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1st Annual Statewide Nonnative Fish Catch, Click and Submit Contest

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1st Annual Statewide Nonnative Fish Catch, Click and Submit Contest

The objectives of the Nonnative Fish Catch, Click and Submit Contest are: 1) to document the distribution of nonnative fish in Florida using angler-caught fish that are photographed and reported to ECISMA through the EDDMaps reporting system, 2) to increase public awareness of the potential negative impacts of releasing nonnative fish into Florida waters, and 3) to encourage anglers to target nonnative species for consumption.

Rules and Regulations

Registration: All anglers must register with EDDMaps.org to submit photographs and catch data.

2015 Nonnative Fish Catch, Click and Submit Contest Start/Stop: The 2015 Nonnative Fish Catch, Click and Submit Contest begins at 6:00 am Saturday, February 21, 2015 and all entries must be received by 12:00 am Sunday, March 1st, 2015. All EDDMap submissions must be complete with catch location and picture to be considered.

Boundaries: The boundaries are all legal freshwater fishing areas in the State of Florida.

Prizes: (Prizes will be announced on March 28th, 2015) Prizes will be given for the most nonnative fish species and for the most unusual nonnative fish catch.

Prize Structure: All participants are entered for a chance to win a Garmin eTrex 20 GPS and other non-cash prizes. Non-cash prizes include merchandise and promotional items with a total value up to $10.00.

Category

Most Unusual Catch - Adult

First Prize - $75 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt
Second Prize - $50 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt
Third Prize - $25 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt

Most Species - Adult

First Prize - $75 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt
Second Prize - $50 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt
Third Prize - $25 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt

Most Unusual Catch - Youth

First Prize - $50 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt
Second Prize - $25 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt
Third Prize - $15 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt

Most Species - Youth

First Prize - $50 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt
Second Prize - $25 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt
Third Prize - $15 gift certificate to Bass Pro Shop and Lionfish Be the Predator T-shirt


State and Federal Regulations: All fish must be caught in compliance with all State of Florida regulations (seewww.myfwc.com/fishing/freshwater/regulations/ or visit a local bait and tackle shop) and only within legal fishing areas. Native fish are not eligible for consideration. Miccosukee and Seminole Indians may harvest nonnative fish with traditional methods.

Additional Regulations: We encourage anglers to catch, keep, and eat all nonnative fish they catch. Please properly dispose of any unwanted fish.

Waiver disclaimer: It is expressly understood that participants in the 2015 Nonnative Fish Catch, Click, and Submit enter at their own risk and that Everglades CISMA and all participating organizations, Officers, Event Sponsors, and Committees, and all other persons connected directly or indirectly with the operation of said event, shall be exempt from any liability for liable, slander, loss, damage, negligence, harm, injury, or death suffered by any participant, entrant, vessel, and equipment, companions, and guests, boat captains, mates, or crew members, which may occur in conjunction with the 2015 Nonnative Fish Catch, Click, and Submit.

Participants: Any and all participants entering the 2015 Nonnative Fish Catch, Click and Submit Contest agree that all decisions made by the 2015 Nonnative Fish Catch, Click and Submit Contest committee/rules committee shall be final and binding in any manner requiring their action.

Qualifying Submissions: All EDDMap submissions must be complete with catch location, picture(s), and a statement indicating the submission is for the Nonnative Fish Catch, Click, and Submit Contest to be considered. Detailed catch location, GPS coordinates, and if the angler is a youth under 16 or an adult would be very helpful. An EDDMaps submission may contain photographs of multiple species if all species are caught from the same location. If nonnative fish are caught from multiple locations, then an EDDMaps submission must be made for each location.

Photo Recommendations: Take fish out of water and for most species, lay flat so the head points to the left, place on a light color background, preferably in the shade to reduce glare, and extend the fins as much as possible. If possible, include a ruler in the photo or provide a length in the report. For nonnative catfish, take a side-shot with dorsal fin extended and a photo of the belly showing the markings.


