Help, new to saltwater fly fishing

aaronaaron Posts: 79 Deckhand
Ive fished for trout/ reds/ snook with spinning gear for a while now, but I want to try fly fishing for them. I have a 6 wt, 9 ft white river with a cabellas reel, and Im not sure if the rod is heavy enough. I also am not sure what are the best flies to use, but from the posts ive seen, I have a bit of an idea. I also am curious about where to go, can i go to any flat where Id normally catch fish?
Any info helps.
Thanks, Aaron

Here are some photos of the set up I have

Replies

  • aaronaaron Posts: 79 Deckhand
    The reel is *orvis not cabellas, my bad
  • redheadredhead Posts: 120 Officer
    That set up could be a little on the light side. For winter time fish on the open flats it will be ok but I wouldn't fish near docks or mangroves. An 8wt is a better all around choice. Any place you normally fish is a good place. If they will eat a lure or bait you can probably get em to eat a fly. I fish just north of you around tampa by kayak. Pm if you are ever up this way.
  • aaronaaron Posts: 79 Deckhand
    Thanks, and will do! Is a 6 wt big enough for beach snook?
  • redheadredhead Posts: 120 Officer
    Probably too light for the beach bruisers. Save it for the flats.
  • razorreilly09razorreilly09 Posts: 8,401 Officer
    Not trying to be rude or put down your gear, but that reel won't last long with frequent salt water use and the abuse the fish will out on it.
    I'd invest in a saltwater rated setup and save that one for the fresh water
  • catch itcatch it Posts: 136 Officer
    6wt is perfect for the beach...if the weather will allow it. The fish have nowhere to go...no snags...nothing but sand. That said, your reel will suffer. The beach is hard on gear.
  • sunflowersunflower Posts: 436 Deckhand
    You ask a good question ...

    One of the tricky things about fly fishing is that the "normal" flats where you use spinning gear won't work for fly fishing. There are some designated flats in each region specified as "fly flats." The fish on these flats have gone through special training. They are schooled in "fly recognition," so they will eat tangles of feathers splashed through the water. They have also had some special fighting training that enables them to time their runs to moments when you are out-of-position (with your fly line wrapped around your reel, the trolling motor, or under your feet). They also have a special diet, that makes them unsuitable for eating, but perfect for kissing admiring, photographing, and releasing. Finally, they have the ability to inhale and shrink right as you photograph them, to make them look much smaller than in reality.

    You will find these flats designated on your fishing maps with little hearts.

    Just joking.
    Mark

    grace finds goodness in everything ...



  • Red-ManRed-Man Posts: 331 Deckhand
    Haha, funny you should say that. My first red on fly looked really small in the pictures...probably cause he was only 18" lol. I couldn't have been more proud though.

    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
  • aaronaaron Posts: 79 Deckhand
    Not trying to be rude or put down your gear, but that reel won't last long with frequent salt water use and the abuse the fish will out on it.
    I'd invest in a saltwater rated setup and save that one for the fresh water

    I probably will get an 8wt saltwater set up eventually, but for now this is all I have and Im gonna have to make it work.

    Thanks everyone for the help, and thanks for the laugh sunflower, haha
  • catch itcatch it Posts: 136 Officer
    Dunk and lube. Reel-x is your friend.
  • ElkchaserElkchaser Posts: 180 Deckhand
    Use it, You'll know soon enough if you are undergunned:fishing
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