Bangsticks

mossyhorn9mossyhorn9 Posts: 321 Deckhand
I have used 357 and 44 mag bang sticks for gator hunting and both work well but I am now considering a 12 gauge. Anyone use one? Thoughts?
You can blame it on my rebel raisin'...

Replies

  • bswivbswiv Posts: 7,552 Admiral
    mossyhorn9 wrote: »
    I have used 357 and 44 mag bang sticks for gator hunting and both work well but I am now considering a 12 gauge. Anyone use one? Thoughts?

    As someone who has CLEAND hundreds of wild gators, almost all dispatched with bang sticks of one kind or another I have to ask you why?

    Beyond the fact that a .357 is less expensive to use, less likely to leave the ears ringing if it's set off to close to the surface, and does a fine job on even the biggest gators, there is the issue of meat damage.

    When you consider that gator meat carries a wholesale price in excess of $8 most places the sheer waste associated with setting off a 12ga at the base of a gators skull makes no sense. Even if you use slugs ( the price thing again comes to mind ) the 12ga is going to do more damage. If you use a shot shell it's even worse.

    Seen it first hand. Spent time digging shot out and cutting meat away.......just not worth it.
  • mossyhorn9mossyhorn9 Posts: 321 Deckhand
    bswiv wrote: »
    As someone who has CLEAND hundreds of wild gators, almost all dispatched with bang sticks of one kind or another I have to ask you why?

    Beyond the fact that a .357 is less expensive to use, less likely to leave the ears ringing if it's set off to close to the surface, and does a fine job on even the biggest gators, there is the issue of meat damage.

    When you consider that gator meat carries a wholesale price in excess of $8 most places the sheer waste associated with setting off a 12ga at the base of a gators skull makes no sense. Even if you use slugs ( the price thing again comes to mind ) the 12ga is going to do more damage. If you use a shot shell it's even worse.

    Seen it first hand. Spent time digging shot out and cutting meat away.......just not worth it.

    Good point. Maybe bigger isn't necessarily better... No pun intended. :rotflmao
    You can blame it on my rebel raisin'...
  • huntmstrhuntmstr Posts: 6,290 Admiral
    I've seen a 12ga used twice and it was totally unnecessary and left a huge hole in the gator that wasted meat and rendered the skull of one useless. I stick to .357.
    Bushnell, Primos and Final Approach Pro Staff. Proud member of the Fab Five, Big Leaugers and Bobble Head 4.

    I had you pissed off at hello.
  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 10,553 AG
    .22mag works good.
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • pbsnookerpbsnooker Posts: 882 Officer
    357 here also, no need to go bigger, if in doubt hit it again!
  • DropTine797DropTine797 Posts: 681 Officer
    A .22 will do the job every time
    But that's in a perfect situation with a perfect shot
    You don't always get that
    I use a .44 because it's more forgiving
    You can hit the skull and it will still leave a nice mark and probably get tape on his mouth
    A 12 ga is the most forgiving but that's a big round like chuck said
    Its personal preference
    Seven down, Eight to go.
  • mossyhorn9mossyhorn9 Posts: 321 Deckhand
    Killed a ten footer the other night and had to shoot it 3 times with a 357, that's what got me thinking of a bigger round. I'm sure the real reason is shot placement but I was thinking bigger would leave less room for error.
    You can blame it on my rebel raisin'...
  • huntsfloridahuntsflorida Posts: 378 Deckhand
    bswiv wrote: »
    As someone who has CLEAND hundreds of wild gators, almost all dispatched with bang sticks of one kind or another I have to ask you why?

    Beyond the fact that a .357 is less expensive to use, less likely to leave the ears ringing if it's set off to close to the surface, and does a fine job on even the biggest gators, there is the issue of meat damage.

    When you consider that gator meat carries a wholesale price in excess of $8 most places the sheer waste associated with setting off a 12ga at the base of a gators skull makes no sense. Even if you use slugs ( the price thing again comes to mind ) the 12ga is going to do more damage. If you use a shot shell it's even worse.

    Seen it first hand. Spent time digging shot out and cutting meat away.......just not worth it.

    X2
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  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 10,553 AG
    A .22 will do the job every time
    But that's in a perfect situation with a perfect shot
    You don't always get that
    I use a .44 because it's more forgiving
    You can hit the skull and it will still leave a nice mark and probably get tape on his mouth
    A 12 ga is the most forgiving but that's a big round like chuck said
    Its personal preference
    .22 has worked for me for 42 years.
    Just saying.
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • bgeorgebgeorge Plant City FLPosts: 1,634 Captain
    I have used a 12ga and never had to hit a second time when using it. When selling I suggest people purchase the caliber that they already have shells for. They all will do a good job if the gator is hit the proper place. One inch off can miss the spine. Heck we are taking more and more without ever using the bangstick. Pocket knife is quiet and an adrenalin rush. We have not used the 12ga in a number of years and have been using the 44 because we have an excess of ammo for it.
    The man who moves a mountain begins by carrying away small stones. Hopefully the next man is not dropping his stones on the mountain you are trying to move.
  • ANUMBER1ANUMBER1 Posts: 10,553 AG
    I have used a screwdriver and a small hammer.
    I am glad to only be a bird hunter with bird dogs...being a shooter or dog handler or whatever other niche exists to separate appears to generate far too much about which to worry.
  • BowtechGen3BowtechGen3 Altoona, FlPosts: 778 Officer
    We got a 12 gauge several years back and most times we hit them 1 time and it is lights out. But we used to use a 44 and it did the job when it hits the right spot. The biggest problem that we had with it is that we seemed to get alot of dud bullets when using the 44. I tried everything but it always seemed like only 1/2 of them went off. I don't if it was something we were doing that was causing it but we don't have that issue now.
    Director - Central Florida Dog Hunters & Sportsmans Association
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  • bgeorgebgeorge Plant City FLPosts: 1,634 Captain
    Some of the duds come from how the bang stick is made. I see more issues with o ring style sticking and not hitting the primer with a quick punch. Spring style seems to have a more consistent mechanism. One way to make the o ring style slide a little smoother is to put a light coat of oil on the o rings. I will rub it where the nose meets the face and that little bit of facial oil will do wonders.
    The man who moves a mountain begins by carrying away small stones. Hopefully the next man is not dropping his stones on the mountain you are trying to move.
  • mossyhorn9mossyhorn9 Posts: 321 Deckhand
    bgeorge wrote: »
    Some of the duds come from how the bang stick is made. I see more issues with o ring style sticking and not hitting the primer with a quick punch. Spring style seems to have a more consistent mechanism. One way to make the o ring style slide a little smoother is to put a light coat of oil on the o rings. I will rub it where the nose meets the face and that little bit of facial oil will do wonders.