The 1st Annual Statewide Nonnative Fish Catch, Click and Submit Contest is being held during the National Invasive Species Awareness Week, February 22-28, 2015. However, submissions of non-native fish (or other non-native species) can be made anytime throughEDDMapS.

Replies

  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 10,173 Moderator
    The South Florida guys should have it easy on this one.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    http://www.wuft.org/news/2015/02/27/fwc-hosts-first-statewide-nonnative-fish-catch/



    WUFT News
    FWC Hosts First Statewide Nonnative Fish Catch
    By Marena Smith on February 27th, 2015
    nonnativefishphoto1

    A Mayan cichlid, caught by John Petersen, a participant of the Nonnative Fish Catch, Click and Submit Contest, measures about six and a half inches. These fish are part of a long list of invasive species that disrupt the natural state of Florida’s native fish population. Photo courtesy of John Petersen.

    Sometimes Florida biologists like to see a fish out of water.

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is hosting Florida’s first statewide nonnative fish catch to reduce the growing population of troublesome fish species in the state’s waterways.

    The Nonnative Fish Catch, Click and Submit Contest, which will last until March 1, involves catching nonnative fish, photographing them and submitting the photos to the FWC.

    The contest is open to all licensed fishers in Florida and extends to all legal, freshwater fishing areas in the state.

    The contest is a part of National Invasive Species Awareness week taking place Feb. 22-28. It focuses on educating people about the invasive plants and animals that disrupt natural ecosystems.

    Kelly Gestring, a biologist at the FWC, said that there are only so many fish that biologists can find and capture on their own.

    “Florida is a very big state and has an awful lot of water in it, and there are many places which are not frequently sampled by fish biologists,” Gestring said.

    Nonnative fish act as invasive competitors against the native populations. They can steal resources, spread disease and prey on native fish, according to Gestring.

    John Petersen, a contest participant, sees this kind of habitat destruction happening in his backyard.

    He said he has seen a huge increase in the number of nonnative fish that he reels in over the past two or three years.

    The most common invader in Florida is the sailfin catfish. It’s well known among biologists for its tendency to make large burrows on the banks of rivers that contribute to shoreline erosion, according to Gestring.
    John Petersen lines up his bounty of invasive fish for the FWC's Nonnative Fish Catch, Click and Submit Contest. The Mayan cichlid is one of the many invasive species whose population increase is becoming a problem for the native habitats of Florida.

    John Petersen lines the invasive fish he caught after only two hours of fishing for FWC’s Nonnative Fish Catch, Click and Submit contest. The Mayan cichlid is one of the many invasive species whose population increase is becoming a problem for the native habitats of Florida. Photo courtesy of John Petersen.

    “I see those sailfin cats all the time and they’re just tearing things up,” Petersen said.

    Blue tilapia and Mayan cichlids are also invasive species that are starting to affect native fish habitats across the state.

    Petersen said that lately, he hooks about six Mayan cichlids and only one native fish, like the blue gill, when he’s on the water.

    The Nonnative Fish Catch, Click and Submit Contest hopes to help solve this problem through involvement, awareness and education.

    “I wish [the contest] would run year-round,” Petersen said.

    Gestring hopes to see hundreds, if not thousands, of reports coming into the FWC from participants submitting their exotic catches.

    “You know, we sure wish the fish weren’t here,” Gestring said. “And part of what we try to do is develop ways in which folks can utilize these unwanted species and that’s part of the essence behind the contest.”

    While people can play a big role in removing these species, they are also part of the problem.

    Pet owners who dump unwanted fish into lakes and rivers are a major contributor to the rise in invasive fish species, Gestring said.

    “That’s very problematic because of the interconnectedness of our state’s water bodies,” he said. “There’s thousands of miles of canals that are connected to one another.”

    Liz Barraco, spokeswoman for the FWC, said the event is about raising awareness of the nonnative fish and the issues they cause in Florida.

    “People who are out there participating in activities and recreation,” Barraco said. “I think it’s important for them to know what’s happening in the ecosystem around them.”

    Those interested can register at http://www.eddmaps.org/ and view the contest rules and prizes at http://www.floridainvasives.org/CatchClickSubmit/index.cfm.
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