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Cotton Seed

GrizGriz Palm Beach Gardens, FloridaPosts: 9,892 Admin
We were at my wife's farm in SW Georgia. Cotton was just harvested and the fields were full of thousands of birds. I assume they were eating the cotton seed in the fields but couldn't find anything definitive on line. I don't know why they wouldn't.

Didn't get a good look at what variety of bird. Farmer across the street was shooting at the ones in his field, so I assume maybe dove or other game bird as there's nothing the fields at the moment that I'm aware of that they could damage.

Not a farmer nor bird hunter so have no idea.
The early bird may get the worm, but the Second Mouse gets the cheese. SW

:Griz

Replies

  • FinfinderFinfinder Posts: 9,999 Admiral
    Griz wrote: »
    We were at my wife's farm in SW Georgia. Cotton was just harvested and the fields were full of thousands of birds. I assume they were eating the cotton seed in the fields but couldn't find anything definitive on line. I don't know why they wouldn't.

    Didn't get a good look at what variety of bird. Farmer across the street was shooting at the ones in his field, so I assume maybe dove or other game bird as there's nothing the fields at the moment that I'm aware of that they could damage.

    Not a farmer nor bird hunter so have no idea.

    It probably wasn't cottonseed because the seed is extracted from the cotton during the ginning process and then fed to cattle. They may have planted wheat and the birds were eating the seeds. That may explain and be a good reason the farmer was shooting at the birds.
  • jcbcpajcbcpa Posts: 1,878 Captain
    Probably grass and weed seed.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
    I can't give you a sure-fire formula for success, but I can give you a formula for failure: try to please everybody all the time.
    Herbert Bayard Swope
    US editor & journalist (1882 - 1958)
  • GrizGriz Palm Beach Gardens, FloridaPosts: 9,892 Admin
    Finfinder wrote: »
    It probably wasn't cottonseed because the seed is extracted from the cotton during the ginning process and then fed to cattle. They may have planted wheat and the birds were eating the seeds. That may explain and be a good reason the farmer was shooting at the birds.

    There was tons of cotton that was not harvested, so still lots on the remainder of stalks and ground with seeds.
    The early bird may get the worm, but the Second Mouse gets the cheese. SW

    :Griz
  • FinfinderFinfinder Posts: 9,999 Admiral
    Griz wrote: »
    There was tons of cotton that was not harvested, so still lots on the remainder of stalks and ground with seeds.

    not tons because that's money !!! but I get what you were saying its possible they were eating the seeds. The cottonseed looks like a Q-Tip or ***** willow, the seed is inside.
  • dragon baitdragon bait Posts: 8,664 Admiral
    Gossypol Toxicity can occur in Non-ruminant animals from eating cotton seed,
  • silvergsilverg Posts: 1,456 Officer
    I thought this was going to be a music thread
  • HialeahAnglerHialeahAngler Posts: 9,612 Admiral
    Your wife has a farm and you have no part of it?
    friedpeacocks.jpg
  • GrizGriz Palm Beach Gardens, FloridaPosts: 9,892 Admin
    Gossypol Toxicity can occur in Non-ruminant animals from eating cotton seed,

    So they were just roosting? They were there for several days, if they're not feeding why would they be there so long? There has to be some attraction.
    The early bird may get the worm, but the Second Mouse gets the cheese. SW

    :Griz
  • Walker DogWalker Dog Posts: 2,155 Captain
    Gossypol Toxicity can occur in Non-ruminant animals from eating cotton seed,

    In ruminants too. Usually not an issue for them as long as there is a sufficient withdrawal time prior to breeding season (it reduces fertility at high levels).
  • 12bhunting12bhunting Posts: 291 Deckhand
    Maybe the fields had a little "extra" seeds thrown out to attract certain tasty birds.
  • mindyabinessmindyabiness Posts: 6,085 Admiral
    Griz wrote: »
    We were at my wife's farm in SW Georgia. Cotton was just harvested and the fields were full of thousands of birds. I assume they were eating the cotton seed in the fields but couldn't find anything definitive on line. I don't know why they wouldn't.

    Didn't get a good look at what variety of bird. Farmer across the street was shooting at the ones in his field, so I assume maybe dove or other game bird as there's nothing the fields at the moment that I'm aware of that they could damage.

    Not a farmer nor bird hunter so have no idea.

    Should there be a question mark here?
    Arguing with idiots is like playing chess with a pigeon... No matter how good you are, the bird is going to crap on the board and strut around like it won anyway.
  • GrizGriz Palm Beach Gardens, FloridaPosts: 9,892 Admin
    Should there be a question mark here?

    Where??
    The early bird may get the worm, but the Second Mouse gets the cheese. SW

    :Griz
  • stc1993stc1993 Albany, GA Carrabelle, FLPosts: 7,193 Admiral
    It's probably starlings. They're flocks of thousands that roost in SW GA.

