slow speed changes seem to be tolerated.

    Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk
  • Renagade69Renagade69 Posts: 1,234 Officer
    http://www.dualpro.com/product/charge-on-the-run/

    I use the charge on the run because it charges the batteries individually and not in a series. The stealth does eventually screw up your batteries by charging them uneven. If you have 36 volt system you need a single bank and a dual bank.
    Hells Bay Estero Bay Boat and Hells Bay Marquesas
  • MkoonsMkoons Posts: 69 Deckhand
    Captray,

    Where are you keeping the boat? What's the cost monthly?
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