Who Has Gone From Owning A Boat To NMZ Cold Turkey?

I have owned boats now for 40 years an still own one but am seriously considering going totally NMZ.

FWIW, everything about NOT owning a boat is very appealing from a financial and hassle standpoint but I am a bit insecure to turn loose of a boat totally and instead, have a couple of kayaks to replace it.

Anyone here done this and if so, how has the transition been?

Am I really going to miss the boat by being able to cover more water or is this more just my insecurity of making the change that is making me have the cautious feelings?

Replies

  • RollinRollin Posts: 1,543 Captain
    Once I started with Kayaks my power boats just sat. I lost interest in them and eventually sold them. Once in awhile I'll see a fast boat shooting across the bay and I start twitching a little, but not enough to to start calling Skip Lyson.
  • BasstarBasstar Posts: 517 Officer
    Rollin, this is what I am hoping will be the case. Actually, I am using my boat less and less anyway so another kayak or so may be the death knell which if it is the case, doesn't bother me at all.
  • SwampratSwamprat Posts: 1,058 Officer
    Basstar, you will quickly love not having to worry about maintenance or if there is very minimal. No trailer or vessel fees, no fuel for the boat, no hassles at a ramp.

    You can launch in more varied locations as well as places where a power boat can't, fish from super shallow to deep, more relaxing at least for me. You cover areas more thoroughly. You can tether the yak to you and wade fish or stake out or anchor in promising areas.

    Downside is you can't bring the kitchen sink but if you pack wisely and efficient you will have all you need for a day on the water.

    If I get the urge to motor around I just tag along with my BIL on his bay boat.

    I will be 49 in less than a month and just bought my first yak. I had fished out of them before and was deciding skiff or kayak. For my type of fishing (salt flats and isolated freshwater ponds or creeks with no ramps) a kayak suited that style better.
    Jackson Cuda 12

    A wade fisherman is the most simplistic but the most adept for the quarry they are after. They are immersed in their challenger's habitat and are in tune with the subtle changes of current, temperature and bottom. In order to be successful at this noble and primal fishing form one must be submerged from their goobs to their boobs, anyone doing this outside of that boundary is either sunbathing or swimming. S.F. Stewart 2015
  • BasstarBasstar Posts: 517 Officer
    Thanks so much. I am making trips to Florida more and more and just began wade fishing a few seasons ago but am now missing the ability to be a bit more mobile and cover some different areas. To be honest, I had even considered buying a boat to use in Florida as well as home in freshwater but am really loving my current kayak and the simplicity it offers. Right now, I am seriously considering foregoing the boat purchase and instead, buying a Hobie Mirage kayak to use for my open water situations and keep my tarpon 120 for more creeks and extremely shallow backwater use.

    After owning boats though for so many years, I was concerned that I might regret not having one here but these comments are certainly giving me more confidence that I won't.

    Obviously, I will not miss the expense of purchase, licensing and insurance costs, maintenance costs, fuel costs, trailer parking hassles, etc., that come with boat ownership.

    Thanks so much and have a terrific weekend.
  • SwampThing07SwampThing07 Posts: 350 Deckhand
    I've made the switch a few times from boats to kayaks and currently on kayak and love it. Have friends with boats for whenever I want to go with motor and let them deal with the maintenance and upkeep
  • FloridaODFloridaOD Posts: 3,387 Captain
    I am in the boat business;"Yacht Broker",am around all sorts of vessels, trial runs,deliveries.

    When it comes to my personal boating inclination,I don't even use my 15' outboard anymore.

    Wilderness Ride is plenty.Being an avid lover of smaller water bodies probably a factor, and the big open waters have their appeal too.
    Hunters are present yet relatively uncommon in Florida :wink
  • ButtersButters Posts: 70 Deckhand
    Basstar wrote: »
    I have owned boats now for 40 years an still own one but am seriously considering going totally NMZ.

    FWIW, everything about NOT owning a boat is very appealing from a financial and hassle standpoint but I am a bit insecure to turn loose of a boat totally and instead, have a couple of kayaks to replace it.

    Anyone here done this and if so, how has the transition been?

    Am I really going to miss the boat by being able to cover more water or is this more just my insecurity of making the change that is making me have the cautious feelings?


    Yes I did, I sold my third boat back in November It was a Sea-Pro 24. After I started kayaking, I found myself spending more time on the kayak than on the boat, so I wasn't using it at all. Sold it, and got me a Hobie PA 14 with all the goodies. I don't regret it at all. Best part is that I can store the kayak in less space, the yak cleans in a few minutes and no yearly motor/trailer maintenance.
    logo.png
    www.SouthFloridaKayakFishing.com
    2015 Hobie PA 14
    2014 Malibu Stealth 14
  • BasstarBasstar Posts: 517 Officer
    Thanks so much for the responses and this is very encouraging to me that my gut instincts to "Kayak Only" during my Florida visits are seemingly right on.
  • FloridaODFloridaOD Posts: 3,387 Captain
    Basstar wrote: »
    Thanks so much for the responses and this is very encouraging to me that my gut instincts to "Kayak Only" during my Florida visits are seemingly right on.

