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Corrosion on reels, how to remove?

Jax R WildJax R Wild Posts: 52 Greenhorn
Is there a product that reel parts with corrosion can be soaked in that removes it?

KK

reel1_zpsaa081f08.jpg

Replies

  • johnDjohnD WC FLPosts: 6,413 Admiral
  • Jax R WildJax R Wild Posts: 52 Greenhorn
    Metal parts. Reel body, side plate , etc.
  • hossmosshossmoss Posts: 1,304 Officer
    Best thing I have found is WD40 and fine steel wool. The WD40 softens and lubricates and the steel wool cleans and polishes. I have made my grandfather's old Senators look almost new this way.

    For inside parts I will use the WD40 and some very fine wet or dry sandpaper (like 600) laid flat on my table or bench. Then I polish up with the steel wool.


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  • reel stamasreel stamas Posts: 6,153 Admiral
    Be careful w/ 'CLR'
    There should be NO Commercial Fishing for any fish species considered 'Over-fished' , 'Undergoing Overfishing' or Subject to Recreational Seasons, Limits, or Closures... Game Fish Status IS the Answer !!!
  • waldnerrwaldnerr Posts: 1,028 Officer
    White vinegar followed by a freshwater rinse, drying, and a coating of CorrosionX or Corrosion Block. If the corrosion has penetrated the chrome or paint, the chrome/paint will likely come off with the vinegar (acetic acid) bath.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 AG
    WARNING! Will Robinson! Most antique reel restorers frown on using "wet or dry sandpaper" & strongly recommend against it for anything except the most specialized applications. Can't tell you how many old reels I've seen that had been permanently damaged by sandpaper.

    It's also mostly Thumbs Down on WD40 too. The fact that "WD40 softens" can be tragic when used on certain old reel plastics & finishes. WD40 has dissolved some old plastics & paints, ruining reels. It can be useful for cleaning, if carefully tested on inconspicuous spot 1st, but falls flat as reel lube. However be particularly cautious if you're considering "soaked in" plans. Some solvent plastic combinations can seem to test OK for a few moments, BUT when "soaked" overnight may result in irreparable damage. Certain plastics can dissolve like sugar, others may swell & not fit.

    Of course if WD40 tests OK on your corroded antique reel fine, it's said to have an extra benefit. Fish oil is a major ingredient, so WD40 that might get from reel to bait may actually act as an attractant!

    Beware that some commonly used aerosols are said to do exactly the opposite. Certain sprays retain powerful scents that can transfer to baits & repel fish! Some sprays are bad for line too.
    hossmoss wrote: »
    Best thing I have found is WD40 and fine steel wool. The WD40 softens and lubricates and the steel wool cleans and polishes. I have made my grandfather's old Senators look almost new this way.

    For inside parts I will use the WD40 and some very fine wet or dry sandpaper (like 600) laid flat on my table or bench. Then I polish up with the steel wool.

    Jax R Wild would do well starting w/the finest steel wool usually available, 000 grade & any light oil that does not soften plastic parts or dissolve any paint. I've had better luck w/Liquid Wrench aerosol penetrants than WD40. Also like PB Blaster especially for AL alloys.

    However w/o seeing what Jax R Wild is working with it's difficult to know what to recommend. Heavy corrosion, accumulated salt & residue from oil/blood/bait on chrome is often best be removed using a burnisher. You can adapt a decent old pocket knife, or scalpel, for the purpose. The strategy is to essentially whittle/shave/scrape off the worst of it. Burnishing can get into all the nooks & crannies that were never cleaned & defy steel wool. If you scratch or abrade the chrome you're doing something wrong.
  • johnDjohnD WC FLPosts: 6,413 Admiral
    I use a few different things depending on how bad they are.

    for internals - pb blaster.
    orange citrus engine degreaser.
    harbor freight Ultra sonic cleaner w/acetone for bearings.
    small wire brushes from harbor freight.
    a regular toothbrush.
    for chrome , 00 steel wool - be careful with steel wool ,make sure you get every bit of it off with a air compressor and elbow grease or you'll have a rusty mess after the first trip out.
    finish the chrome with Flitz Polish Paste.

    re-lube internals with penn grease or cal's grease. that's what I prefer but any marine grease will work.
    re-oil the bearings with ReelX by CorrosionX.

