FWC and red snapper

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  • harbisonharbison Posts: 2,964 Captain
    Captain Gary S. Coleccio: "It is a stance Florida has been long overdue in taking."
    Thank you Captain. No one could have said it any better.

    It's about time that the FWC looks out for the people of Florida rather than follow the money trail. Look for Alabama & Mississippi to follow. Talk about a slap in the face to Crabtree's Gulf Council. It's about time:
    FWC to NMFS- More snapper = More days. 44 to be exact.


    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission meeting in Orlando yesterday produced some interesting results. Regarding red snapper in state waters, the FWC expressed their concerns which mirrored those of other states over the true health and picture of the red snapper stock in the Gulf of Mexico. The FWC took a seriously unexpected step in declaring that state waters will be open for 44 days for red snapper starting June 1 this year. Their logic was simple: Last year, we had a 40 day season; red snapper are unanimously agreed to be more abundant this year; therefore, we should have a LONGER season than last year.


    This decision reflects the FWC's total frustration with the federal management of our red snapper stocks. The decision has grave impacts on federally permitted charter fishermen. Under the current laws, which were dreamed up and put in place by the National Marine Fisheries Service, a federally permitted charter boat operator may not fish in state waters if federal waters are close. This incredibly arrogant control of state waters by a federal appointed official appeared to be the straw that broke the camel's back with the FWC. The ball is now in NMFS' court. To say NMFS is embarrassed is an understatement. Congress will be appalled, once again. Perhaps a trip to the woodshed would affect the direction of future federal management actions.


    The Fishing Rights Alliance thinks that these federal permit holders may have grounds for a class action lawsuit against National Marine Fisheries Service. In all likelihood, if Louisiana and Florida do not change their state water openings, the National Marine Fisheries Service will not even open red snapper to recreational anglers in Gulf federal waters in 2013. That would restrict federal permit holders to no red snapper fishing whatsoever. That is both a travesty and an outrage. The FRA will attempt to organize those who are interested into a focus group to explore with legal counsel what options are available for relief. This in no way should imply that there is any legal remedy at this point. The affected parties' legal remedies will only be discussed and explored with attorneys. Interested, affected parties should email [email protected] with your contact information. The anglers unable to fish in federal waters, whether from a professional captain's boat or one's own boat, are also affected. Stay tuned for information regarding our remedies.


    This decision could, for the short term, hurt most of Florida. It must be remembered that South of the Florida Panhandle there is simply NO red snapper in state waters. However, the long term possibilities are tremendous. The days of NOAA LAW, the days of EDF & Pew influence, and the days of Roy Crabtree's "We are giving the recreational fisherman too many days to fish for ARS" are coming to an end. The voice of the American Peoples have been, are, and will continue to be heard.

    Bob Harbison
  • EggsuckindogEggsuckindog Posts: 1,528 Officer
    Long Gone wrote: »
    Been boarded by FWC many times outside 50 miles. Once we were 95 miles from land and boarded by FWC at daybreak in 3 to 4s. (no violations).

    Yep, this was the goodie/bribe to buy them this really really big boat to patrol offshore when the grouper closures kicked in, as most of their boats weren't really big enough. I think they have 2 now that can patrol out there, I see them every year at Gasparilla.
    1976 SeaCraft master Angler - Merc 200 XRi
    dscf1243-1.jpg
  • From FRA:

    FWC to NMFS- More snapper = More days. 44 to be exact.


    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission meeting in Orlando yesterday produced some interesting results. Regarding red snapper in state waters, the FWC expressed their concerns which mirrored those of other states over the true health and picture of the red snapper stock in the Gulf of Mexico. The FWC took a seriously unexpected step in declaring that state waters will be open for 44 days for red snapper starting June 1 this year. Their logic was simple: Last year, we had a 40 day season; red snapper are unanimously agreed to be more abundant this year; therefore, we should have a LONGER season than last year.


    This decision reflects the FWC's total frustration with the federal management of our red snapper stocks. The decision has grave impacts on federally permitted charter fishermen. Under the current laws, which were dreamed up and put in place by the National Marine Fisheries Service, a federally permitted charter boat operator may not fish in state waters if federal waters are close. This incredibly arrogant control of state waters by a federal appointed official appeared to be the straw that broke the camel's back with the FWC. The ball is now in NMFS' court. To say NMFS is embarrassed is an understatement. Congress will be appalled, once again. Perhaps a trip to the woodshed would affect the direction of future federal management actions.


    The Fishing Rights Alliance thinks that these federal permit holders may have grounds for a class action lawsuit against National Marine Fisheries Service. In all likelihood, if Louisiana and Florida do not change their state water openings, the National Marine Fisheries Service will not even open red snapper to recreational anglers in Gulf federal waters in 2013. That would restrict federal permit holders to no red snapper fishing whatsoever. That is both a travesty and an outrage. The FRA will attempt to organize those who are interested into a focus group to explore with legal counsel what options are available for relief. This in no way should imply that there is any legal remedy at this point. The affected parties' legal remedies will only be discussed and explored with attorneys. Interested, affected parties should email
    [email protected] with your contact information. The anglers unable to fish in federal waters, whether from a professional captain's boat or one's own boat, are also affected. Stay tuned for information regarding our remedie
    "If I can't win, I won't play." - Doris Colecchio.

    "Well Gary, the easiest way to look tall is to stand in a room full of short people." - Curtis Bostick

    "All these forums, with barely any activity, are like a neglected old cemetery that no one visits anymore."- anonymouse
  • mustang190mustang190 Posts: 10,104 AG
    Looks like the feds have no problem killing all the red snapper they want.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_LzCSGDqWY&feature=share
    2013 Pathfinder 22 TE , 150 Yamaha,
  • harbisonharbison Posts: 2,964 Captain
    The voice of the people:
    I fish the Florida Middle Grounds. The Grounds is covered with red snapper. I have really been looking forward to ARS season. With Florida going non-compliant, Mississippi & Alabama will probably follow. This would mean all five gulf states have shown NO confidence in NOAA's Gulf Council, and are ready to do something about it. Even if a defiant Crabtree does close federal waters to red snapper fishing, it's a move that had to be done. With a shorter & shorter ARS season each year it's just a matter of time until we would have NO season anyway. The 28 day 2013 season is a slap in the face to the saltwater fishing community. If our sport is to continue, NOAA's grip must be broken. Florida has taken a very bold step towards breaking the strangle hole NOAA holds over every costal state. Let the Northern Counties have their ARS. We have our grouper.
    'The voice of the people' has been & will continue to be heard.
    To prosper, both fish & fisherman must have, and abide by, very strict regulations. However, we the people must demand that these regulations be based on modern up-to-date data, data from real on the water science, not data manipulated to show the need for shares/separation.
    If NOAA, Crabtree, the Gulf Council refuse to become part of the solution, rather than part of the problem, they can and must be replaced. 'The voice of the people' has been and will continue to be heard. Bob Harbison
  • Riptide31Riptide31 Posts: 474 Deckhand
    Right on, Bob. FWC should be commended; I might be on their blocked email list since all I've sent in the past are nasty-grams. But they deserved them.
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