female players accuse U.S. soccer federation of wage discrimination

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Replies

  • gregglgreggl Posts: 21,594 Officer
    riverdiver wrote: »
    Minimum wage? The women on the US team aren't making minimum wage.

    this too:

    As the complaint states, both male and female American soccer players get a $15,000 individual bonus for qualifying for the Olympic team — and another $15,000 for making the roster. But it also notes that U.S. Soccer has different per diem rates to cover athletes' costs, with men receiving $75 a day for international venues while the women get $60.
    http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/03/31/472522790/members-of-u-s-women-s-national-team-file-federal-equal-pay-complaint

    and:

    On Thursday’s national conference call previewing the inaugural National Women’s Soccer League season, league executive director Cheryl Bailey said players’ salaries will range from $6,000-$30,000.

    forums.floridasportsman.com/showthread.php?218137-female-players-accuse-U-S-soccer-federation-of-wage-discrimination/page2
  • grady30wagrady30wa Posts: 10,161 AG
    This is a dumb thread. Those who bring in the revenue get the big pay checks

    Almost nobody watches women's sports
    Schadenfreude. November 8, 2016
  • gregglgreggl Posts: 21,594 Officer
    grady30wa wrote: »
    This is a dumb thread. Those who bring in the revenue get the big pay checks

    Almost nobody watches women's sports

    doesnt matter :) cat videos make money.
  • riverdiverriverdiver Posts: 2,024 Captain
    greggl wrote: »
    this too:

    As the complaint states, both male and female American soccer players get a $15,000 individual bonus for qualifying for the Olympic team — and another $15,000 for making the roster. But it also notes that U.S. Soccer has different per diem rates to cover athletes' costs, with men receiving $75 a day for international venues while the women get $60.
    http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2016/03/31/472522790/members-of-u-s-women-s-national-team-file-federal-equal-pay-complaint

    and:

    On Thursday’s national conference call previewing the inaugural National Women’s Soccer League season, league executive director Cheryl Bailey said players’ salaries will range from $6,000-$30,000.

    forums.floridasportsman.com/showthread.php?218137-female-players-accuse-U-S-soccer-federation-of-wage-discrimination/page2

    Per diem for the National teams playing internationally should be the same.

    The National Women's Soccer League is different from the US National team. It's another soccer league that's taken the place of the multiple women's pro soccer leagues that have already failed due to poor attendance and buckets of money lost.

    How much do you propose they make when they can't draw more than a low level A league baseball team?
  • riverdiverriverdiver Posts: 2,024 Captain
    greggl wrote: »
    doesnt matter :) cat videos make money.

    Well, there you go.

    There's exponentially more interest in cat videos than women's soccer.

    Case closed.
  • gregglgreggl Posts: 21,594 Officer
    They placed well. When do you think it is the best time to press for a raise?
  • navigator2navigator2 Posts: 22,472 AG
    greggl wrote: »
    They placed well. When do you think it is the best time to press for a raise?

    When somebody actually care enough to watch them, then advertisers will step up and pay more. Then the promoters can be pressured into giving them more money. What are you proposing, a cable TV tax to cover PBS, antique roadshow, and women's tiddlywinks? :grin
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • gregglgreggl Posts: 21,594 Officer
    navigator2 wrote: »
    When somebody actually care enough to watch them, then advertisers will step up and pay more. Then the promoters can be pressured into giving them more money. What are you proposing, a cable TV tax to cover PBS, antique roadshow, and women's tiddlywinks? :grin

    no, they need to keep pushing as there isn't any actual pressure to do so naturally.
    it surged in popularity and revenue due to the wins. leverage AND the men's contract differentials that are a great place to start that negotiation.

    Videogame esports... same thing.
  • navigator2navigator2 Posts: 22,472 AG
    cpr wrote: »
    And the US women have played in the final at least 3 times. The men zero. So the women have earned something where the US men haven't.

    Strength of schedule matters. :grin
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • navigator2navigator2 Posts: 22,472 AG
    greggl wrote: »
    no, they need to keep pushing as there isn't any actual pressure to do so naturally.
    it surged in popularity and revenue due to the wins. leverage AND the men's contract differentials that are a great place to start that negotiation.

    Videogame esports... same thing.