    Keep everything wiped down with penn rod and reel cleaner , reel magic or corrosion x and a terry cloth rag. corrosion block is another useful product.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 AG
    While I use/recommend vinegar to remove rust on old steel/iron tools, I don't find it particularly effective on the brass, German silver, aluminum & SS found on antique reels.
    waldnerr wrote: »
    White vinegar followed by a freshwater rinse, drying, and a coating of CorrosionX or Corrosion Block. If the corrosion has penetrated the chrome or paint, the chrome/paint will likely come off with the vinegar (acetic acid) bath.

    Read that some silicone products used on reels were implicated in passing strong fish repellent scents to baits. Anglers would adopt a maintenance routine of "coating" their reels after each trip & the spray of choice built up on line & reel surface, inevitable traces transferred to baits & then right in fish's sensitive olfactory receptors.

    Should be right up your alley? Ever hear of it? Have a stinking suspicion Corrosion X may have been mentioned. Wish I could recall where story came from.
  • waldnerrwaldnerr Posts: 1,028 Officer
    Yes, certain compounds definitely repel fishes or, at least, deter them from biting. I'm not aware of this occurring with CorrosionX or Corrosion Block, but I haven't heard of these products affecting fishes in any way, positively or negatively. It's certainly a possibility.
  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 20,686 AG
    johnD wrote: »
    00 steel wool - be careful with steel wool ,make sure you get every bit of it off with a air compressor and elbow grease or you'll have a rusty mess after the first trip out.

    Bronze wool perhaps??
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  • Jax R WildJax R Wild Posts: 52 Greenhorn
    Thanks to all for the replies. The parts of the reel that have corrosion are the inside of the frame and side plates which are aluminum.

    reel1_zpsaa081f08.jpg
  • duckmanJRduckmanJR Posts: 20,686 AG
    Of course if WD40 tests OK on your corroded antique reel fine, it's said to have an extra benefit. Fish oil is a major ingredient, so WD40 that might get from reel to bait may actually act as an attractant!

    A little about WD 40 It was made during WWII for the Gov't....
    The name is such because it stands for " Water displacing" and 40 is because it was the 40th attempt at finding a workable formula.

    It does use fish oil....and back in the day..old timers did spray it on thinking it would help as an attractant.
    Some also rubbed cod liver oil on their lures too...
    There are many roads to travel
    Many things to do.
    Knots to be unraveled
    'fore the darkness falls on you
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 AG
    All the WD40 talk got me curious. Various Google hits say WD40 wasn't developed until 1953 by Norm Larsen for nuclear missiles! Was not EZ to find reference to WD40 being "made during WWII" - but I didn't persevere after finding repeat confirmation of Larson '53.
    duckmanJR wrote: »
    A little about WD 40 It was made during WWII for the Gov't....
    The name is such because it stands for " Water displacing" and 40 is because it was the 40th attempt at finding a workable formula.

    It does use fish oil....and back in the day..old timers did spray it on thinking it would help as an attractant.
    Some also rubbed cod liver oil on their lures too...

    Had trouble coming up w/anything regarding WD40 containing fish oil. Had once heard Menhanden oil was used & had seen some younger anglers spraying lures w/WD40. WD40 apparently isn't patented, so its ingredients aren't public, however they don't list fish oil among ingredients that are acknowledged. Snopes claims that WD40's fish oil content is only "a rumor" & what's published is that it's almost entirely hydrocarbons w/little room for fish oil.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 AG
    Sorry, can't be sure, but it looks like what I refer to as Asian plated diecast. High quality aluminum alloys are generally anodized not plated.

    What is it anyway? Sure no antique.
    Jax R Wild wrote: »
    The parts of the reel that have corrosion are the inside of the frame and side plates which are aluminum.