    In fact,Kayak may make more Florida available than big boat
    Hunters are present yet relatively uncommon in Florida :wink
  • Pescatoral PursuitPescatoral Pursuit Posts: 5,065 Admiral
    I went from a boat, to a kayak. Put a sail on the kayak to save some peddling back from the NMZ, fell in love with sailing so much I sold the yak and now I have a small sailboat. Kind of overshot my goal.
    cuda-title2_zpsb81e4f1d.jpg
    greggl wrote: »
    Strive for self-sacrificial levels of empathy and sympathy. We are only set free by becoming the scapegoat, or sin eater', rather than picking a target and 'throwing stones.'
    nuevowavo wrote:
    Think you're pretty clever? Think again. Time for a break.
    :rotflmao
  • crackedconchcrackedconch Posts: 380 Deckhand
    I've had fishing boats, sail boats and now kayaks. I gotta say that I love them all and If I had it my way, I'd have one of each! Since that's not possible, I do find I use the yak more than I did my last boat. Now, I'm kicking around the idea of a pontoon boat. It'll actually fulfill several wants. I can go out for a sunset cruise, go island hopping/camping, go offshore (weather permitting), go scalloping in Homosassa and transport the yaks to places that are too far to paddle.

    Mike
    Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things!!

    Pioneer 197 Sportfish
    Suzuki DF150
  • jawrayjawray Posts: 303 Deckhand
    I still have both and I've been thinking of selling the boat. When something breaks on the boat I always ask myself, why do I still have this thing? I could live with just kayaks.
  • summer dazesummer daze Posts: 883 Officer
    I have both and honestly couldn't imagine my life without either. I fish the yak ( PA 12 ) only inshore and take the boat offshore & inshore. My dog loves being on the water with me and I obviously can't put him on the yak, and my girlfriend comes fishing sometimes and we are always at the local sandbar during the summer via boat. But I do think that I put more hours on the yak than I do the boat. Kayak fishing is just very addictive !!!
    jgocnk.jpg
    Tight Lines..
  • gettinwetgettinwet Posts: 1,366 Officer
    Basstar wrote: »
    Thanks so much for the responses and this is very encouraging to me that my gut instincts to "Kayak Only" during my Florida visits are seemingly right on.

    I sold my flats boat after my daughter was born because it was just sitting in the garage.........now, I've been wade fishing the northern Indian River Lagoon and MIWR in the Titusville, Fl area almost exclusively for the past decade. Seems like I fish more and have become a better angler......and have also caught some of the biggest trout and reds in my life..........on light tackle..........up close and personal. Though, now with the proliferation of alligators plus to extend my range I'm seriously considering purchasing a pro angler or similar kayak.
    There are only so many casts in life, so shut up and fish!!
  • Lt.FireDogLt.FireDog Posts: 1,112 Officer
    When I made the mistake of buying a kayak for skinny water, as opposed to the technical skiff I had planned on, the future of my latest boat was bleak.
    I had a Everglades 223 Bay loaded up with all the toys, but once I found a true fishing kayak, it was so much easier to sneak out with the yak instead of the full day commitment of the boat.
    The last year I hade the boat, it went to the Keys twice, sandbar maybe five times and once offshore, which was ridiculous when you consider monthly payment, dry storage, insurance, fuel & maintenance costs.

    That was a "crapload" of kayaks ago, and I'm still good with it (NMZ), but I do believe that another flats or bayboat is in my future.....

    Day it was delivered, almost as exciting as the day it left....... :grin
    P2090615.jpg
  • BasstarBasstar Posts: 517 Officer
    Lt.FireDog wrote: »
    When I made the mistake of buying a kayak for skinny water, as opposed to the technical skiff I had planned on, the future of my latest boat was bleak.
    I had a Everglades 223 Bay loaded up with all the toys, but once I found a true fishing kayak, it was so much easier to sneak out with the yak instead of the full day commitment of the boat.
    The last year I hade the boat, it went to the Keys twice, sandbar maybe five times and once offshore, which was ridiculous when you consider monthly payment, dry storage, insurance, fuel & maintenance costs.

    That was a "crapload" of kayaks ago, and I'm still good with it (NMZ), but I do believe that another flats or bayboat is in my future.....

    Day it was delivered, almost as exciting as the day it left....... :grin
    P2090615.jpg

    Posted like a true boat owner and believe me, I totally understand. I have a small boat for freshwater, bass, crappie, etc. and had considered upgrading to a more saltwater friendly boat since I no longer own a true tournament bass boat and somehow feel a bit naked without it.

