ARS: We are not alone

harbisonharbison Posts: 3,435 Captain
We in Florida are not alone:

LOUISIANA BUTTS HEADS OVER RED SNAPPER REGS
At its February meeting, the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council rejected a proposal by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries that would provide harvest accountability and allow Louisiana's recreational fishermen to choose their own season dates for recreational red snapper. "It's obvious when looking at recreational landings of red snapper for the Gulf of Mexico," said head of Fisheries for Louisiana, LDWF Assistant Secretary Randy Pausina, "that the current federal system of controlling recreational harvest isn't working. For the past six years the recreational quota was exceeded five times. The only year the quota wasn't exceeded was in 2010, likely a direct result of massive fishery closures resulting from the BP oil spill. Overages ran from a low of 19 percent to a high of 89 percent in those six years and exceeded 7 million pounds of red snapper which is almost twice the current recreational quota."

"Our proposal for regional management would have allowed Louisiana to manage its recreational fishery by closing the red snapper season when our allocation of fish was harvested. In turn, the Gulf Council would allow Louisiana recreational fishermen through the Wildlife and Fisheries Commission process to set the red snapper season dates and daily bag limits," added Pausina.
Here comes Crabtree:
In related action, the Gulf Council gave the Regional Director of NOAA the authority to close federal waters (EEZ) beyond those states that are determined to be non-compliant with federal regulations.

89 % overages...Only in NOAA land. Only with EDF, backed by Pew, data. King NOAA will manipulate data, as needed, to 'prove' the need for shares/separation. Texas was the first to tell the feds what they can do with their so called 'scientific-data'. Then Louisiana & Florida. Regardless of what Mississippi & Alabama does, the majority of gulf states have shown a strong vote of NO CONFIDENCE in NOAA to manage our fisheries."
"It's obvious when looking at recreational landings of red snapper for the Gulf of Mexico," said head of Fisheries for Louisiana, LDWF Assistant Secretary Randy Pausina, "that the current federal system of controlling recreational harvest isn't working."
Florida agrees:



Commission proposes 2013 Gulf recreational red snapper season in state waters

News Release
Wednesday, February 13, 2013
Media contact: Amanda Nalley, 850-410-4943

(Back to Commission meeting news)
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) proposed a 44-day recreational red snapper season for Gulf of Mexico state waters at its meeting Feb. 13 in Orlando.
This season would start June 1 and end July 14. The proposed 2013 season is inconsistent with the current proposed federal season, which is currently expected to be about 27 days but may be shortened once state seasons in all Gulf state waters are finalized.
The Commission will make a final decision on this season at the April Commission meeting in Tallahassee.
While the federal limit for how many pounds of red snapper can be caught has increased, the season length has gotten shorter because of more fishing effort and larger fish, according to federal fishery managers.
After listening to public comment, the Commission chose to go inconsistent based on reports that the upcoming federal stock assessment would likely show red snapper populations are doing better than previously thought and reports from anglers that the fishery is improving and preference is to have a longer season.
The Commission also gave direction to FWC staff to look further into other long-term management options for red snapper.
For more on the proposal that was given to the Commission, visit MyFWC.com/Commission.

Replies

  • Tom HiltonTom Hilton Posts: 1,582 Captain
    Let's see - a state submits a proposal to provide their own accountability measures and to shut down fishing when their state water quota has been met and it is turned down.

    So much for the feds wanting true accountability - it's REALLY not about that is it? It's about implementing a predetermined "new" way of managing our fish - one laid out by the Environmental Defense Fund 6 years ago.

    It's going to be interesting to sse the creative logic they use to justify implementing catch shares in the federal EEZ when there is no federal EEZ season due to the Gulf states "non-compliance".

    What is becoming crystal clear is that it shouldn't matter where the fish are caught offshore - they should be accounted for when they are landed in that state's ports - regional management by the states WITHOUT federal meddling or interference. No need for 30B, catch shares, days at sea, or any such BS.

    Capt. Thomas J. Hilton
  • Docked WagesDocked Wages Posts: 2,906 Admin
    Have they seen the massive Red Snapper kills by the feds blowing up rigs in the Gulf of Mexico?

    http://www.local15tv.com/news/local/story/Explosive-Fed-Mandate-Killing-Thousands-of-Red/xj8T4zPamkOGc8fuT40W_Q.cspx



    Explosive Fed. Mandate Killing Thousands of Red Snapper

    MOBILE, Ala. (WPMI) A federal mandate to remove old, abandoned oil and gas rigs in the Gulf of Mexico is blowing up a lot more than just the rigs.

    Undercover video obtained by Local 15 shows thousands of pounds of dead fish, mostly red snapper, floating to the surface after one of the controversial demolitions in the Gulf.

    “Good Lord,” marine scientist Dr. Bob Shipp said, when Local 15 showed him the video. “As a scientist, I think it’s abominable.”

