Home Big Bend General Fishing & The Outdoors

What a Shame

2»

Replies

  • VertigoVertigo Yankeetown, FLPosts: 617 Officer
    Tidal range on The Indian River Lagoon System can range from over 4 feet to just a few inches, depending on where you measure it and when.

    The opening and closing of inlets may or may not have any beneficial effect. The change in salinity (and overload of nutrients) as a result of all the fresh water from last summer is probably the cause of the situation today. Opening an inlet may help, but it would be another change in salinity and flow patterns. Flushing a lagoon is a little more complicated than flushing a toilet.
  • BillyBilly ChassahowitzkaPosts: 2,728 Captain
    ANUMBER1 wrote: »
    Last sentence is spot on!

    Dang...you are still are around. I've missed your postings in the Big Bend forum lately.

    Bill
    "And the ocean is howling for the things that might have been..."
  • BuckeyeBuckeye Posts: 4,984 Captain
    Vertigo wrote: »
    Tidal range on The Indian River Lagoon System can range from over 4 feet to just a few inches, depending on where you measure it and when.

    Exactly. Depends on how close you are to the inlet. The closer you are to an inlet the higher the tides. There is no inlet between Ponce and Sebastian, the better part of 100 miles. Of course, smack in the middle - Merritt Island - would have the least "tidal flow", which is contrary to what you stated. There is no "tidal flow" to speak of in parts of the IRL and the primary reason is the lack of inlets.
    Vertigo wrote: »
    The opening and closing of inlets may or may not have any beneficial effect. The change in salinity (and overload of nutrients) as a result of all the fresh water from last summer is probably the cause of the situation today.

    You mean this wet winter (dry season) we just experienced. The rainy season last year would have minimal impact on what is going on now. I don't know about up there, but down here there is a fertilizer ban in place from June to November, the rainy season. So all the winter long you can fertilize the crap, literally, out of your lawns. The problem is this "dry season" has been incredibly wet, so all that fertilizer just washed in to the lagoon.
    harbaugh_slow.gif

    I have never eaten a booger in my entire life. -Jim Harbaugh
  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 10,959 AG
    Billy wrote: »
    Dang...you are still are around. I've missed your postings in the Big Bend forum lately.

    Bill
    I still here, been working hard, fixin to wrap up stone crab.
    Saw y'all fished ozello again, give me a call next time, if I ain't working beer is on me at the Outpost.


    Sorry for the derail guys.
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • majorgatormajorgator Posts: 369 Deckhand
    ANUMBER1 wrote: »
    Sorry for the derail guys.
    This thread was derailed at the very first post :Sinking
  • Luv2YakLuv2Yak Posts: 944 Officer
    What we know about the Indian River Lagoon fish kill

    Q: Why is the lagoon so unhealthy?
    A: The problem has been brewing for years. Decades of pollution from septic tanks, fertilizers, stormwater runoff and other sources, coupled with a "perfect storm" of drought, followed by record cold in 2010, set the stage for harsh algae blooms in 2011.
    A "superbloom" of green algae that year and subsequent brown algae blooms killed some 60 percent of the lagoon's seagrass, the barometer of the estuary's ecological health. Hundreds of manatees, dolphins and pelicans also died in the wake of the blooms.

    Q: Did the large water releases from Lake Okeechobee cause the current bloom?
    A: No. While those water releases cause blooms in the St. Lucie River and the southern Indian River Lagoon, most of that water exits inlets before it reaches Brevard's portion of the lagoon.
    "It's not Lake Okeechobee, that's pretty much certain," said Ed Phlips, professor of algal physiology and ecology at the University of Florida. "Lake Okeechobee discharges more for the St. Lucie (River). That's a whole different ballgame down there."

    Q: What's being done now?
    A: The Legislature has allocated more than $72 million to Brevard County over the past three years, most of it for large-scale muck removal projects. There are two major muck-dredging projects going on right now to remove the nutrient-laden soils that have built up in the lagoon over decades.
    The dredging is intended to remove nitrogen and phosphorus in the muck that fuels harmful algae blooms. The muck also stirs up, clouding the sunlight seagrass needs to grow.
    County officials and the Brevard Zoo have been growing and placing oysters in the lagoon to filter-feed on algae and remove excess nitrogen from the water.