    I'm glad you brought this up. I was wondering what the differences and advantages/disadvantages of the spring style vs. hairpin(o-ring) were. Any other opinions?
    You can blame it on my rebel raisin'...
  • Derek ArsuaDerek Arsua Posts: 2,474 Officer
    I make my own and I have both 357 and 44 mag I personally have never had to hit a gator more than once with either. I prefer the 44 mag as it seemed to really have better affect. Shot placement is key 2" back from the skull dead center and game over no problem. As far as the 12 gauge sure it will work but why I think you can pretty much count on all neck meat lost and maybe some jaw. Go with 180 gr jacketed soft points
  • bgeorgebgeorge Plant City FLPosts: 1,634 Captain
    One other thing that makes a big difference is the size of the gator you are putting down. Big gators have a lot of resistance where smaller gators will be pushed more. I have had to hit a gator a little harder with the o ring style. With the added force, accuracy is sometimes lost in the process.
    The man who moves a mountain begins by carrying away small stones. Hopefully the next man is not dropping his stones on the mountain you are trying to move.
  • Derek ArsuaDerek Arsua Posts: 2,474 Officer
    I make the double O-ring style and machine them so they slide without having to apply too much force all you need is 4" before you hit your mark give it a sharp jab I have had multiple duds but I'm guessing that was water related and my firing pin was too large in diameter at first it was 1/8" I have since made it tapered to a smaller point and haven't had any real issues. I like the design and function of a spring loaded one but the reliability and simplicity of the O-Ring style has won me over.
  • DropTine797DropTine797 Posts: 681 Officer
    With o rings you have to mean it when you hit em
    Seven down, Eight to go.
  • cfthcfth Posts: 421 Deckhand
    Let me start off by saying that I mfg and sell o-ring bangsticks. Just as BG sells spring sticks.

    Years ago prior to mfg sticks I used a spring stick. After a year or two I started having problems with the parts sliding and then with the barrel threading all the way onto the receiver. This turned out to be quite a common problem.

    Generally speaking stainless on stainless will gall after a period of time. It's a fact. So sooner or later the spring stick will fail. Now with constant lubrication etc should be ok. So when we decided to make sticks I decided to use the "kiss" theory of design. (Keep it simple stupid).

    Yes you have to lubricate o-rings. But other then that there is not much to go wrong.

    Additionally they are cheaper to mfg and therefore cheaper to the public.

    Just to give an idea I probably harvested approx 40-50 gators with the spring stick.

    I harvested in one year 160-170 with the o-ring stick and just replaced the o-rings once.

    The other thing to keep in mind is that the spring stick does not use a spring to make the bullet go off. It simply keeps the "chamber" forward of the firing pin. The force required to compress the spring is how hard you must hit the gator with. (Also you must overcome any friction of mud on ss and ss on ss that build up over time).

    With a o-ring stick you simply have to overcome the friction of the o-ring to ss. If they are cared for correctly. Very easy.

    Lastly all this goes out the window if the tolerance are not correct.

    That's what separates the good sticks from the junk. :)
    Capt. Grayson Padrick
    www.centralfloridatrophyhunts.com
    Alligator Hunts, Alligator Hunting Equipment, Alligator and Wild Game Processing
  • bgeorgebgeorge Plant City FLPosts: 1,634 Captain
    We actually sell both in person but none on the internet where we can not ID the person making the purchase.

    There is nothing wrong with the o ring style. Both have their pros and cons. Many people have had the steel cable holding the o ring barrel has been blown apart during the shot and people have had the barrel stick in the gators head and yanked off. Not the normal case and not sure what the particulars that lead up to the situation. They may have been hitting above the water line. Spring style without barrels with cables can cause you to misplace your barrel when you need it most.

    As Grayson points out tolerances are key to proceeding issues. All bang sticks of the same style are not equal. Every manufacture needs to be evaluated on their own. CFTH stands by their bang sticks and will warranty it if necessary.

    You know you have the wrong one when you do not have confidence when you pick it up.
    The man who moves a mountain begins by carrying away small stones. Hopefully the next man is not dropping his stones on the mountain you are trying to move.
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