INSHORE question and answer section and FAQ's

capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 9,409 Moderator
This section is for questions about rigs and tactics relating to inshore shallow water fishing and boating.

We have some very knowledgeable forum members that are willing to help with answers here and in the offshore section. Please post accordingly and check here for answers first as it may save time not having to wait for replies.

capt louie
"You'll get your weather"

Replies

  • floridafanfloridafan Posts: 65 Deckhand
    Hey Capt Louie - I have struggled with tides when fishing on the inside. If we have a high tide at say 12:00 Noon, what is the differential back behind Lowes Bay around Thousand Mile Creek or Demory Creek?

    Same for Porpoise Bay and Oyster Creek south of Homosassa. I cant seem to recognize the pattern yet...
  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 9,409 Moderator
    FF , I haven't fished that region very much but I see the Withlacoochee river mouth and cedar key tides are only 7 minutes apart.
    Lowes bay can't be too different ? Maybe 10-15 minutes later ?

    Others here can answer better.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • 4WARD4WARD Cross Creek,FLPosts: 870 Officer
    This sight has a pretty good breakdown of the area.

    http://www.saltwatertides.com/dynamic.dir/floridagulfsites.html
    "I hate graveyards and old pawn shops
    For they always bring me tears
    I can't forgive the way they rob me
    Of my childhood souvenirs"... John Prine
  • floridafanfloridafan Posts: 65 Deckhand
    4ward, that is the site I use, However there is a huge difference in times between Mason Creek and the backside of Porpoise Bay (hours). Also Withlacoochee Entrance and Demory Creek are very different as well due to Reef Structures and Points like Mangrove Point and Porpoise Point.

    There is a big difference! Running Petty Creek is different from Withlacoochee Entrance and Mason Creek...
  • 4WARD4WARD Cross Creek,FLPosts: 870 Officer
    I know from years of fishing the Shell Mound area that the WIND is a huge factor.
    Maybe that is the variable to consider?:shrug
    If the Mason creek tides are accurate and Porpoise Bay is not consistent, that would be my bet.
    "I hate graveyards and old pawn shops
    For they always bring me tears
    I can't forgive the way they rob me
    Of my childhood souvenirs"... John Prine
  • VertigoVertigo Yankeetown, FLPosts: 590 Officer
    I fish the area frequently, and although there may not be much difference between Yankeetown and Cedar Key, there is a significant difference between Yankeetown and Lows Bay/Eleven Prong/Turtle Creek and the creeks along the way. I'd guess that Eleven Prong is at least an hour behind the mouth of the Withlacoochee. No wind today and at predicted high tide at the mouth of the Withlacoochee, tide was still roaring in at Eleven Prong.
  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 9,409 Moderator
    Vertigo wrote: »
    I fish the area frequently, and although there may not be much difference between Yankeetown and Cedar Key, there is a significant difference between Yankeetown and Lows Bay/Eleven Prong/Turtle Creek and the creeks along the way. I'd guess that Eleven Prong is at least an hour behind the mouth of the Withlacoochee. No wind today and at predicted high tide at the mouth of the Withlacoochee, tide was still roaring in at Eleven Prong.

