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Deer jerky

I'm making my first attempt at deer jerky! I sliced up about 4 pounds of doe ham, used the appropriate amount of Hi mountain teriyaki, got it on the smoker at 160* with some maple chips. I'm not sure how long it will go, some searches said about 8-9 hours.
We will see how it turns out!
Any tips or different techniques are appreciated!
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Replies

  • Panhandler80Panhandler80 Posts: 8,851 Moderator
    Great idea. It's been a while since I've done it. Thanks.

    I have four do hams in freezer right now. They are all off yearlings. I like rubbing them and baking whole bone-in. Don't want to waste all on jerky, but I think one is called for! This is going to happen.

    The good thing about frozen ones too is once partially thawed they are really easy to slice thin.
    "Whatcha doin' in my waters?"
  • bluewatermafiabluewatermafia Posts: 540 Officer
    Just pulled a test piece of the bottom rack, the teriyaki is a little weak, I may have underestimated the amount of meat I had, but it's coming along nicely. I'll make sure it has a good amount of smoke to it to make sure it has some flavor.
  • RexLanRexLan Posts: 868 Officer
    Just pulled a test piece of the bottom rack, the teriyaki is a little weak, I may have underestimated the amount of meat I had, but it's coming along nicely. I'll make sure it has a good amount of smoke to it to make sure it has some flavor.

    Careful with the smoke ... it will put a bitter taste in it. No more than 2 hours tops. If you're using the built in tube I would give it only a couple of shots.

    If you think they need some flavor get a small brush and put some soy in a bowl and give them a brush ... The other side too when you flip them. Can also add a bit of garlic power to the soy.

    You using a masterbuilt smoker and the temps will be all over the place. They are terribly inaccurate .. I have two of them!

    I would put an oven thermometer in the middle shelf and run it at 145°. 160° is too hot IMH

    NO WATER PAN

    ROTATE the racks front to back and up down at least once.

    I never use the smoker for jerky and have a dozen recipes. I wet brine/marinade mine with cure then dehydrate at 145° until it is done ~ 6-8 hrs. I also have a big slicer and cut mine cross grain about 3/16" thick. Too thin and they don't seem to have the right chew.
    Port Charlotte, Florida
  • bluewatermafiabluewatermafia Posts: 540 Officer
    RexLan wrote: »
    Careful with the smoke ... it will put a bitter taste in it. No more than 2 hours tops. If you're using the built in tube I would give it only a couple of shots.

    If you think they need some flavor get a small brush and put some soy in a bowl and give them a brush ... The other side too when you flip them. Can also add a bit of garlic power to the soy.

    You using a masterbuilt smoker and the temps will be all over the place. They are terribly inaccurate .. I have two of them!

    I would put an oven thermometer in the middle shelf and run it at 145°. 160° is too hot IMH

    NO WATER PAN

    ROTATE the racks front to back and up down at least once.

    I never use the smoker for jerky and have a dozen recipes. I wet brine/marinade mine with cure then dehydrate at 145° until it is done ~ 6-8 hrs. I also have a big slicer and cut mine cross grain about 3/16" thick. Too thin and they don't seem to have the right chew.

    Thanks for the insight Rex!
    I'm not using the water pan. And I'm only using one cup of chips, I'll toss em when they give up the goody and I figure that will be enough.
    Rotating the racks is a good idea, I'll do that.
    We just got this smoker for my dad, havnt used it much yet. I'll put a good thermometer in it and keep an eye on it, thanks for the heads up.
  • Panhandler80Panhandler80 Posts: 8,851 Moderator
    Just pulled a test piece of the bottom rack, the teriyaki is a little weak, I may have underestimated the amount of meat I had, but it's coming along nicely. I'll make sure it has a good amount of smoke to it to make sure it has some flavor.

    Have not even read Rex post yet. I'm sure its spot on.

    Everytime I do it I'm over seasoned. Keep in mind knife / grain relationship. Will have a lot do with marinade absorption.
    "Whatcha doin' in my waters?"
  • bluewatermafiabluewatermafia Posts: 540 Officer
    Have not even read Rex post yet. I'm sure its spot on.

    Everytime I do it I'm over seasoned. Keep in mind knife / grain relationship. Will have a lot do with marinade absorption.

    I was very careful to cut across the grain. I only let he cure sit overnight. The directions said 24 hours, that might affect it, but it was a dry rub, not a wet marinade so I don't think sit time would matter that much.
  • RexLanRexLan Posts: 868 Officer
    Attachment not found.
    I was very careful to cut across the grain. I only let he cure sit overnight. The directions said 24 hours, that might affect it, but it was a dry rub, not a wet marinade so I don't think sit time would matter that much.

