Home Sportsman's Kitchen

The new Boston Butt . . .

Went to W/D this afternoon to accidentally discover they had them on sale for $1.99/pound. None were left in the case so talked with the butcher I know and he brought out a great fresh 10-pounder.

Now gonna wrap that big boy in the rub and keep in the fridge for the next few days.

Lots of people in this community will be drooling when the smoker gets up to speed.

:wink

A southeast Florida laid back beach bum and volunteer bikini assessor who lives on island time. 

Replies

  • hatcityhatcity Stuart,FLPosts: 3,382 Captain
    Sounds like a plan for next weekend here
    Cole slaw and cornbread
    I was not born stupid, just had lots of practice
  • Baits OutBaits Out Posts: 12,331 AG
    hatcity wrote: »
    Sounds like a plan for next weekend here
    Cole slaw and cornbread


    I HEAR THAT!

    But, not into crumbly breads and much prefer --
    POLENTA


    3 C water
    1 C stone-ground yellow corn meal
    1 t salt


    Mix in corn meal with 1 cup cold water.

    Boil the remaining two cups of water.

    Pour the corn meal/cold water mix into the pot of boiling water. This helps to prevent lumping.

    Reduce temperature and stir with a wooden spoon until it firms up and is easily separated from the edges of the pot. If using a cast iron or other non-Teflon pot and some of the meal sticks and slightly burns to the edges, that is part of the ritual and can be removed by soaking in water later.

    Flip over onto a wooden cutting board.

    Allow to sit for awhile then cut into slices with a taunt string.


    Stone-ground note:


    Regular cornmeal is ground between metal rollers and the hull and germ are removed so the texture is finer. It also may be enriched to return nutrients that are lost.

    Stone-ground is ground between two stones, obviously. The hull and germ of the corn kernel are usually left in, so the texture is coarser and the meal usually has a more noticeable "corn" flavor. It also is more perishable, so it should be stored in the refrigerator or freezer to keep it from getting rancid.

    Some of the best I have ever had is from Mingus Mill just north of Cherokee, NC. The best of luck is if you happen to get there when it has just come off the stones and the bags are still warm. Run back to your kitchen or campground and make the absolute best cornbread or polenta you will ever have tasted.

    A southeast Florida laid back beach bum and volunteer bikini assessor who lives on island time. 
  • fathomfathom Posts: 315 Officer
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