    Thanks , so to answer the OP question. Aprox. 30 to 45 minute delay depending on moon and wind in that area.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • floridafanfloridafan Posts: 65 Deckhand
    Thanks Vertigo! If I draw about 8-10"of water can I explore back behind Eleven Prong and The north side of Lowes Bay? I have a prop and Trim Tabs.
  • VertigoVertigo Yankeetown, FLPosts: 590 Officer
    Floridafan, If you know where you're going you can easily navigate Eleven Prong and Lows Bay drawing 10" of water, even at medium tides. But....you had better know where you're going because even at high tide there are a lot of things to hit. Two days ago I took my Aquasport 22-2 which draws about 14" to the bottom of the skeg and planes in about 10" up to Turtle Creek Bay, running across the north end of Lows, and up Eleven Prong. I ran Eleven Prong at about 10:30, which was at about half way between high and low, maybe lower because of the wind. Actually, high tide may be more risky since the things you're likely to hit are hidden. Best way to do it is to go with someone who knows a good route. Next best way is to pick out way points from Google Earth or here: http://earthnc.com/online-nautical-charts. Go slow using the waypoints on your GPS and if the track works, record it. Then you'll have a route you can run with confidence, even at high tide.
    10933812_1006682199342698_4282427570755868512_n.jpg?oh=d0ee94c239285475e0b907cc30d006d0&oe=5593631A&__gda__=1433805603_8b0c9bdf853ab5830df40ee655d9f68f
  • Jim311Jim311 Posts: 4,843 Captain
    As far as the tides around Lowe Bay I've noticed the tides in Waccasassa can sometimes lag HOURS behind the tides at Cedar Key. I use it to my advantage when planning a trip. If I can't seem to make it in time for the high tide at CK or elsewhere, I know I can have some extra time to make it at Wac. As mentioned the wind can heavily effect this as well. The area is **** near unfishable on a strong low tide though.
  • floridafanfloridafan Posts: 65 Deckhand
    Pretty Boat! Thank you!

    Thank you for the link to the program and app. Better than Google Earth, for sure!
  • floridafanfloridafan Posts: 65 Deckhand
    Vertigo, Do you run inside that large oyster bar just west of Jubb Island by Fuller Creek and shoot North to Hodges,or are you on the outside of that large, crescent shaped, pretty bar?
  • VertigoVertigo Yankeetown, FLPosts: 590 Officer
    There are three or four routes I use going north to Hodges. It really depends on where I want to fish along the way, the wind, and the time of day and tide. If I'm in a hurry, I run west of the big bar, but if I want fish, I usually fish along the east side of the bar going north.
  • Biggary16Biggary16 Posts: 468 Deckhand
    Vertigo wrote: »
    Floridafan, If you know where you're going you can easily navigate Eleven Prong and Lows Bay drawing 10" of water, even at medium tides. But....you had better know where you're going because even at high tide there are a lot of things to hit. Two days ago I took my Aquasport 22-2 which draws about 14" to the bottom of the skeg and planes in about 10" up to Turtle Creek Bay, running across the north end of Lows, and up Eleven Prong. I ran Eleven Prong at about 10:30, which was at about half way between high and low, maybe lower because of the wind. Actually, high tide may be more risky since the things you're likely to hit are hidden. Best way to do it is to go with someone who knows a good route. Next best way is to pick out way points from Google Earth or here: http://earthnc.com/online-nautical-charts. Go slow using the waypoints on your GPS and if the track works, record it. Then you'll have a route you can run with confidence, even at high tide.
    10933812_1006682199342698_4282427570755868512_n.jpg?oh=d0ee94c239285475e0b907cc30d006d0&oe=5593631A&__gda__=1433805603_8b0c9bdf853ab5830df40ee655d9f68f

    Wow Vertico! I always hear boats running way back in there but i thought they were all airboats or jet drives. That takes some cajones or lots of time and experience like you have. That's one of my goals this year to explore back in there but the water visibility always slows me down. Even idling you can't see the rocks.
  • VertigoVertigo Yankeetown, FLPosts: 590 Officer
    It only takes cajones if you're stupid about it. Do a little research, go slow, be patient, and the worst that can happen is a few nicks in your skeg. Even an airboat or a jet foot will run aground if the captain doesn't use a little smarts. Once you have a few safe routes recorded, then you can run them at speed.
  • TW22TW22 Posts: 37 Deckhand
    One thing about the Waccassassa: it is loaded with big rocks. It is literally like a mine field. But I guess this is all relative to the draft of your boat. This becomes a problem for me when there is a lot of rain, because it makes the water even darker than it usually is, due to run off: Sometimes you don't see the rock until it's too late, even at idle. That's a hard lesson learned when you are patching that gel-coat. I saw one guy wreck his airboat on indian head rock one time like two years ago at an extreme high tide (no offense if that guy is on here) and it was ugly.