    Q: Why not just open up Canaveral Lock?
    A: It's been tried, and it didn't do much other than causing expensive dredging and repairs.
    When Tropical Storm Fay caused severe flooding along the Banana River Lagoon in August 2008, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers left the lock open and used it as a spillway to drain the lagoon. The lock was opened for at least a week, Corps officials said, which prevented millions of dollars’ worth of flooding damage to properties.
    But when operators tried to close the lock gates after the storm, two sector gate couplings broke, because silt had built up in the gates recesses.
    Recent research by the Florida Institute of Technology showed that simply keeping the lock open wouldn’t do much to improve the lagoon, but there may be other ways to improve the exchange of lagoon and ocean water near the port, or elsewhere. Specifically, small inlets or culverts along the most narrow strips of barrier island, coupled with a pumping station, could provide significant benefits, the FIT study found.
    In simulations, either a narrow tidal inlet or pumping station in the southern Mosquito Lagoon produced complete flushing of the Mosquito Lagoon and the northern Indian River Lagoon within about 70 days or less, the study found. A tidal inlet just north of Patrick Air Force Base also substantially improved flushing of the Banana River. But doubling Sebastian Inlet’s width did not noticeably improve flushing rates or extent.

    Q: What can I do?
    A: Beyond maintaining your septic tanks and reducing fertilizer use, here's just a few of the things what the city of Cocoa Beach suggests:
    •Contact Federal and State representatives urging support for remedial and preventative legislation to clean up the Indian River Lagoon
    •Keep grass clippings or landscape trimmings from falling into the Banana River Lagoon
    •Don't sweep organic and road debris into the storm drainage inlets at the street
    •Monitor private landscape services to ensure they handle grass clippings and landscape trimmings properly
    •Support more stringent regulations than required to prevent organic material from being discharged into the Banana River Lagoon
    •Support funding for more infrastructure projects

    http://www.floridatoday.com/story/news/local/environment/2016/03/23/what-we-know----and-dont-know----fish-kill/82163574/
  • BuckeyeBuckeye Posts: 4,984 Captain
    Luv2Yak wrote: »
    Specifically, small inlets or culverts along the most narrow strips of barrier island, coupled with a pumping station, could provide significant benefits, the FIT study found.
    In simulations, either a narrow tidal inlet or pumping station in the southern Mosquito Lagoon produced complete flushing of the Mosquito Lagoon and the northern Indian River Lagoon within about 70 days or less, the study found. A tidal inlet just north of Patrick Air Force Base also substantially improved flushing of the Banana River. But doubling Sebastian Inlet’s width did not noticeably improve flushing rates or extent.

    :hail
    harbaugh_slow.gif

    I have never eaten a booger in my entire life. -Jim Harbaugh
  • VertigoVertigo Yankeetown, FLPosts: 617 Officer
    Luv2Yak wrote: »
    Q: What can I do?
    A: Beyond maintaining your septic tanks and reducing fertilizer use, here's just a few of the things what the city of Cocoa Beach suggests:
    •Contact Federal and State representatives urging support for remedial and preventative legislation to clean up the Indian River Lagoon
    •Keep grass clippings or landscape trimmings from falling into the Banana River Lagoon
    •Don't sweep organic and road debris into the storm drainage inlets at the street
    •Monitor private landscape services to ensure they handle grass clippings and landscape trimmings properly
    •Support more stringent regulations than required to prevent organic material from being discharged into the Banana River Lagoon
    •Support funding for more infrastructure projects

    They forgot the most effective option: Move back north. :grin
  • GatorCityGatorCity Posts: 311 Deckhand
    We need to build a wall. A really big wall. And you know what? We're gonna make New York and New Jersey pay for it!
  • Luv2YakLuv2Yak Posts: 944 Officer
    GatorCity wrote: »
    We need to build a wall. A really big wall. And you know what? We're gonna make New York and New Jersey pay for it!

    Florida's current Governor Rick Scott was born in Bloomington, IL 12/1/1952. He was raised in North Kansas City, MO. He graduated from North Kansas City High School in 1970. In 1997 he launched Richard L. Scott Investments in Naples, FL.

