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Bleeding gills flies

Hey guys,

I wanted to get some different opinions on "bleeding gills" flies. I just added "bleeding gills" to my version of the Crease fly. I can also install them on the tube versions very easily.

We all know that a brand new pack of Dorado will most likely eat just about anything you toss to them, however, as soon as they get gun shy (jaded) they can get tough, I was hoping this extra effort might help. Your opinions would be greatly appreciated.

Carl Blackledge

Replies

  • Ol'DirtyCasterOl'DirtyCaster Posts: 2,385 Captain
    I'm a firm believer in contrast. Whether they see them as bleeding gills or not, I have no idea, but I do believe a bit of red/pink/orange on an otherwise drab profile can make all the difference.
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 3,906 Captain
    I like contrast as well - but only when it doesn't interfere with the action of the fly or popper... My favorite tactic for jaded dolphin (or any other fish that comes to the fly or bug and won't take...) is simply to take it away from them. Do that abruptly two or three times to a dolph (quickly returning it after snatching it away each time) and the last time you quickly slap it down it will get murdered...
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • Carl BlackledgeCarl Blackledge Posts: 674 Officer
    Bob.

    I been doing those "teasing tactics" for 20 years at least.......your right you will get some very exciting blow ups, I can't get enough of Dorado on the fly. My favorite fish by a mile.

    Carl
  • Colorado TroutbumColorado Troutbum Posts: 102 Officer
    Hi Carl, I am going to preface this with the fact that while I am learning, I have little experience in your neck of the woods, that said IMHO when you are competing against a large volume forage base, presenting a fly that represents an impression of what your target is focused on, but also stands out from naturals is key. Not to disparage ultra realistic flies; perfect imitations look amazingly real-serious works of art/time & skill. But when trying to catch fish focused on a bait ball, or 10k size 22 midges you don’t want your fly to get lost in the herd.
    Adding the red gills to a fly matching size and to some extent color to what you are trying to replicate helps it appear separate to the predator, & if presented well gives you a better shot at them taking it…I use an analogy taken from a line in “Saving Private Ryan” - You want your needle to get some attention in the haystack of needles, just take care that it is not so much that it doesn’t represent the needle anymore.
    I’d like to hear from others if this holds true in Florida/saltwater?
  • ditzditz Posts: 33 Deckhand
    IMO....Sometimes one does not need to match the hatch. Anything that appears edible will work. If matching the hatch is needed and the hatch is a sparse hatch then a close look-alike may be best. If the hatch is thick then a close match but something different will bring more action. Color or size difference can be the trigger. Sometimes an injured look or action is the key.
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