    If the product they are putting on the field is attractive enough other promoters will come along and offer them a better deal through a new league and deal. That's how this works. It has happened before in professional football and the players used it as a bargaining chip to increase NFL pay scales. Those leagues are long gone and buried because they didn't have staying power and at some point the market is oversaturated with too much exposure. However, if there is money to be made, someone will come along and pay the players more for their services. If there isn't enough interest to do so, things will remain the same.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
  • gregglgreggl Posts: 21,594 Officer
    give me some years and incidents where players 'waited'.

    then some strikes
  • cprcpr Posts: 9,309 Admiral
    riverdiver wrote: »
    Yet they still can't beat High School 16U boys teams.

    Looks like a real possibility they're beating teams from countries that care even less about women's soccer than the US does.

    My point is they are on the tube more often and generate more TV income then the US men's team. I don't disagree that overall most woman's professional sports, including soccer and especially the WNBA are unwatchable. And title 9 is a stupid law that has damaged college sports. It is this isolated case where the women have out done the men and they should get winners pay.
    "The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function." F. Scott Fitzgerald

    "Prediction is very difficult, especially if it's about the future." Niels Bohr
  • gregglgreggl Posts: 21,594 Officer
    when was the last time 'round here we've seen this crew cheering anyone's increase in pay?
  • FinfinderFinfinder Posts: 9,945 Admiral
    greggl wrote: »
    give me some years and incidents where players 'waited'.

    then some strikes

    they got locked out
  • gregglgreggl Posts: 21,594 Officer
    Finfinder wrote: »
    they got locked out

    at least acknowledge that there is a history of 'creative finance' in professional sports :)
  • FinfinderFinfinder Posts: 9,945 Admiral
    greggl wrote: »
    at least acknowledge that there is a history of 'creative finance' in professional sports :)

    what you are talking about


    Of the major sports the NFL is the only league without guaranteed contracts
  • gregglgreggl Posts: 21,594 Officer
    Finfinder wrote: »
    what you are talking about

    Of the major sports the NFL is the only league without guaranteed contracts

    collusion.
  • FinfinderFinfinder Posts: 9,945 Admiral
    greggl wrote: »




    LOL really !! Barry Bonds earned over 188 millions dollars in his career and was in the middle of the steroid era involved with Balco and now is shunned from the baseball hall of fame

    why don't you stick to things you actually know like Dungeons and Dragons
  • gregglgreggl Posts: 21,594 Officer
    http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052748704335904574497433535880354

    "The negotiations, though, were poisoned before they began. An atmosphere of mistrust that had developed in the late 1980s when the owners colluded, in violation of the Basic Agreement between owners and players, to hold down salaries by, among other tactics, not bidding on free agents. In 1990, after three rulings against them by neutral arbitrators, the owners were forced to pay a whopping $280 million to the players.

    Commissioner Fay Vincent was unaware of the owners' plans to collude and publicly expressed his disapproval when they were revealed—which probably cost him his job. "The owners," says economist Andrew Zimbalist, "got rid of Vincent precisely so he wouldn't disrupt their assault on the players." Finally dispensing with the illusion that the commissioner of baseball should be neutral, the owners then hired one of their own, Bud Selig, owner of the Milwaukee Brewers, to represent their interests as the new commissioner.

    From that point the strike was inevitable, and on Aug. 12, 1994 the players walked out. On Jan. 1, 1995, Congress, with nothing better to do, introduced no fewer than five bills aimed at ending the strike; Congress struck out on all five pitches. On Jan. 13, the owners authorized the use of what they called "replacement players." The union called them scabs. Mr. Fehr cannily asked exactly who the replacement players were replacing, since the owners still had the players under contract.

    On Jan. 26, President Bill Clinton ordered the owners and players to resume bargaining. Both sides nodded politely at the president and continued to stare each other down.

    The strike might still be on now if not for a complaint, filed on March 27, 1995, by the National Labor Relations Board accusing the owners of unfair labor practices. Two days later, the players agreed to return to work if a U.S. District Court Judge supported the complaint. One did: On March 31 Federal Judge Sonia Sotomayor issued a preliminary injunction against the owners. On April 2, just 24 hours before the originally scheduled opening day, the strike came to an end. The season was shortened to 144 games, and the first game was played on April 25."

    Sure.
  • FinfinderFinfinder Posts: 9,945 Admiral
    greggl wrote: »
    http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052748704335904574497433535880354

    "The negotiations, though, were poisoned before they began. An atmosphere of mistrust that had developed in the late 1980s when the owners colluded, in violation of the Basic Agreement between owners and players, to hold down salaries by, among other tactics, not bidding on free agents. In 1990, after three rulings against them by neutral arbitrators, the owners were forced to pay a whopping $280 million to the players.

