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What's the latest on Lion Fish?

Baits OutBaits Out Posts: 12,331 AG
Was just watching a couple guys on Shark Tank trying to sell a share
of their business catching and selling these fish as food.

None of the Sharks were willing to invest for various reasons.

As I remember, there are a couple local restaurants with
them on the menu?

Plus have heard of a couple dive clubs that have some sort of reward
for members killing as many of them as possible in a tournament scenario??

A southeast Florida laid back beach bum and volunteer bikini assessor who lives on island time. 

Replies

  • reel stamasreel stamas Posts: 6,153 Admiral
    One of the Local Fish Markets here sells them (when they can get them)... I assume they buy them from Commercial Divers... I have no idea what they cost (or if they're cleaned). I've eaten them & they're as good as any fish I ever tried (right there w/Hogfish/Scamp/BSB, etc), but the cost/pound to acquire & re-sell seems extravagant...
    There should be NO Commercial Fishing for any fish species considered 'Over-fished' , 'Undergoing Overfishing' or Subject to Recreational Seasons, Limits, or Closures... Game Fish Status IS the Answer !!!
  • spydermonkeyspydermonkey Posts: 765 Officer
    I think you were watching a re-run. I believe I saw that episode about 2 years ago. As far as the status right now I have no clue. I heard that if someone can figure out how to trap them that there would be a good commercial market for it.
    "Insert intelligent sounding quote here"
  • GrizGriz Palm Beach Gardens, FloridaPosts: 9,903 Admin
    I think the state is now offering incentives for most caught, largest, etc.in an effort to try and at least control their numbers.
    The early bird may get the worm, but the Second Mouse gets the cheese. SW

    :Griz
  • gandrfabgandrfab Posts: 21,685 AG
    They won't get removed totally, they live in shallow and deep water, all we can hope for is to keep the population down.
  • NBredfishNBredfish Posts: 207 Deckhand
    The labor cost involved in cleaning & low yield makes them too expensive to be a viable product. Good eats though
  • aboveboredabovebored Posts: 1,289 Officer
    Most that are commercially harvested are lobster trap bycatch
  • gandrfabgandrfab Posts: 21,685 AG
    NBredfish wrote: »
    The labor cost involved in cleaning & low yield makes them too expensive to be a viable product. Good eats though

    Need to label/market them as a delicacy and charge for that.
    With the right price and no limits commercials will make then rare in short order.
  • Baits OutBaits Out Posts: 12,331 AG
    I think you were watching a re-run. I believe I saw that episode about 2 years ago. As far as the status right now I have no clue. I heard that if someone can figure out how to trap them that there would be a good commercial market for it.

    That well could be. I have seen many repeats but this one was new to me.
    Repeats are run in two to three hour stretches during the first part of the week.

    In this area the new ones are broadcasted on Friday evenings.

    A southeast Florida laid back beach bum and volunteer bikini assessor who lives on island time. 
  • FletchFletch Merritt Island, FLPosts: 2,461 Moderator
    A local restaurant asked me and a few other guys to bring some in a little over a year ago so they could try them out on the menu. I brought in a little over 300 lbs on my first trip. I would estimate somewhere around 400 fish. I did not have to gut them or trim their fins. He was sold out within a matter of a few days. Since this was the first delivery to that restaurant, the manager and owner did the gutting an finning themselves. And, I pretty much cured them from doing that ever again so now we have to gut and fin (but the price went up).

    Since then, I haven't had much time to devote to them and have only dropped off smaller amounts here and there. A friend has brought in even larger hauls on several occasions. And as always, they sell fast. We've definitely thinned them down in the haunts we routinely dive but they are still out there in good numbers. A sub in Curacao has documented them at depths approaching 1,000 ft. With all the structure we have in the "un-divable" depths, it's a safe assumption that they aren't going anywhere. Localized reduction - yes to a degree. Outside of some lion fish specific disease, elimination is simply not going to happen.
    "Ninety percent I'll spend on good times, women and Irish whiskey. The other ten percent, I'll probably waste..."
    -- Tug McGraw on getting a raise

    Get Down Fishing Charters - Port Canaveral, Florida
  • Baits OutBaits Out Posts: 12,331 AG
    Good reply. Thanks!

    A southeast Florida laid back beach bum and volunteer bikini assessor who lives on island time. 
  • GardawgGardawg Posts: 9,763 Admiral
    Lionfish fillets were $19.99 @ lb. at Key Largo Fisheries yesterday

    They are very delicate fish and go great with a nice sauce such as lemon and caper or a shallot and white wine reduction
    “Today a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively, there is no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves.

    Heres Tom with the Weather.”
  • dragon baitdragon bait Posts: 9,089 Admiral
  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 11,688 AG
    $6/lb whole to the boat last I saw.
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • gandrfabgandrfab Posts: 21,685 AG
    ANUMBER1 wrote: »
    $6/lb whole to the boat last I saw.

    This is the number that counts.I think it should go up.
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