    Shipp said the demolitions are frequent, sometimes three a week in the Gulf, but are seldom video-taped. Shipp also sits on the Gulf Fisheries Management Council, and has been a strong opponent of the demolitions.

    “It’s a double whammy,” Shipp said, “Not only are we killing a lot of snapper, but we’re also destroying their habitat.”

    The old rigs are an eye-sore, but under the surface, they’ve developed into artificial reefs with rich coral habitats. On some of the older rigs, those habitats have grown over the course of 30 to 40 years.

    The killing of the red snapper is also infuriating charter boat captains and anglers. Federal restrictions keep cutting the red snapper season shorter and quotas smaller to protect the species from over-fishing.

    “They tell us not to fish [red snapper] but they’re blowing them up,” charter boat Captain Jason Domange told Local 15, “It’s a cryin’ shame.”

    The confidential source who provided Local 15 the video estimated 10,000 pounds of fish, mostly red snapper, were killed after that one demolition.

    ”That’s a year’s salary for a lot of people and that’s just going to waste,” Domange said.

    Dr. Shipp said the killing of red snapper has both environmental and economical ramifications.

    "We're talking about the most valuable fish species in the Gulf of Mexico, the one on which so much tourism, industry and restaurants depend," Shipp said, "Then we see something like this, which is just a blatant waste of a very precious resource."

    Before Domange was a charter boat captain, he worked on oil and gas rigs all across the Gulf Coast. He’s seen plenty of demolitions and fish kills, but has never seen one on video-tape.

    “A lot of [the demolitions were] hush hush, unsaid, and unseen,” Domange said, “This is the first video that’s been produced, that I’ve seen. Hopefully it shines a lot of light.”
    Mark P. Wilson
    Marine Surveyor, SAMS-SA, ABYC
    Wilson Yacht Survey, Inc
    Old Bahama Bay (Owner / Board of Directors) 



  • Capt BloodCapt Blood Posts: 184 Officer
    Have they seen the massive Red Snapper kills by the feds blowing up rigs in the Gulf of Mexico?

    “Good Lord,” marine scientist Dr. Bob Shipp said, when Local 15 showed him the video. “As a scientist, I think it’s abominable.”

    Shameful that Shipp is blaming dumb on this, he knows the details. Re-posting those at the bottom, from another thread...
    At its February meeting, the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Management Council rejected a proposal by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries that would provide harvest accountability and allow Louisiana's recreational fishermen to choose their own season dates for recreational red snapper.

    This is almost verbatim from an LDWF press release that was totally misleading. The Council unanimously rejected Louisiana's proposal, meaning even Doug Boyd and with CCA Texas voted against it. LDWF were the only ones voting for regional management because the plan was a hack piece o' **** that they didn't take the time to develop into something which would address everyone else's concerns. Louisiana is the one at fault, they're making a fish grab with their crazy 80 days (and weekend days with higher effort) for red snapper and claiming it's accountable. Funny how that coincides with the State's most celebrated corrupt politician Edwin Edwards being released from prison...spin and corruption are alive and well in Louisiana.
    "...forced to become a pirate not for infamy and riches, but out of a rankling sense of injustice by the government leaders who have forsaken him..." -Rafael Sabatini-
  • Capt BloodCapt Blood Posts: 184 Officer
    Capt Blood wrote: »
    Shameful that Shipp is blaming dumb on this, he knows the details. Re-posting those at the bottom, from another thread...

    Saw a presentation by Apache Oil at the last Sport Fish and Boating Partnership Council Meeting. Was surprised to hear them say they didn't want a moratorium on rig removal. They said it costs a ton to keep em painted and apply zinc anodes and they essentially are like any other mechanical thing, they have a useful life and need to be decommissioned. Ted Venker with CCA was there.

    There are hydraulic shears that can be used to cut the rigs and avoid the snapper deaths cause by explosives but not surprising explosives are cheaper. The issue of cutting them off well below the water line was brought up but if memory serves it was the liability issues that still remain for the oil companies and that it's even harder (costly) to service the remaining structure with anodes. Bottom line, the remaining structure will eventually fail and when it does the company would be liable if it affected natural habitat or got moved by waves or surge and some other mishap (i.e. vessel strike) happened.

    Apache noted if they could get granted sites within 3-5 miles of a rig to anchor the structure to the bottom, they could make artificial reefs, anything further than that it was more cost effective to haul the old rig to shore and sell it for scrap. Of course the cost of hydraulic shears would likely move things toward all rigs coming to shore for scrap to recover as much of the cost as possible.

    I was surprised by where the oil companies stood on the removals, issue was pretty darn complicated as they dug into the weeds on it.
    "...forced to become a pirate not for infamy and riches, but out of a rankling sense of injustice by the government leaders who have forsaken him..." -Rafael Sabatini-
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