Conventional reel servicing, level of difficulty?

I've got a Daiwa Saltist lever drag that I have been using for about 2 years now, and its never been serviced. I do the usual freshwater rinse-down after each outing (plus a little wd-40 on a rag to wipe off surface) and its never been submerged in saltwater. Its still performing well but I do not want to wait until it has failed before I give it a proper maintenance.

I've serviced my spinning reels before (Shimano Stradic ci4 & Penn SSV), but how much harder is a conventional reel like this?
The multitude of small parts in the technical diagram is intimidating:
http://www.daiwa.com/Documents/PartsDiagram/STTLD35H-LD35HSH.pdf

Should I attempt this myself, or sent it out?
Or
Since "it ain't broke, don't fix it"?
Hobie Kayak angler for life!

Replies

  • XafXaf Posts: 992 Officer
    If you are mechanically inclined, I would do it myself. Usually they are not that hard to service and you know that it has been done right. Go to alantani.com , it has tutorials for servicing most reels plus a forum where a lot of questions can be answered. In the long run it is cheaper and your reel is not likely to fail at just the wrong time.
  • jcanracerjcanracer Posts: 4,271 Moderator
    Xaf wrote: »
    If you are mechanically inclined, I would do it myself. Usually they are not that hard to service and you know that it has been done right. Go to alantani.com , it has tutorials for servicing most reels plus a forum where a lot of questions can be answered. In the long run it is cheaper and your reel is not likely to fail at just the wrong time.

    good suggestion!
    I found a video tutorial there: http://alantani.com/index.php?topic=1701.0
    Hobie Kayak angler for life!
  • johnDjohnD WC FLPosts: 6,389 Admiral
    If you thought a spinner was tough ,I'd leave it alone..best to drop it off somewhere and have them do it. most shops around here charge $25 or $30 for a conventional, clean and re-lube.
  • jcanracerjcanracer Posts: 4,271 Moderator
    Actually, I enjoyed the insight gained by servicing my spinning reels. Not to mention that once I did the first reel, the fear factor was gone.
    With the damned weather being so uncooperative, it looks like I will have plenty of time this weekend to take it slow and open up the Saltist.
    Hobie Kayak angler for life!
  • johnDjohnD WC FLPosts: 6,389 Admiral
    Just keep everything lined up..Daiwa schematics online are not high quality like shimano's..
  • territunaterrituna Posts: 57 Greenhorn
    Ke's in casselberry does a nice job and this is their slow time which means your reel is done quickly.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 Officer
    That should be Kel's in Casselberry.
    territuna wrote: »
    Ke's in casselberry does a nice job and this is their slow time which means your reel is done quickly.

    You can do a lot of good w/o dismantling every single part. Use screw driver that's an excellent fit, don't want to mess up screwhead or break off seized screw w/excess force.

    Should be fairly EZ & not too intimidating just to open it up & inspect internals. Hopefully saltwater & sand hasn't penetrated, leaving the gears in clean grease w/o any nasty corrosion inside. Just redistributing grease & oiling all other moving parts can do a world of good on a 2 YO low mileage reel.

    If it's wet inside & green w/corrosion, might want to close it back up & leave it to experts.
  • fish_stixfish_stix Posts: 1,271 Officer
    As stated above go to www.alantani.com for detailed instructions. Most reels are very easy!
  • rookiemistakerookiemistake Posts: 1,145 Officer
    Piece of cake! I did my saltist and saltiga. Changed the drags out on both to carbontex. Just take them off and lay out the pieces in order they came off. Put down a towel or something so they dont bounce around when you drop a part
  • XafXaf Posts: 992 Officer
    Just be aware that there can be tiny parts that tend to come out sometimes without you seeing where they came from. Like the spring under the star drag in an some reels.
  • Alex from GAAlex from GA Posts: 1,221 Officer
    Your best friend can be your camera or phone. Take a lot of pictures and if you need to refer to them it's really worth it.
  • jcanracerjcanracer Posts: 4,271 Moderator
    So I never got around to this until now, and I made a rookie mistake: I stripped the head off one of the screws that holds the body together. Part number G47-3704.
    On the positive side, that friggin screw is not coming out, so I could respool and go fish with this reel as soon as needed. On the negative side, I can't open it to actually service this reel, so I would have to continue relying on luck and surface applied lubricants.

    I hate to give up on this, so I'm going to order the replacement when I get a chance and drill out the old screw (no other way to remove the chitty brass screw that is in there).
    :banghead
    Hobie Kayak angler for life!
  • XafXaf Posts: 992 Officer
    Make sure you put some grease on the screws when you do get it apart. I always grease the screws on any new reel I get. Saves a lot of anguish later so they aren't frozen up when taking the reel apart to service it.
  • jcanracerjcanracer Posts: 4,271 Moderator
    yeah, it makes me wish I had taken the reel apart a year ago to save myself from the current situation. You live and you learn...
    Hobie Kayak angler for life!
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 Officer
    Would recommend that you do not try to "drill out the old screw" yourself. Compared to simple servicing - this task represents an entirely different "level of difficulty" - where a mistake can be unforgiving.
    jcanracer wrote: »
    drill out the old screw (no other way to remove the chitty brass screw that is in there)

    IF the only thing wrong is that you "stripped the head off one of the screws" there very well may be another way you aren't aware of to salvage the reel.
  • jcanracerjcanracer Posts: 4,271 Moderator
    Indeed, I plan to seek help on this. I have removed screws with stripped heads before but never on such a small/delicate scale as this.
    The reel is actually in working order, I only ever wanted to get it open to clean and replace the grease. I'm embarrassed that this one sh|tty screw has made me look like I am incapable of servicing my reel.
    Hobie Kayak angler for life!
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 Officer
    It's pretty common to find old reels that have screws with stripped heads, or broken off screws. No reason to be embarrassed, many of these screws are tiny & made of soft brass. Stronger SS screws are also prone to seizing.

    Have a Micro Oxy-Acetylene torch & dental drills to salvage/restore reels with broken off screws. Even with these specialized tools it can be a challenge to preserve the tiny threads cut into magnesium aluminum castings.

    Xaf's advice is worth repeating. New reels are commonly assembled with dry screws making them vulnerable to salt intrusion. Removing the screws on new reels, one by one, before they're exposed to saltwater, just to lube the threads - so they'll repel saltwater, can "save a lot of anguish later".
  • jcanracerjcanracer Posts: 4,271 Moderator
    I took the reel into an authorized Daiwa dealer for them to replace the rounded out screw and do a clean and lube. $21. I think that is fair & affordable and it makes me less inclined to attempt to service it myself next time.
    Hobie Kayak angler for life!
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 Officer
    Have seen broken Daiwa screws seized exclusively inside side plates - where the threads in the frame weren't even stuck!

    There's an unfortunate combination of soft brass screws & over tightening to the point of degrading the screw's strength. Sometimes the screw heads can then break with little pressure applied to them.

    Old Swedish friend recently gave me his Dad's pre-ABU level wind found in attic of their cottage near Norway. Mostly corrosion green, w/crank & knobs stuck. Will never be pretty, but now it glides again.
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