    If so, I'd worry salt corrosion will be constant & aggressive wherever there are chinks in the plating. Cosmetics may become less of a concern. Pay careful attention to screws/threads. Many diecast alloys are prone to corrosion that seizes screws and/or strips out threads. Clean & lube threads, busting/stripping a screw can 'total' a reel.
  • johnDjohnD WC FLPosts: 6,413 Admiral
    That is what saltwater will do to magnesium reels , what model reel is that ?
  • MH79MH79 Posts: 503 Officer
    I've used white wine vinegar and an old tooth brush with great success...cleaned up an old jiggmaster I've had since I was a kid and it looks brand spanking new. Just soaked it after scrubbing the corrosion off with the vinegar in warm soapy water....rinsed it with tap water dried it, regreased it and put it back together. There is also a household cleaner called Sno-Bol that is supposed to work really well for removing corrosion
  • reel stamasreel stamas Posts: 6,153 Admiral
    NO Fish Oil in WD-40 folks... None...
    There should be NO Commercial Fishing for any fish species considered 'Over-fished' , 'Undergoing Overfishing' or Subject to Recreational Seasons, Limits, or Closures... Game Fish Status IS the Answer !!!
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 AG
    Snopes said "Fish Oil in WD-40" was only "rumor" & their 'Secret Formula' is proprietary & that there's room for little else, but the known hydrocarbons anyway.
    NO Fish Oil in WD-40 folks... None...

    However that's an aside, please note that I introduced the idea to make a point: Be careful about what you spray on your reels. Spray coatings on reels & line can get transferred onto baits by handling your gear - where it may act as a fish repellent, or in cases like WD-40, as some suggest, a fish attractant.

    There's good evidence fish are very sensitive to scents in extremely low concentrations.
  • waldnerrwaldnerr Posts: 1,028 Officer
    I've been mulling over the question about CorrosionX or Corrosion Block affecting the feeding behaviors of fishes. I have a couple of wire line outfits that I use for wahoo; the reel on one outfit is a 7.5/0 Fin-Nor (aluminum spool) filled with 200 yds. of monel wire overlying several hundred yards of Dacron. To prevent galvanic corrosion due to the interaction of the monel and aluminum, I regularly spray the monel with CorrosionX, and I sprayed the spool before I filled the reel with line. I've caught a large number of wahoo on this rig and haven't noticed a decline in catch rate when compared to a wire line outfit on which CorrosionX hasn't been applied, but this may not be the best test since wahoo rely largely on vision rather than olfaction when feeding.
  • finbullyfinbully Posts: 748 Officer
    I use Salt Away.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 AG
    Yes. In this context, especially if HS trolling for wahoo, it may be the worst test.
    waldnerr wrote: »
    this may not be the best test since wahoo rely largely on vision rather than olfaction when feeding

    Better perhaps to do testing at night, in murky water, using non-moving bait, on bottom, for Flounder.
  • johnDjohnD WC FLPosts: 6,413 Admiral
    I have never heard of any ill effects from corrosion x. Even antique gun collectors swear by it.

    here's decent thread.

    http://www.thehulltruth.com/sportfishing-charters-forum/50459-reel-corrosion.html

    Alan Tani has a section dedicated to lubricants.

    http://alantani.com/index.php?board=2.0
  • cprcpr Posts: 9,309 Admiral
    http://www.alantani.com

    Alan Tani recommends corrosion X and also likes Teflon laced oils. Read a few of his post or join and ask your question on a reel repair forum.
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  • jaredman1000jaredman1000 Posts: 196 Officer
    WD-40
    Native WaterCraft Redfish 14
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 AG
    It's often said that it's best to err on the side of caution.
    johnD wrote: »
    I have never heard of any ill effects from corrosion x. Even antique gun collectors swear by it.

    Having cautioned about WD40 attacking certain plastics used on some antique fishing reels & the danger associated with soaking in solvent based lubricants - I "swear by" careful testing 1st.

    Certain modern fishing reels have printed labels stuck on them. The printing & adhesives used on these labels can be especially vulnerable.
  • territunaterrituna Posts: 57 Greenhorn
    Try using Pledge. Spray let sit then spray again and use toothbrush. Works well and is easy on the reel.
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