Talk me out of it....

So I am thinking of selling my PA 12 in order to downsize to a Revo 11 (hopefully used to save some money as well). I love the PA12 and really enjoy the fact that I can stand and fish. The problem is it is such a ***** to load and unload and I find myself taking much more gear than I really need. I seriously put in an hour in prep and two hours after each trip while caring for the yak and putting everything away. I just think a downsize in kayak and gear will actually do me good as I only fish inshore and mostly target reds and snook up in the bushes. The only thing I will miss will be standing and I will really enjoy less equipment and less of a hassle in loading and unloading (did I mention I cartop the PA)......

I just think the Revo will be easier to handle, faster, and easier to paddle in those situations when I have been in really shallow water on low tides. I spent two hours in Pineland last year pulling my yak through the mud as that was easier than trying to paddle that beast vs. the tide and wind.
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Replies

  • Android77Android77 Posts: 488 Deckhand
    At least get the 13. The shorter the kayak the harder they are to track straight.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  • jakejake Posts: 326 Deckhand
    I posted something almost identical a few months ago, and in the end i decided standing was too important to me to give up for more maneuverability. I still might try the paddleboard thing and see if that will do when i want to stand and then get something sleek for when i want to cover a lot of ground..

    If you do sell the PA...holler at me
  • RickysreefRickysreef Posts: 394 Officer
    I have a PA 14 and would not change it for any other kayak,yes is heavy and all that but wen I'm out there I feel like a king so much space I don't get wet unless is really bad and many other things that I love about the PA,get a revo if u need to go faster!
  • dcrdcr Posts: 362 Deckhand
    I have a Sport. You know how little and lightweight it is. I too spend an hour in prep and almost another hour afterwards. And I fish just across the street. A smaller kayak isn't going to help that. BUT I also have a recently acquired pickup and the loading/unloading now is a snap. I could not, in my wildest imagination, ever be capable of cartopping a PA.
  • crackedconchcrackedconch Posts: 380 Deckhand
    I agree with the fact that a smaller kayak will not force you to carry less stuff. If you're happy with the PA12, stay with it. Look into the possibility of a trailer. They make small hitches for cars and then you wouldn't have to worry about picking it up the yak to put it on top of the car. You could even find a small jon boat trailer and "convert it".

    Just my .02
    Mike
    Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things!!

    Pioneer 197 Sportfish
    Suzuki DF150
  • inshore daveinshore dave Posts: 556 Officer
    I have a PA14. Most of my fishing is bass fishing, flats fishing and I'm just now getting equipped to go offshore. I go through all of the same things you do (prep time, all the gear I bring and the longer clean up time).

    I wouldn't change my kayak for any other yak made.............PERIOD!!

    JMHO.
    2014 Hobie PA14-Dune
  • jcanracerjcanracer Posts: 4,341 Moderator
    Sorry I took so long to respond. I have been lucky to own most of the non-pro-angler Hobie kayaks: Sport -> Revo11 -> Outback -> Revo13. Everyone is different, so I'm not saying that the Revolution 13 I use now is "The Perfect Kayak". If you have the patience, here's my experience...

    The Sport was awesome for someone who isn't too heavy and is limited in storage space. I kept mine in a public storage locker while I lived in apartments. It was stable and nimble, but the lack of length meant it wasn't very efficient at cutting through the water. The 225lb limit was also a problem for me, since I weighed about 205lbs at the time and starting to take more gear.

    Sold the Sport for a Revolution 11. That was an eye opener. The revolution is slim and a bit tippy in comparison to the Sport (or the Outback, but more on that soon). I actually rolled it first time offshore, never did that in my sport. Since then I got used to it and love it so much, I kept it. The portability is great, I car top that kayak with no problems, and I have lower back issues! This kayak flies through the water (with turbo fins) whether its flat calm inshore water or offshore. I still use this kayak when I am doing short seatrout trips in Biscayne Bay. I only carry 2 rods, a net, a catch-bag and I use the middle round hatch for tackle. Basically, if my tackle cant fit in the hobie gear bucket, it gets left at home!

    For a larger kayak, I went with the Outback (pre-2015 update). I loved the stability, the amount of space, the 4 molded in rod holders, this thing is a fishing machine compared to my Revo11! What I didn't like was the weight and the mismatched handles (one side had a rigid handle, the other had a flex handle) which made it difficult to lift and balance overhead to get onto my roof racks. I didnt love the hull slap from the shape of the bow when hitting waves offshore, but in hindsight this wasn't a big deal. Then Hobie came out with the new seats shortly afterwards and I had a little less love for my Outback.