    BUT..................for some reason, when I consider actually pulling the trigger on another expensive boat, I just do not get the excitement nor the warm fuzzies I did in the past.

    For now, I am going to focus on the kayak until and if, I really get a deep boat buying itch that I must scratch.
  • crackedconchcrackedconch Posts: 380 Deckhand
    I've actually have kicked around the idea of just renting a boat whenever I want to do something more than yak fishing. It almost makes more sense. Boat rentals are on average $200 plus gas and tax. There's no cleaning, no maintenance, no trailering or storage. Just like several other people on here have said, I use the kayak quite a bit because of the ease and expense. So, for the once in a while I might just rent instead of own.....I don't know, still kicking it around.

    Mike
    Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things!!

    Pioneer 197 Sportfish
    Suzuki DF150
  • RizanglerRizangler Posts: 148 Deckhand
    I also am sitting on the fence. I just got hit with a $2000 repair bill on my 20 ft Blue Wave, ran over fishing line, wraped around prop shaft, never noticed till seals leaked and failure! I've been fishing out a Hobie outback I picked up for $1000 I found used 2 years ago and love it. I seem to catch bigger fish and have more fun from it. Wife has a hobie and loves it also. I was loking into a new boat; G3 20 bay or Alumacraft 20 ft bay. It will be over $25K.

    I could buy another hobie kayak and get a Pro angler, standing on this to fly fish would be a great advantage. As of today I am leaning away from a new boat and dreaming of sellling my 20' once its repaired. The plan to escape using a boat to fish is to just not use it a few months and focus on kayaking. Then I can break the boaing habit!
    20' Blue Wave
    12' Hobie Outback
    13' Native Slayer Propel
  • BasstarBasstar Posts: 517 Officer
    Rizangler wrote: »
    I also am sitting on the fence. I just got hit with a $2000 repair bill on my 20 ft Blue Wave, ran over fishing line, wraped around prop shaft, never noticed till seals leaked and failure! I've been fishing out a Hobie outback I picked up for $1000 I found used 2 years ago and love it. I seem to catch bigger fish and have more fun from it. Wife has a hobie and loves it also. I was loking into a new boat; G3 20 bay or Alumacraft 20 ft bay. It will be over $25K.

    I could buy another hobie kayak and get a Pro angler, standing on this to fly fish would be a great advantage. As of today I am leaning away from a new boat and dreaming of sellling my 20' once its repaired. The plan to escape using a boat to fish is to just not use it a few months and focus on kayaking. Then I can break the boaing habit!

    Actually, $25K sounds like a bargain! The boats I look at are all $40K, $50K and up by the time I add accessories, graphs, etc., and our bass boats are now topping $60K to $70K.......................AND UP!

    To put it in perspective, I was telling a friend a couple of weeks ago that I could buy a new kayak of choice, even a Hobie Mirage with all of the trimmings for basically the cost of the sales tax of a new boat and depending on the boat I chose, perhaps have money left over for some new rods and tackle.

    Obviously, the money is a factor but actually isn't the primary one. I am just finding myself less enchanted but the prospects of owning a boat and the hassle and effort that entails than I did in the past. Of course I have owned more boats over the years than I can count....ALMOST! :)
  • cprcpr Posts: 9,309 Admiral
    Sold my boat and fish yak, shore and pier 90% of the time. The other 10% is off a friends boat. The only time I really needed a boat was when I went to the Keys. And when I go again, I'll rent a boat. For a mainly inshore west coast guy like me, a yak is as much as I need.
    "The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function." F. Scott Fitzgerald

    "Prediction is very difficult, especially if it's about the future." Niels Bohr
  • DinnertimeDinnertime Posts: 57 Deckhand
    Not yet, but I relish the idea of the simplicity and getting back to the basics of fishing, not working on boats.
  • BarrellBarrell Posts: 1,182 Officer
    See my new post on the solo skiff. You can have the best of both worlds. I do it all. Power boat is on the lift. Dragonfly standup is up on the dock. On the floating doch are two hobie mirage drives and the solo skiff.
    Basstar wrote: »
    I have owned boats now for 40 years an still own one but am seriously considering going totally NMZ.

    FWIW, everything about NOT owning a boat is very appealing from a financial and hassle standpoint but I am a bit insecure to turn loose of a boat totally and instead, have a couple of kayaks to replace it.

    Anyone here done this and if so, how has the transition been?

    Am I really going to miss the boat by being able to cover more water or is this more just my insecurity of making the change that is making me have the cautious feelings?
  • nuclearfishnnuclearfishn Posts: 8,356 Admiral
    Just sold my offshore cat this friday. Looking at getting a SUP to fish off of.
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