    They get the oil out of the cottonseed before they feed the remains to cows.
  • GrizGriz Palm Beach Gardens, FloridaPosts: 9,892 Admin
    Your wife has a farm and you have no part of it?

    She inherited the farm from her father. Why would I?
    The early bird may get the worm, but the Second Mouse gets the cheese. SW

    :Griz
  • LODI QUACKERLODI QUACKER Posts: 149 Deckhand
    no they were not eating the cotton seed. Could have been weed seeds from other plants growing in the rows which is bad form for a cotton crop. Probably wheat spread after harvest to shoot doves or recrop.
  • GrizGriz Palm Beach Gardens, FloridaPosts: 9,892 Admin
    no they were not eating the cotton seed. Could have been weed seeds from other plants growing in the rows which is bad form for a cotton crop. Probably wheat spread after harvest to shoot doves or recrop.

    No. they did not put anything else down and I doubt weeds. They spray a defoliant right before harvest.

    Then it's on to either another Cotton crop or peanuts.
    The early bird may get the worm, but the Second Mouse gets the cheese. SW

    :Griz
  • jcbcpajcbcpa Posts: 1,878 Captain
    The defoliant wouldnt have an effect on the weeds and grass other than to defoliate it. It was either pigweed seed or buffalo grass seed or both or something similar. Cotton seed does not get delinted and spread by harvest.

    Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
    I can't give you a sure-fire formula for success, but I can give you a formula for failure: try to please everybody all the time.
    Herbert Bayard Swope
    US editor & journalist (1882 - 1958)
  • FletchFletch Merritt Island, FLPosts: 2,455 Moderator
    Most of the seeds are removed by the milling process during harvest. A lot of the farmers in the area will pile the seeds to let them go through a heat and kill off undesirable grass and pigweed seeds. Then they spread the cotton seeds on the field to build the soil.

    At least that's what I've been told.

    My guess is the birds were after something else.
    "Ninety percent I'll spend on good times, women and Irish whiskey. The other ten percent, I'll probably waste..."
    -- Tug McGraw on getting a raise

    Get Down Fishing Charters - Port Canaveral, Florida
  • LODI QUACKERLODI QUACKER Posts: 149 Deckhand
    Good freaking NIght people!! Do yall live in the south? Ever heard of Eli Whitney? The cotton picker picks the cotton, that's it. It is then shipped off to the cotton gin to be processed, this is where the seeds are removed. There is no equipment currently available to do both steps at one time. Now farmers do use gin trash and cotton seeds for feed and fertilizer, but that is after the ginning process. Also cotton seed is used for lots of things, even oils for cooking, better than peanut oil for frying.
  • jcbcpajcbcpa Posts: 1,878 Captain
    Good freaking NIght people!! Do yall live in the south? Ever heard of Eli Whitney? The cotton picker picks the cotton, that's it. It is then shipped off to the cotton gin to be processed, this is where the seeds are removed. There is no equipment currently available to do both steps at one time. Now farmers do use gin trash and cotton seeds for feed and fertilizer, but that is after the ginning process. Also cotton seed is used for lots of things, even oils for cooking, better than peanut oil for frying.
    :)
    I can't give you a sure-fire formula for success, but I can give you a formula for failure: try to please everybody all the time.
    Herbert Bayard Swope
    US editor & journalist (1882 - 1958)
  • FinfinderFinfinder Posts: 9,999 Admiral
    Good freaking NIght people!! Do yall live in the south? Ever heard of Eli Whitney? The cotton picker picks the cotton, that's it. It is then shipped off to the cotton gin to be processed, this is where the seeds are removed. There is no equipment currently available to do both steps at one time. Now farmers do use gin trash and cotton seeds for feed and fertilizer, but that is after the ginning process. Also cotton seed is used for lots of things, even oils for cooking, better than peanut oil for frying.

    like post #2 on this subject

    :rolleyes
  • MACDMACD Lee CountyPosts: 4,954 Captain
    Now when them cotton bowls get rotten you can't pick very much cotton.
  • LODI QUACKERLODI QUACKER Posts: 149 Deckhand
    Finfinder wrote: »
    like post #2 on this subject

    :rolleyes

    Just like post #2.
  • wahoowacker01wahoowacker01 Posts: 1,470 Officer
    Cotton bowls? Bolls
  • frankfrank Posts: 13,292 AG
    Cotton bowls? Bolls

    joe?
  • SchmidtySchmidty Posts: 6,814 Admiral
    ...how about "balls"...
  • wahoowacker01wahoowacker01 Posts: 1,470 Officer
    Balls would be after the bolls open right?
  • Reptile DysfunctionReptile Dysfunction LP - Edge of the Known UniversePosts: 3,300 Captain
    Weevils - RWH
    "If you think health care is expensive now, wait until you see what it costs when it's free" - P. J. O'Rourke
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