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Rubber Worms

Hey guys! Quick question:

I know it is pretty much the opposite season, but when it comes to fishing in winter(dec-feb) do you prefer the large ribbon tail worms or the paddle/straight tail worms. I know the ribbon tail worms are 70 percent tail action, whereas worms like Manns jelly worm are more body action.

Simply, which one is better for those times of year?

Thanks!!

Replies

  • Austins26Austins26 Posts: 1,989 Captain
    it's a 6 or two 3's

    lots an lots of variables

    fish them slow either will catch big fish

    I use/like Mann's 12inch jelly your right they have a great (snake like) action

    I also use/like Bass Pro Shops Squirmin' Super Worm
    mainly 12 inch



    but both catch fish on a given day

    all colors will catch fish I prefer an natural color black, browns, junebug etc the darker colors tend to be hardier, hence fewer worms lost
    The Original HOTD poster
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  • JettyparkJettypark Posts: 1,969 Captain
    It will also depend on how "YOU" are working the worm.... and the most important factor> What the bass
    want
    ... I fish with a guy who tears the moving tails off all his large worms... and I leave them on...
    then I have other guy who only use 7in worms with a small paddle tail...... ( we fish a lot together) and
    depending on what the bass want on that nite... we will change up our attack plan..... we also tend to fish all
    our worms weightless....and with a slow retrieve .... but I like to twitch the worm and at times work it pretty
    quick...


    So far it has even itself out> some nites the bass will hit everything and other nites they are keying in on one
    type of movement and size worm...

    In other words if you go fishing with a plan> You better have backup plans because thru all the yrs of fishing..
    I have finally learn there is no such thing a "Sure thing" .....just like wimmin...:grin

    The other piece of advise is Water temp/weather> this rule tends to keep a pattern>>> when fishing Cold water
    less is always more> Smaller lure and a super slow retrieve has always work for me in both fresh/salt :wink
    aa13.gif"A ship without Marines is like a garment without buttons"
  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 10,317 Moderator
    Jettypark wrote: »
    It will also depend on how "YOU" are working the worm.... and the most important factor> What the bass
    want
    ... I fish with a guy who tears the moving tails off all his large worms... and I leave them on...
    then I have other guy who only use 7in worms with a small paddle tail...... ( we fish a lot together) and
    depending on what the bass want on that nite... we will change up our attack plan..... we also tend to fish all
    our worms weightless....and with a slow retrieve .... but I like to twitch the worm and at times work it pretty
    quick...


    So far it has even itself out> some nites the bass will hit everything and other nites they are keying in on one
    type of movement and size worm...

    In other words if you go fishing with a plan> You better have backup plans because thru all the yrs of fishing..
    I have finally learn there is no such thing a "Sure thing" .....just like wimmin...:grin

    The other piece of advise is Water temp/weather> this rule tends to keep a pattern>>> when fishing Cold water
    less is always more> Smaller lure and a super slow retrieve has always work for me in both fresh/salt :wink

    :Agree Confidence plays a big factor. You will eventually find yourself leaning toward a particular size,color and retrieve.
    Usually because it has worked "best" in the past. This can also get you in a rut so don't be afraid to change gears when
    your main stay attack s l o w s down.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • StratosStratos Posts: 149 Officer
    I'm a fan of the Zoom Speed worm myself.
  • capt louiecapt louie citrus countyPosts: 10,317 Moderator
    Stratos wrote: »
    I'm a fan of the Zoom Speed worm myself.

    They are versatile . A go to for me.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • Alex from GAAlex from GA Posts: 1,496 Officer
    I've caught most of my bass, and I've caught a lot, on one kind and color worm. Every where from CA to AR to GA and FL. Lakes, rivers and ponds. Green pumpkin finesse Texas rigged.
  • davids8477davids8477 Posts: 213 Deckhand
    My goto plastic over the last few weeks is a zoom super fluke. Pumpkin green.
    Bass seem to murder it.
    Fished weightless with a medium slow retrieve.
  • JettyparkJettypark Posts: 1,969 Captain
    Most time when it comes to worms...I can give five people the same worm/setup that I'm using... I mean everything the Same..
    even the same area..
    and 2 out of the five will end up catching bass with me, while other 3 not even get a hit...


    Why?? because 90% of worm fishing is what action you impart on it... what type of retrieve you use and
    if you are willing to change things up...

    I have seen this madness in salt/fresh water... fishermen unwilling to change things and have a single mindset
    of what's the Best color/size/retrieve and action... day in and day out :huh

    Go to any bass fishing tourney and watch how the Pros do it... it will open up your eyes and make you realize
    why some are always in the money...and if you think tourney are fun.... LOL... :willynilly
    aa13.gif"A ship without Marines is like a garment without buttons"
  • RealSeabeeRealSeabee Posts: 583 Officer
    everybody that replied on here is giving 100% best advice so I have nothing really to add except two things 1. How you work "it" matters and most do NOT have the patience for Plastics. 2. If you only use them Dec-Feb you are missing the second season...dead of summer, early morning. On the St John's River I work back in the sloughs among the Lilly Pads very slow with Mann's no. 8 and 12 from now until about the end of June. In all fairness I also have a BrokeBack Rapala rigged along with a Devil Horse (yes, the Prop Bait type) that I work along the outside of the Lilly Pads. Only about the first two hours of the morning then I switch to chasing the Schoolie Bass with lines out for Channel Cat's. Red fish get a lot of my attention from now (when the lovebugs started) through the end of July.
    When Practice meets opportunity, Set-The-Hook!
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