    Sold the Outback and went to Revolution 13 which I still own and enjoy today. It had everything I loved in the Revo11, but a bit more space and of course the new seat. I had to dial back some of my gear from the Outback-days, but I still manage to take 4 rods, a gaff, a catch-bag, fish finder, and a 5 gallon bucket for live bait. Also, this one is still manageable to lift solo and balance overhead to put on roof racks.

    Sorry for the long winded response, now comes the short part: If you ever want to stand and fish again, forget getting a revolution. Yes you can buy amas, but your point is to simplify things, not add parts! Next, DCR, CrackedConch, and Inshore Dave are 100% correct that buying a smaller kayak will not make loading/unloading all your gear magically easier. What will happen instead is you will get frustrated by the "lack of storage space" on your new kayak.

    I tell you what though. If you would like to take me to some good fishing spots in Naples or Marco Island, I would be willing to bring both of my revos so you can try one and we can switch during the trip so you can experience both.
    Hobie Kayak angler for life!
  • quatinquatin Posts: 598 Officer
    Standing up is a pretty big advantage inshore. I would go with an Outback and not the Revo.
  • LurchyLurchy Posts: 406 Deckhand
    The answer is a Bote Rackham paddleboard. stand up and fish, pole or paddle.. Cooler to sit down on. 40 lbs to lift on top of your car or in pickup.. It's that simple
  • pjstevkopjstevko Posts: 513 Officer
    i used to stand in my Jackson Cuda 12 all the time. I even stood and fly fished out of it
  • BasstarBasstar Posts: 517 Officer
    jcanracer wrote: »
    Sorry I took so long to respond. I have been lucky to own most of the non-pro-angler Hobie kayaks: Sport -> Revo11 -> Outback -> Revo13. Everyone is different, so I'm not saying that the Revolution 13 I use now is "The Perfect Kayak". If you have the patience, here's my experience...

    The Sport was awesome for someone who isn't too heavy and is limited in storage space. I kept mine in a public storage locker while I lived in apartments. It was stable and nimble, but the lack of length meant it wasn't very efficient at cutting through the water. The 225lb limit was also a problem for me, since I weighed about 205lbs at the time and starting to take more gear.

    Sold the Sport for a Revolution 11. That was an eye opener. The revolution is slim and a bit tippy in comparison to the Sport (or the Outback, but more on that soon). I actually rolled it first time offshore, never did that in my sport. Since then I got used to it and love it so much, I kept it. The portability is great, I car top that kayak with no problems, and I have lower back issues! This kayak flies through the water (with turbo fins) whether its flat calm inshore water or offshore. I still use this kayak when I am doing short seatrout trips in Biscayne Bay. I only carry 2 rods, a net, a catch-bag and I use the middle round hatch for tackle. Basically, if my tackle cant fit in the hobie gear bucket, it gets left at home!

    For a larger kayak, I went with the Outback (pre-2015 update). I loved the stability, the amount of space, the 4 molded in rod holders, this thing is a fishing machine compared to my Revo11! What I didn't like was the weight and the mismatched handles (one side had a rigid handle, the other had a flex handle) which made it difficult to lift and balance overhead to get onto my roof racks. I didnt love the hull slap from the shape of the bow when hitting waves offshore, but in hindsight this wasn't a big deal. Then Hobie came out with the new seats shortly afterwards and I had a little less love for my Outback.

    Sold the Outback and went to Revolution 13 which I still own and enjoy today. It had everything I loved in the Revo11, but a bit more space and of course the new seat. I had to dial back some of my gear from the Outback-days, but I still manage to take 4 rods, a gaff, a catch-bag, fish finder, and a 5 gallon bucket for live bait. Also, this one is still manageable to lift solo and balance overhead to put on roof racks.

    Sorry for the long winded response, now comes the short part: If you ever want to stand and fish again, forget getting a revolution. Yes you can buy amas, but your point is to simplify things, not add parts! Next, DCR, CrackedConch, and Inshore Dave are 100% correct that buying a smaller kayak will not make loading/unloading all your gear magically easier. What will happen instead is you will get frustrated by the "lack of storage space" on your new kayak.

    I tell you what though. If you would like to take me to some good fishing spots in Naples or Marco Island, I would be willing to bring both of my revos so you can try one and we can switch during the trip so you can experience both.

    I am looking at both the new Outback and the Revolution 13. How much stability does one give up by selecting the Revolution and how much speed and Maneuverability does one gain with the Revolution?

    Secondly how well does the Mirage Drive and its components hold up to saltwater use?

    Thanks
  • jcanracerjcanracer Posts: 4,341 Moderator
    Basstar wrote: »
    I am looking at both the new Outback and the Revolution 13. How much stability does one give up by selecting the Revolution and how much speed and Maneuverability does one gain with the Revolution?

    Secondly how well does the Mirage Drive and its components hold up to saltwater use?