    Here in Florida I'm afraid it's "way too late" for "a wall".
  • VertigoVertigo Yankeetown, FLPosts: 617 Officer
    I blame air conditioning and DDT for the current problems. 70 years ago Florida summer weather and mosquitoes were enough to keep the population low.
  • Luv2YakLuv2Yak Posts: 944 Officer
    Fish kill in Florida: ‘Heartbreaking images’ seen for miles

    The impact extends beyond the shores of the Indian River Lagoon — comprised of the Mosquito, Banana River and Indian River lagoons — and into the pocketbooks of Floridians, especially those in the state’s two most profitable industries: tourism and fishing.

    “Our oysters are dead, seagrasses are dead,” said Conner, the fisherman. “It (will be) hard to recover. You never fully recover.”

    http://fox13now.com/2016/03/25/fish-kill-in-florida-heartbreaking-images-seen-for-miles/
  • Luv2YakLuv2Yak Posts: 944 Officer
    Northern Indian River Lagoon Fish Kill

    Latest news on ecosystem devastation

    Florida Sportsman is investigating a massive fish kill in the northern Indian and Banana River system.

    According to East Central Field Editor Bill Sargent, multiple species of fish have been observed floating or washing up on shorelines from as far north as Mosquito Lagoon south of Oak Hill, along the Indian and Banana rivers in Brevard County, and as far south on the Indian River as Melbourne and Palm Bay. Sargent, a Melbourne native who has been reporting in this region for 47 years, described the kill as “greater than anything we’ve seen before outside of winter kills."

    http://www.floridasportsman.com/2016/03/24/indian-river-fish-kill/
  • lakemanlakeman Posts: 762 Officer
    Vertigo wrote: »
    I blame air conditioning and DDT for the current problems. 70 years ago Florida summer weather and mosquitoes were enough to keep the population low.

    I have to agree with you for the most part, without AC the population would be much smaller.......
    However it is the Developers, and most all politicians are tied to developers including all of the Water management people. We could do something even with moderate development, but the cost would become very high for new buildings, and the needed technology to create a solution to over used resources especially Water. Our taxes would go up and yes energy cost also, and that may happen anyway some one has to pay for the "modern development"
  • BillyBilly ChassahowitzkaPosts: 2,728 Captain
    If y'all think the people from the north, even though I hate those who come here and want to make it like "back home", are what killed Florida I have a bridge to sell you.

    Greed is what killed our State.

    Bill
    "And the ocean is howling for the things that might have been..."
  • HammerheadTedHammerheadTed Posts: 1,256 Officer
    Unfortunately, this is not unique to Florida. Fresh water quality has been declining for decades all over the country. Coastal areas resisted problems because of the cleaning action of tides, but even tides cannot overcome persistent problems, especially if flow is impeded. Bill is right, as known polluters have continued to destroy the water unchecked for generations. Development, without environmental safeguards, is certainly a lot of the problem, especially before 1991 Land Development Act (not sure I have the right name here) when there were no setback or Impervious surface restrictions and canals, marshes and shorelines could be "modified", etc. This is also the time when septic tanks were commonly installed in waterfront properties. There are some solutions to at least slow things down, such as the sewer projects in Weeki Wachee and Homosassa. Responsible action by the public, such as not using yard fertilizer, maintaining swales to trap runoff and following impervious surface guidelines is unlikely so some rules with penalties need to be brought to bear.
  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 10,959 AG
    everybody just look in the mirror.
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • mdiaczykmdiaczyk Posts: 135 Officer
    I think we have all heard about the lake O water level management. I wrote something for a college course in 2002 about the run off. The ideas that were floating around about what to do about water level management. Sadly look at what has been done.
  • Scott CrownScott Crown Posts: 661 Officer
    I have quite a few good friends that guide the Indian/Mosquito lagoon system. The last thing they need or want are rumors that there are no more fish. This is there livelihood. Yes there was a big fish kill but they are still catching good numbers north of Titusville. Most of the guides there are very passionate about the lagoon system and are doing everything they can to ensure it's future.
Sign In or Register to comment.