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St. Joe Bay scallops

Looks like there will not be a season on 2016 in St. Joe Bay due to last years red tide. I can't seem to find a link yet, but look FWC to announce it soon.
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Replies

  • CynicalCynical Posts: 274 Deckhand
    Oof. That's going to destroy some people down there.
  • NOLE66NOLE66 Posts: 1,630 Officer
    Looks like there will not be a season on 2016 in St. Joe Bay due to last years red tide. I can't seem to find a link yet, but look FWC to announce it soon.

    http://www.mypanhandle.com/news/fwc-could-close-scallops-in-st-joe-bay-for-2-years

    This will kill St. Joe. More and more development west of St. Joe is contributing to the red tides. We may begin to see a situation similar to what southwest Florida has experienced for over a decade, constant, consistent harmful algal blooms. Water quality in Choctawhatchee Bay has declined quite a bit due to development and all the things that go with it. Sad
  • cc13cc13 Posts: 548 Officer
    Why would there be "no season?" There can still be a season, just with no scallops. Often there are no scallops in Lanark. That doesn't mean they close the season. I don't get the "no season" reason.
  • grouper sandwichgrouper sandwich Posts: 532 Officer
    cc13 wrote: »
    Why would there be "no season?" There can still be a season, just with no scallops. Often there are no scallops in Lanark. That doesn't mean they close the season. I don't get the "no season" reason.


    They said the population is not strong enough to support a season and allowing one to happen would exasperate the situation and prolong the recovery of the resource. The closure will be from St. Vincent Island west including St. Joe Bay.
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  • grouper sandwichgrouper sandwich Posts: 532 Officer
    FWC hosts bay scallop meeting in Port St. Joe April 27



    Scientific monitoring of bay scallops in St. Joseph Bay indicates that the bay scallop population has declined severely due to impacts of red tide. As a result, the bay scallop population is too low to sustain and recover from an open season for scalloping this summer. To help ensure the bay scallop population can recover as quickly as possible, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is making arrangements to cancel the 2016 harvest season in state waters west of St. Vincent Island including St. Joseph Bay.

    To provide more information about this situation and address questions, FWC is hosting a meeting starting at 5 p.m. Eastern Time, Wednesday, April 27 at the Gulf County BOCC Meeting Room, Robert M. Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd. in Port St. Joe. FWC research and management staff will be on hand, along with representatives of local government, to field questions about the pending season cancellation and the plan to speed recovery of the local scallop population and minimize economic impacts.

    A red tide bloom impacted waters off Gulf County from September through December of 2015, which is also when scallops spawn and scallop larvae settle in that area. As a result the local scallop population appears to have been heavily impacted, and may have collapsed. Monitoring efforts conducted by the FWC’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute have been unable to find evidence of any scallop recruitment to St. Joseph Bay from the 2015 spawn. Red tide has not been present in St. Joseph Bay since January 2016.

    FWC, working in cooperation with the Mote Marine Laboratory, identifies and monitors harmful red tides, evaluates their impacts, and provides technical support for communities experiencing impacts. These efforts are made possible through an annual appropriation of $825,854 approved by the Florida Legislature and Governor Rick Scott.

    On top of this, collaborations between FWRI and its partners have increased over the years, resulting in a tightly coordinated framework of fieldwork, research and outreach efforts.

    Restricting the scallop harvest in all waters west of St. Vincent Island could help the St. Joseph Bay scallop population recover faster by ensuring that any scallops that did survive the red tide are available to reproduce this fall. It would also allow FWRI scientists time to implement restoration efforts such as stock enhancement, which should help speed recovery.


    Sent from my iPhone 6 using Tapatalk
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  • SloughSlough S.w. Ga./ St. JamesPosts: 5,735 Admiral
    Bad for St Joe, good for the business's to the east.
    I didn't say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you
  • cc13cc13 Posts: 548 Officer
    I learned something. I had never heard of scallop season being closed. Thanks
  • eddiejoeeddiejoe Posts: 602 Officer
    ferris1248 wrote: »
    It won't affect St. Joe that much if it's for a year or so.

    They need to ban the use of fertilizers, antibacterial soaps and pesticides in the coastal counties.


    Ferris:
    Not a bad idea, but I don't believe there is any evidence those substances affect the prevalence of red tide.
  • SAENoleSAENole Posts: 11,477 AG
    The bears and red snapper are eating all the scallops.
    Warning Level 2
  • NOLE66NOLE66 Posts: 1,630 Officer
    Spoke with a friend who is a biologist for a state agency that measures the scallop population in SJB. I was told there are practically no scallops in the bay. Lowest densities they've ever observed since they started measuring. Folks can scallop all they want, but they'll go home with nothing. If they allow it to open it will be false advertising and few will be fooled after the first week of the season as word spreads.
  • alligatoroballigatorob Posts: 197 Officer
    ferris1248 wrote: »
    They need to ban the use of fertilizers, antibacterial soaps and pesticides in the coastal counties.
    You are right, its this kind of runoff that does a lot of damage to our waters, salt and fresh. Without septic tanks and fertilizers Wakulla Springs would be clear again.
  • illinoisfishermanillinoisfisherman Posts: 5,466 Admiral
    no St Joe will put additional pressure on other harvesting areas. That will be more bad news next year.
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