    Thanks

    Stability: Outback wins. They made it even easier to stand in the 2015+ Outbacks because the flattened the deck a bit.
    Speed: Revolution wins, but not by much! With turbo fins and a light load, the Outback cruises at about the same speed as the Revolution. You only feel the difference over distance, or if sprinting.

    Saltwater: Saltwater corrodes everything over time, ask any old salt, but since you know that then there's no excuse for not maintaining your gear. I rinse my kayaks with freshwater when I get home and I spray wd-40 on the mirage drive chains and cables afterwards. Without that attention to detail, the exposed portion of the mirage cables can show rust after only a few trips.
    Hobie Kayak angler for life!
  • kayakerinkeywestkayakerinkeywest Posts: 538 Officer
    Jeez, one hour before and two hours after? I think there are pills you can take to reduce that time. My kayak gets rinsed when it rains (their plastic). The only thing that gets washed down is the reels, but I am going to stop doing that as I am still having to break them down every month. The non-loading time stuff is strictly your inexperience (or logistic issues, maybe you have to carry stuff a 100 yards to where you are parked) or personal issues as you already understand you take too much stuff but continue to do so. The loading stuff is the biggest issue that I take to heart. At any point where your decision to go fishing is negated due to the fact of not wanting to deal with the hassle of loading/unloading your kayak, then outside of getting a trailer etc., trade that dude in and get something lighter/easier. Whatever gets you on the water and happy is the way to go. kayak fishing is a slippery slope. So many people are out of the game because of the hassle factor. It doesn't take much and we will see that kayak and your gear on the "advertised" section. I hate seeing those. Kayak fishing rules.
    Youtube - KEY WEST KAYAK FISHING https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkGY6yxE8kogYHKXisMhA2w
    All About The Bait Store - http://www.allaboutthebait.com/
  • BarrellBarrell Posts: 1,192 Officer
    Not true with Hobies. The revo 11 tracks perfectly. How much do you wheigh? I sell a lot of revo 11's. They are the second best seller now next to the outback. However I never sell a revo 11 to anyone over 200 pounds. If your over 200 consider the revo 13 or the Outback.
    Android77 wrote: »
    At least get the 13. The shorter the kayak the harder they are to track straight.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  • BarrellBarrell Posts: 1,192 Officer
    Until the wind and tide pickup. If you have never been on a Hobie they can overpower any forces of nature. I only play around with my dragonfly when there is no wind or current.
    Lurchy wrote: »
    The answer is a Bote Rackham paddleboard. stand up and fish, pole or paddle.. Cooler to sit down on. 40 lbs to lift on top of your car or in pickup.. It's that simple
  • LurchyLurchy Posts: 406 Deckhand
    Barrell wrote: »
    Until the wind and tide pickup. If you have never been on a Hobie they can overpower any forces of nature. I only play around with my dragonfly when there is no wind or current.

    Very true.. I didn't mention you need very ideal conditions to use it right.
  • IndianoutlawIndianoutlaw Posts: 550 Officer
    Thanks for all the replies guys, I have decided to keep it for now as I found out in the last 24 hours taht I will unexpectedly be buying a new car..:banghead I really like the idea of the paddleboard, but those Bote's are so expensive.

    Jeez, one hour before and two hours after? I think there are pills you can take to reduce that time. My kayak gets rinsed when it rains (their plastic). The only thing that gets washed down is the reels, but I am going to stop doing that as I am still having to break them down every month. The non-loading time stuff is strictly your inexperience (or logistic issues, maybe you have to carry stuff a 100 yards to where you are parked) or personal issues as you already understand you take too much stuff but continue to do so.

    The time is just a component of me being very detailed in what I do. I take the saddles and showboat off each trip and really wash down all tackle and the yak after each trip. I spent too much money on a new PA to just wash it off and not take great care of it. I also garage store everything so not only do I wash it, I hand dry it, put it on a lift, and stow everything neat and out of sight. That's just who I am. Wonder if I could find somebody to trade the PA with straight up with for one of those Rackhams....
    P1000022_2.jpg
  • jakejake Posts: 326 Deckhand

    The time is just a component of me being very detailed in what I do. I take the saddles and showboat off each trip and really wash down all tackle and the yak after each trip. I spent too much money on a new PA to just wash it off and not take great care of it. I also garage store everything so not only do I wash it, I hand dry it....

    I get being meticulous, I'm kind of anal myself, but they are just big hunks of plastic. Fresh water wash down and let it dry in the sun and you could save hours off your routine. Give it a soaping every 3rd or 5th time if you really want to but as long as you hit the metal parts with water pretty good - you're going to be fine! Definitely spend the time on the reels and tackle, but the rest is a waste IMO
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