    Yes it will. The rub (salt) draws the moisture out and changes the cell structure so the seasonings are absorbed. I like the wet marinade ... bullet proof and I need help sometimes!

    Also, your seasoning may have it, but any time you are going at a very low temperature for more than 2-3 hours you MUST use a cure. General rule is the meat has to reach 140° in 4 hours or else. You will never know until you are very, very sick. Down at these low temps the cure is a must have and another reason I use a wet brine marinade.

    Enjoy

    Here is another great use for some of that deer meat ... yum, yum. I'm sure you don't have the eq. and especially these small casings. You can roll the meat like a noodle and lay it in plastic wrap. The roll it up and twist the ends tight. It will set real nice. Let it rest overnight and then unwrap and finish them off. A pocket full of these on the trail and it is all you need for a great snack.

    Bambi Black Smokey Stix.pdf
    Port Charlotte, Florida
  • Panhandler80Panhandler80 Posts: 8,851 Moderator
    OP... how did you incorporate teriyaki into a "dry rub"?

    Rex.... I've never used a cure on jerky. I have used sodium nitrate on cold smoke sausage. I've mixed it (I think it's ussally like one teaspoon / 5 lbs, or something) in meat before stuffing. If you wanted to do low-temp jerky making (I'm not sure why anybody would), how do you go about evenly distributing cure? Especially if it's a dry rub like OP mentioned.
    "Whatcha doin' in my waters?"
  • RexLanRexLan Posts: 868 Officer
    Good question. The cure is basically salt as you know so it would be quite difficult to evenly distribute it. You can use tender quick which yields a teriffic flavor but it would be to much salt if using a packaged mix already.

    I mix the cure with liquid for normal sausage and I guess you could do the same with a dry mix to make a paste so to speak if you did not want to buy the powder. Or you can use the Mortar Pestle and powder it and mix it in. I use that tool a lot to crush the seeds.

    Correct 1 tsp/5# and more is NOT better.

    My theory on the finishing is I do not want to "cook" the meat. I want to dehydrate it. Meat will start cooking above 145° or so and the fat will also start to render. I like the dehydrator for the job and it works great ... cheap 4 tray unit at WalMart for $30.

    Most liquid spices are available as dehydrated powers. I use some in my rubs. For example the Teriyaki
    http://www.amazon.com/Kikkoman-Teriyaki-Sauce-1-5-Ounce-Packages/dp/B0016HJUUW

    I buy my spices in bulk from a couple of places

    San Francisco Herb ... 1/10th the store price and excellent quality
    http://www.sfherb.com/store/spices-culinary-herbs,category.asp

    Con Yeagar - excellent company with very good product. If you call the order in you will get it for a lot less $$ and pay shipping. The Internet price is marked up 30% for the shipping simplicity.
    http://www.conyeagerspice.com/

    My Spice Sage - a lot of special products - not cheap
    http://www.myspicesage.com/spices-seasonings-herbs.html
    Port Charlotte, Florida
  • bluewatermafiabluewatermafia Posts: 540 Officer
    I say dry rub but it's just the hi mountain teriyaki jerky mix. It is a powder. It already has the cure in it.
    I see what your saying about the salt and cell structure and osmosis, I understand all that, but at the end of the day you are applying seasoning to a relatively small piece of meat, it doesn't have to soak in, it just has to be there. It will be left behind on the meat as the moisture evaporates in the dehydrating process.

    I'm on tapa talk and can't see the pic you posted but from context clues I think your talking about snack sticks, like slim jims. I make my own sausage and could probably do those, I just have had trouble with the artificial casings in the past, the cellulose or collagen or whatever they are made of.
  • BarrellBarrell Posts: 1,305 Officer
    I don't feel making jerky is a waste of good deer meat. In fact when I butcher my deer I strip 80 % of it up at the time of butchering and freeze the strips in bags specifically for jerky. I never throw out any meat at thee end of thee year because its all gone. Two rules Ill never break is always soak in a brine/sugar solution. Ill add a lot of garlic and soy sauce to that solution but you must have salt and sugar.
    Also I always use hickory wood. All the other wood Ive tested including mesquite just does not produce a good jerky.
  • SalteyDogSalteyDog Posts: 65 Deckhand
    Marinade the deer slices in Italian dressing , vinegar and oil. Cook in the oven lowest setting till done.
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