    I think vertigo's advice is spot-on. When I first started fishing that area, I didn't skirt the edges. Instead, I like to pick a creek or area I want to fish and then get to it from deep water. I usually put in from CK, so if a thunderstorm hits, I need to be able to get out quickly. I usually mark a waypoint at the last two foot hole I encounter while going in on trolling motor, that way I know where I can nail a safe hole shot on the way out if I need to get out in a hurry, and safely get to open, deeper water to escape the storm.

    Keep this in mind too. The quality fish you find in the Waccassassa, can be found in much safer areas to fish. But if you do go, make sure you have a working VHF, cell phone, etc. and pick your days so you don't get cornered by a fast approaching storm. Nothing is worse than trying to navigate out of there, through a gale force summer storm with white caps in water only 2 feet deep.

    Vertigo: that is a beautiful boat.
  • floridafanfloridafan Posts: 65 Deckhand
    Great Idea on marking that hole!
  • TideUpTideUp Posts: 126 Officer
    Alright so I usually use a bone spook Jr. for top water fishing but to be honest, it doesn't produce like it should even when I know there are fish there. What's a good top water for reds and snook? It doesn't have to be your secret plug, but just a solid one that will get either if they're hungry.
    Gainesville Kayak Anglers Club http://www.gkaclub.com
  • VertigoVertigo Yankeetown, FLPosts: 590 Officer
    For topwater I like the Rapala Skitter Walk. In honesty, I don't think the color makes much difference. I've used the bone, the redfish, the silver mullet, the speckled trout, the gold mullet, etc. and had about the same luck with any of them. I've got a fishing buddy who uses Badonk-a-donk and does about as well or better than I do. I think finding the fish when they're feeding and presenting the lure properly is way more important than the specific lure.
  • johnk434johnk434 Posts: 8 Greenhorn
    Capt Louie, I have a question about Cedar Key- is it a rocky as Crystal River is? I am planning a trip this month and wanted to see if it was any easier to run on plane in the shallows up there.
    Thanks!
    John
  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 9,409 Moderator
    johnk434 wrote: »
    Capt Louie, I have a question about Cedar Key- is it a rocky as Crystal River is? I am planning a trip this month and wanted to see if it was any easier to run on plane in the shallows up there.
    Thanks!
    John


    Lots of oyster bars there and water viz is usually stained. Be careful outside of the markers. You don't want to hit bottom no matter what type it is.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • keithacolemankeithacoleman Posts: 17 Greenhorn
    Thanks vertigo... I have been looking for an online chart site...
  • keithacolemankeithacoleman Posts: 17 Greenhorn
    Vertigo wrote: »
    Floridafan, If you know where you're going you can easily navigate Eleven Prong and Lows Bay drawing 10" of water, even at medium tides. But....you had better know where you're going because even at high tide there are a lot of things to hit. Two days ago I took my Aquasport 22-2 which draws about 14" to the bottom of the skeg and planes in about 10" up to Turtle Creek Bay, running across the north end of Lows, and up Eleven Prong. I ran Eleven Prong at about 10:30, which was at about half way between high and low, maybe lower because of the wind. Actually, high tide may be more risky since the things you're likely to hit are hidden. Best way to do it is to go with someone who knows a good route. Next best way is to pick out way points from Google Earth or here: http://earthnc.com/online-nautical-charts. Go slow using the waypoints on your GPS and if the track works, record it. Then you'll have a route you can run with confidence, even at high tide.
    10933812_1006682199342698_4282427570755868512_n.jpg?oh=d0ee94c239285475e0b907cc30d006d0&oe=5593631A&__gda__=1433805603_8b0c9bdf853ab5830df40ee655d9f68f

    Thanks I have been looking for a site online like this one...
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