    Commissioner Fay Vincent was unaware of the owners' plans to collude and publicly expressed his disapproval when they were revealed—which probably cost him his job. "The owners," says economist Andrew Zimbalist, "got rid of Vincent precisely so he wouldn't disrupt their assault on the players." Finally dispensing with the illusion that the commissioner of baseball should be neutral, the owners then hired one of their own, Bud Selig, owner of the Milwaukee Brewers, to represent their interests as the new commissioner.

    From that point the strike was inevitable, and on Aug. 12, 1994 the players walked out. On Jan. 1, 1995, Congress, with nothing better to do, introduced no fewer than five bills aimed at ending the strike; Congress struck out on all five pitches. On Jan. 13, the owners authorized the use of what they called "replacement players." The union called them scabs. Mr. Fehr cannily asked exactly who the replacement players were replacing, since the owners still had the players under contract.

    On Jan. 26, President Bill Clinton ordered the owners and players to resume bargaining. Both sides nodded politely at the president and continued to stare each other down.

    The strike might still be on now if not for a complaint, filed on March 27, 1995, by the National Labor Relations Board accusing the owners of unfair labor practices. Two days later, the players agreed to return to work if a U.S. District Court Judge supported the complaint. One did: On March 31 Federal Judge Sonia Sotomayor issued a preliminary injunction against the owners. On April 2, just 24 hours before the originally scheduled opening day, the strike came to an end. The season was shortened to 144 games, and the first game was played on April 25."

    Sure.


    I don't understand what your point is ? Everybody knows pro sports owner collude and will always have the upper hand, since you are not a fan you lack understanding society accepts this.

    The the women's soccer team will more than likely get a better contract but the fans will reject them if they strike. In the end its just a game.
  • gregglgreggl Posts: 21,594 Officer
    Finfinder wrote: »
    In the end its just a game.

    We are playing the same game, economically.
  • FinfinderFinfinder Posts: 9,945 Admiral
    greggl wrote: »
    We are playing the same game, economically.

    why are you changing the subject sports are an exception

    I don't understand you, its like you are the last guy in the world to figure out life is rigged. IMO Try to work and be creative within the rules you are given, something you can control. You spend too much time pointing out the obvious.
  • gregglgreggl Posts: 21,594 Officer
    Finfinder wrote: »
    You spend too much time pointing out the obvious.

    we spent too little time actually fighting against this.

    which makes it more difficult for those who are fighting. the lack of societal support is stifling enforcement.
  • FinfinderFinfinder Posts: 9,945 Admiral
    greggl wrote: »
    we spent too little time actually fighting against this.

    which makes it more difficult for those who are fighting. the lack of societal support is stifling enforcement.

    if we are talking about the topic spot on, because no one cares that rich people who get to play a sport for a living want to be richer
  • gregglgreggl Posts: 21,594 Officer
  • FinfinderFinfinder Posts: 9,945 Admiral
    greggl wrote: »
    rich people?

    Yep the major sports you know the 1%ers you and Bernie want to tax out of existence up to 90% to pay for social programs and guarantee perpetual democrat power.
  • gregglgreggl Posts: 21,594 Officer
    Finfinder wrote: »
    Yep the major sports you know the 1%ers you and Bernie want to tax out of existence up to 90% to pay for social programs and guarantee perpetual democrat power.

    the low end of the contracts here are well under 72k/year. this all happens in 'regular people' money ranges as well as high above the norm.

    and in a lot of cases, abuses below are rampant because of the chance for extreme payouts.
  • FinfinderFinfinder Posts: 9,945 Admiral
    greggl wrote: »
    the low end of the contracts here are well under 72k/year. this all happens in 'regular people' money ranges as well as high above the norm.

    and in a lot of cases, abuses below are rampant because of the chance for extreme payouts.

    again why are you changing the subject ...... that's simply not true of the major professional sports leagues
    and its the athlete's total income because they all market themselves now
  • gregglgreggl Posts: 21,594 Officer
    Finfinder wrote: »
    again why are you changing the subject ...... that's simply not true of the major professional sports leagues
    and its the athlete's total income because they all market themselves now

    once a marketability threshold has been reached, that's the case. there are also redistributive aspects via the union contract. ideally, all the boats rise when those working under the contract deliver. that part is negotiated.
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