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FWC bass open house

Looks like the FWC is having open house discussions in our region reguarding bass.

They will be in Ocala March 18th at Gander mt. and on the 19th in Gainesville at Garys Tackle box

There is an online survey for any of you that fish the freshwater.

http://myfwc.com/fishing/freshwater/black-bass/bass-regulations/

Here is another link to the letter sent out by FWC

http://forums.floridasportsman.com/showthread.php?100103-FWC-Reviewing-Bass-Regs
"You'll get your weather"

Replies

  • Fishin RodFishin Rod Posts: 2,620 Captain
    I catch bass, but I eat bass, which disqualifies me from being a "bass fisherman"........
    "Be what you is"....... Isaiah Minter
  • capt louiecapt louie Posts: 10,850 Moderator
    Fishin Rod wrote: »
    I catch bass, but I eat bass, which disqualifies me from being a "bass fisherman"........


    Nuttin' wrong with that. They are just asking for input. They are , afterall , only fish.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • Jim311Jim311 Posts: 4,961 Captain
    Fishin Rod wrote: »
    I catch bass, but I eat bass, which disqualifies me from being a "bass fisherman"........


    I would disagree with you sir! In my opinion more people need to be eating bass, especially the smaller ones, which I think taste better anyway. Too many lakes are chock full of struggling fish and I think that's because a lot of bass fishermen have this mentality that to take a fish is to damage the fishery but it just isn't the case. Anyway, I've really got no qualms about the rules as they stand. This is a great state to bass fish in.
  • Austins26Austins26 Posts: 1,921 Captain
    agreed nothing wrong with keeping smaller fish 1-2-3lbs bigger fish don't taste good anyway

    i'm too lazy an never prepared to keep fish havn't kept a bass in 23yrs (showin my age)
    Jim311 wrote: »
    I would disagree with you sir! In my opinion more people need to be eating bass, especially the smaller ones, which I think taste better anyway. Too many lakes are chock full of struggling fish and I think that's because a lot of bass fishermen have this mentality that to take a fish is to damage the fishery but it just isn't the case. Anyway, I've really got no qualms about the rules as they stand. This is a great state to bass fish in.
    The Original HOTD poster
    680k views 360 plus posts Deleted by a so called Mod over a little cleavage

    member since Oct 1998 long before most of You
  • troutman57troutman57 Posts: 3,691 Captain
    Jim311 wrote: »
    I would disagree with you sir! In my opinion more people need to be eating bass, especially the smaller ones, which I think taste better anyway. Too many lakes are chock full of struggling fish and I think that's because a lot of bass fishermen have this mentality that to take a fish is to damage the fishery but it just isn't the case. Anyway, I've really got no qualms about the rules as they stand. This is a great state to bass fish in.

    I agree with that totally. Many fisheries benefit from thining out smaller fish and releasing the larger breeding fish. I fished a walleye lake in Ontario that became over run with small walleye over the time I fished it from the 70's through the mid 80's. They imposed a no release slot limit and the last time I went there in 94 the larger fish were more prevailent. The other side of that coin is nature usually does it best all by it self .
    This place Rocks if yer a crabber
  • Austins26Austins26 Posts: 1,921 Captain
    I'm not a biologist although an I have no research to proof the smaller fish over runnig a lake or pond hense preventing larger fish from becoming Huge fish:stinkfish

    the fact is Bass eat other Bass :banghead

    so in my book the over run theory don't hold H2O with me but I ain't all dat brite anyway :shrug
    The Original HOTD poster
    680k views 360 plus posts Deleted by a so called Mod over a little cleavage

    member since Oct 1998 long before most of You
  • capt louiecapt louie Posts: 10,850 Moderator
    I believe it depends on the size of the water. Small ponds will indeed get over run by bass/bluegill and they will stunt due to lack of food.
    As stated in another thread , the amount of fish that need to be removed from ponds and smaller waters is way more than you would think to maintain a healthy fishery.

    "When bass are over harvested, the pond becomes overpopulated with stunted bluegill. If this happens, it is difficult to restore the balance of predator (bass) and prey (bluegill) in the pond. It may be necessary to poison the fish and start again. As a general rule, fertile ponds can sustain an annual harvest of 25-35 pounds of bass per acre. If the pond is infertile, you should not remove more than 10-15 pounds of bass per acre. Do not begin bass fishing in a new pond before bass spawn in the spring, when the water is above 60° F. By practicing catch and release with the bass, you can enjoy successful angling more often. Bluegill should be harvested also. A good general rule is to remove 10-15 bluegill for each bass taken or four pounds of bluegill for each pound of bass."

    That is from Clemson university http://www.clemson.edu/extension/natural_resources/wildlife/publications/fs19_managing_farm_ponds.html

    Different than large bodies of water where maintaining a balanced age class of fish is important. That's what FWC tries to manage for.
    "You'll get your weather"
  • troutman57troutman57 Posts: 3,691 Captain
    Thats great info Louie......Let nature take it's course as it has for billions of years.
    This place Rocks if yer a crabber
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