Dead Fish...Everywhere

Just a friendly heads up. Went out yesterday with a friend to put some hours on his new boat.
Millions of dead fish seen from Pinellas Point to Bunces pass, eggmont key and even bean point up along the beach of Anna Maria.Ft. Desoto had keeper sized red grouper floating along the Bunces path channel.
Mostly Pinfish and Mullet, but snook, snapper and grouper as well.

Hard not to blame the hundreds of millions of gallons of sewage released for boosting this algae bloom.
I guess that's for the politics section.

Good luck out there!

Replies

  • guifriguifri Posts: 36 Greenhorn
    Too bad. I'm on AMI and will have a boat for the next week. Too much wind offshore. Dead fish and dark water inside. )-:
  • CaptJCaptJ Posts: 642 Officer
    Our Gov says no problem, let'r rip!
  • Matt822Matt822 Posts: 149 Officer
    I had a friend get a serious bacterial infection from the water inside the bay a few weeks back so be aware of that as well.
  • DarcyDarcy Posts: 1,711 Captain
    Everything is ok. Don't panic.
    It will all be better when the rain stops.
    Red tide is after all, naturally occurring.
    Smh.
    "No i'm NOT Darcizzle!":blowkiss


    https://captainsforcleanwater.org
  • guifriguifri Posts: 36 Greenhorn
    Got some nice spanish mackerels right in front of Holmes Beach. Are they eatable or is it better not to eat the Fish out of that area?
  • FlatsFrenzyFlatsFrenzy Posts: 893 Officer
    Tons of bait off Sand Key Beach today.

    It was too windy for the fly rod, so I threw the net for the kids and let them put a few baits back out on spin gear.

    Got cut off a few times, so I figure macks or smallish sharks.
    -
    Chris
    Gulf Coast of FL
    @flatsfrenzy #flyonly #onelessspinrod
  • CaptainBlyCaptainBly Posts: 1,931 Captain
    guifri wrote: »
    Got some nice spanish mackerels right in front of Holmes Beach. Are they eatable or is it better not to eat the Fish out of that area?

    According to an article in the paper, fish with fins are fine, cook them all the way through to make absolute sure, ie, don't eat them rare....things like oysters and other suction feeders should be avoided.

    http://www.tampabay.com/news/environment/water/is-it-safe-to-enter-tampa-bay-after-sewage-spills/2293646


    Is it safe to eat the fish you catch?

    Scientists we talked to broke it down this way: fin fish — redfish, seatrout and snook, for example — are safe to eat. Exercise caution with shellfish, however.

    "These human pathogens in the sewage impacted waters typically don't make their way into the muscle tissue of fin fish," Ulrich said. Wash you hands, wash filets with clean water and cook the fish all the way through, though, he said.

    "Most importantly, proper cooking," Ulrich said. "If there are any viable organisms that did make their way through the cleaning process in fin fish muscle tissue, it usually is taken care of by proper cooking and proper temperatures. Don't eat your fin fish medium rare."

    As far as filter feeders (think clams, oysters, mussels), be careful, Ulrich says. "They're very good at concentrating pathogens that are in the water columns," he said. Any bacteria or viruses filtering through a filter feeder "gets concentrated in the muscle tissue. They're not really good at expelling it. If you were in the practice of eating or undercooked oysters or clams from the greater Tampa Bay area, I would definitely advise against that."

    The state Department of Agriculture monitors shellfish conditions. As of Wednesday, the Boca Ciega Bay area was closed off due to "excessive rainfall."
    In Loving Memory of James Zielske, January 19, 1957-July 5, 2013
  • Samy84Samy84 Posts: 4 Greenhorn
    Took the family out on the boat to Egmont Key on Sunday. There were still a few dead fish left on shore. Saw thousands of bait fish in 2-6 feet of water. Even saw some large snook chasing the bait in the surf. If I would of taken any tackle I would have fish some.
  • guifriguifri Posts: 36 Greenhorn
    Thanks, Capt'n.
    CaptainBly wrote: »
    According to an article in the paper, fish with fins are fine, cook them all the way through to make absolute sure, ie, don't eat them rare....things like oysters and other suction feeders should be avoided.

    http://www.tampabay.com/news/environment/water/is-it-safe-to-enter-tampa-bay-after-sewage-spills/2293646


    Is it safe to eat the fish you catch?

    Scientists we talked to broke it down this way: fin fish — redfish, seatrout and snook, for example — are safe to eat. Exercise caution with shellfish, however.

    "These human pathogens in the sewage impacted waters typically don't make their way into the muscle tissue of fin fish," Ulrich said. Wash you hands, wash filets with clean water and cook the fish all the way through, though, he said.

    "Most importantly, proper cooking," Ulrich said. "If there are any viable organisms that did make their way through the cleaning process in fin fish muscle tissue, it usually is taken care of by proper cooking and proper temperatures. Don't eat your fin fish medium rare."

    As far as filter feeders (think clams, oysters, mussels), be careful, Ulrich says. "They're very good at concentrating pathogens that are in the water columns," he said. Any bacteria or viruses filtering through a filter feeder "gets concentrated in the muscle tissue. They're not really good at expelling it. If you were in the practice of eating or undercooked oysters or clams from the greater Tampa Bay area, I would definitely advise against that."

    The state Department of Agriculture monitors shellfish conditions. As of Wednesday, the Boca Ciega Bay area was closed off due to "excessive rainfall."
  • Soda PopinskiSoda Popinski GrovelandPosts: 9,217 Admiral
    How is the bay looking? Any improvement? Was thinking of hitting it Saturday morning out of Cockroach Bay ramp.
    People use statistics the way a drunk uses a street light, for support rather than illumination.
Sign In or Register to comment.