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Got drum? An SBS for a bug with no name.

Ol'DirtyCasterOl'DirtyCaster Posts: 2,385 Captain
Like alot of guys my time on the water this time of year is essentially just killing time until the spring migration of atlantic menhaden brings forth the chrome giants. Until then we play, finding anything that'll show us some backing. It was recently brought to my attention that I catch a few more black drum than most in my area, and this little bug has to claim at least partial credit. It usually gets nailed on the drop, while fishing unsuspecting schools of cruising blacks. Anyway, thought I would share since more than one person has asked about this fly. It has no name, and probably never will. If it takes more than 5 minutes you're doing something wrong.

List of materials

Hook: Gami SL45, SL11, SS15, or SP-113L3H. #8-#2
Eyes: Your call (I'm using midge sized brass)
Flash: Rootbeer crysral flash
Thread: Whatever. I'm using .004 mono.
Body: Peacock herl (4 strands)
wing: beaver (fox or nutria makes a great sub, and it's much cheaper).
1 Pheasant rump hackle or mallard flank


Start by adding your eyes and a base wrap, use head cement as needed.

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Tie in 3-4 strands of crystal flash.

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Tie in 3-5 strands of peacock herl off the back of the fly, and trim off your ends.

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Now spin up your herl until it tightens up, you'll know if you're too tight because it will break.

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Now palmer your herl forward and tie it down. You don't need to cut it, just pull back at 180 degrees and it'll pop off flush.

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Tie in a sparse wing of beaver/nutria/fox, a little goes a very long way.

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Now tie in your pheasant/mallard flank, then palmer it forward 2-3 times.

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Pull your wing up tight and wrap it down, this will create a wing that will act as a weed guard of sorts. That's it, tie off and go fishing.

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Replies

  • Carl BlackledgeCarl Blackledge Posts: 674 Officer
    Hey Dirty,

    Nice fly.

    Peacock herl is very fishy looking stuff, the problem with the stuff is it's very brittle, If you stack the herl on the back of a streamer, it's always the first think to break off, also if you use it as a body wrap, just retrieving it thru the water and if you hit any kind of snag it just falls apart, also the first fish usually destroys it.

    I think if I was tying that fly I would wind that peacock herl around a dark green peacock colored 3/0 thread. It's a great looking fly, however if "anything " touch's the peacock heal it will break instantly. If you wrap it around the thread, it won't cure that problem, but will help it last longer. my 2 cents

    Carl Blckledge
  • Ol'DirtyCasterOl'DirtyCaster Posts: 2,385 Captain
    It is very delicate stuff, and I should have mentioned that midge sparkle braid makes an outstanding substitute (and they make it in peacock). To be perfectly honest the reason I use so much peacock is because I scored about 2lbs of it (seriously, imagine what 2lbs of peacock herl looks like) from a freind of mines widow. Black drum have fleshy mouths and I really haven't had a huge issue with these coming apart, but I usually change flies after 2-3 fish anyway, just to stay sharp. This fly took a red and two blacks early this morning and it's no worse for wear, but good to mention it anyway.

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  • Carl BlackledgeCarl Blackledge Posts: 674 Officer
    Dirty,

    There are several imitations of peacock herl, but like you said, they are all imitations compared to the real McCoy.

    Peacock is a very fishy material, I personally think its worth the time to use it.

    In the old days when I trout fished on a regular basis, I tied Zug bugs and PT nymphs by the thousands, it sure seemed after 2-3 fish when the peacock herl broke and was falling off the hook, the fish seemed to like the fly better...Go figure

    Carl Blackledge
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