Interesting Article about the Camera and the Smartphone Industries

BillgranBillgran Posts: 341 Deckhand
I don't agree with everything in this article but it does make some good points about the masses and snapshots and how the inexpensive consumer cameras are doing.

Click on the link:


http://www.nbcnews.com/technology/were-taking-more-pictures-ever-so-why-are-cameras-dying-6C10607491





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"There is never just one thing wrong with a boat"
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Replies

  • WaterEngineerWaterEngineer Posts: 24,414 AG
    A few thoughts:

    1. The best camera is the one you have with you. For the masses, that means a phone.

    2. For the masses, a "photograph" means posting to the bloggoshperes of instagram, twitter and facebook. That means smooth and easy WiFi connectivity. Proper cameras were about three years late to this game, just now starting to get into the action. We have seen the first few attempts at WiFi cameras from Samsung, Nikon and I believe Oly.

    3. For the masses, carrying a camera means carrying a second device.

    4. We will see major camera makers playing in the smartphone space, albeit, most likely in a supplier role and not direct to consumer. Example, Nikon recently (and finally) coyly announced they will be playing in the phone space very soon. It is anticipated that means they will provide camera modules and lenses to smartphone makers. Another example is Zeiss is supplying plastic lenses for smartphones now.

    5. The recent release of the new Nokia phone with the reputed 41 Mpix camera is not even close to correct. They are counting each of the three colors which are captured on a separate silicone layer as a pixel. This is similar to the Foven technology used in Sigma cameras. The truth is divide 41 by three and for an apples to apples comparison the better way of thinking about it is the new Nokia is a 13Mpix camera which is plenty.

    6. On an even more technical note, the pixel pitch of the photosites on that tiny image sensor is 1.1 nanometers. For comparison, take the sensor in the Nikon D300s which is 12 Mpix (12, 13 those are comparable). The pixel pitch (diameter) on the Sony sensor in the Nikon camera is 1.6 nanometers. That is over a 100-percent area increase in light gathering area on a per pixel basis. What this means is that with all other things being equal the light gather ability of the Sony sensor is tremendously better.

    7. Some of the first images from the Nokia phone have been posted and the images look terrible, terrible. Some of the issue can be address by improvements with the software, but some of the problem is the limitation of the physics of the small sensor (please see #6.) Bottomline, a phone in your pocket cannot compete with a proper camera - not even close.

    8. I recently read a report about the number of photos being posted each day and the storage requirements for such. I do not recall the details but it went something like this. There were more photos taken in 2012 that in the history of photography. Growth is expected to be exponential.

    9. Media outlets are not helping the overall situation with their cost cutting measures. It seems that news agencies and TV are now depending on citizen reporters and photos/video. I will be so bold as to say we have all seen crappy cameraphone video and images on the nightly news - quality has really gone downhill. Their use has proliferated. Everytime I see this material being used I think the station or agency should be embarrassed. One of the TV stations in West Palm Beach actively requests photos and video. Heck you even see it on national news now, when previously it was just for "covert" type reporting from crossing into some territory where the reporter wasn't suppose to be. An other example is the recent announcement by the Chicago paper that their entire photo journalism department, with the exception of one person, was released and that they gave their beat reporters iPhones and "training." Rhetorically, shouldn't a reported be focused on asking questions and gathering info, while a proper photojournalist focuses on telling a story in images?

    I could go on. Points not even touched are what is print advertising doing, what is the role of photography in story telling, fine art photography, digital displays and many other topics.

    I appreciate your OP. I believe the bottom line is for many uses a high quality image is no longer needed or even expected, which is sad. Furthermore, once upon a time taking a photo was an event that few had the knowledge to execute and the photo was treasured, hung on the wall. Now a whole gallery of photos fits in your pocket.
    Which ever one(s) of you little boys complained about quotes in the signature should be ashamed of yourself. :blowkiss

    Instead of complaining to the moderators you should just quit playing on this board.
  • mississippi macmississippi mac Posts: 4,222 Captain
    Craig....

    this statement by you is spot on....
    everybody with a camera thinks they are an artist...

    by WE....

    I appreciate your OP. I believe the bottom line is for many uses a high quality image is no longer needed or even expected, which is sad. Furthermore, once upon a time taking a photo was an event that few had the knowledge to execute and the photo was tresured, hung on the wall. Now a whole gallery of photos fits in your pocket.


    tim
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    The Real White Dog

    if you can't catch a fish...catch a buzz....
    #12976, joined 8-17-2002
  • WaterEngineerWaterEngineer Posts: 24,414 AG
    Interestingly, and on point this article was posted on CNN today. >>>> http://www.cnn.com/2013/06/28/living/wedding-photography-unplugged/?iref=obnetwork
    Which ever one(s) of you little boys complained about quotes in the signature should be ashamed of yourself. :blowkiss

    Instead of complaining to the moderators you should just quit playing on this board.
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