Flamingo / White Water Bay questions....

I'm doing a little pre-planning for a first time trip to the Flamingo area. Thinking of making it a camping/fishing excursion. Would like to camp in Whitewater Bay at the S. Joe River Chickee. That chickee seems to be the closest and easiest to get to.We would have to register for the chickee the day we enter the park, correct? We will most likely fish out front when we get there, then head back to WW Bay. Would the Buttonwoon Canal be the way to go? On the chart it looks to be, but on google maps it seems there is an obstruction. At the launch/marina area of the canal it looks like thre is a boat basin or something with seawalls in the way. Maybe I'm seeing something that isn't there.....I hope.

Thanks.

Replies

  • Bush WhackerBush Whacker Posts: 135 Officer
    Looking at GG maps again, there seems to be two ramp areas. One to get outside and another for the canal. Is this correct?
  • lowe-boylowe-boy Posts: 1,217 Officer
    Joe River and Oyster bay are your best bets as a newbie. I think you have to register in advance for the chickees. Check with the park.
    The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.
  • Spotsgonefishn'Spotsgonefishn' Posts: 225 Officer
    Yes, there is a ramp on both sides of the plug.
    "From man's sweat and God's love, beer came into the world." -St Arnold of Metz
  • lowe-boylowe-boy Posts: 1,217 Officer
    Becareful with the lady with one eye, she will take your money ......
    The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 3,097 Captain
    Here's the first stop to make on the 'net if you're planning a trip to the 'Glades...
    http://www.nps.gov/ever/planyourvisit/index.htm.

    For fishing you'll want to decide whether to fish "outside" (Florida Bay down toward the Keys) or "inside" Whitewater and Oyster Bays then all the rivers that drain into the west coast of the 'Glades. If it's Florida Bay, the campground at Flamingo is your best bet for a first trip. If it's inside then you'll have a variety of campsites to choose from (but inside you're only allowed to stay one night at each interior campsite...). The interior campsites (along with every other small campsite in the Park show clearly on marine charts.... Here are the two I use the most...
    http://www.charts.noaa.gov/OnLineViewer/11433.shtml
    http://www.charts.noaa.gov/OnLineViewer/11432.shtml

    Yes, you'll have to sign up at the Visitor Center the day you come into the Park for any campsites you want (not sure of the fees but have heard they're modest). The tough part about the Visitor Center is that it won't be opening as early as most would like so you have to plan your arrival at the Park that first day to coincide with their hours instead of yours..

    Yes, there are two boat ramps at Flamingo and the plug at the end of Buttonwood Canal is why you need one ramp or the other. I occasionally get there super early, load up on bait on the outside - then come back to Flamingo, haul out and re-launch on the inside ramp when I need bait for my anglers, but most will simply launch on one side or the other then spend the day on that side. Buttonwood canal is exactly three miles long, then you're in **** Bay, and on the northwestern side of **** is the entrance to Tarpon Creek which takes you to Whitewater... Only one set of markers in the interior and once you leave them it all looks the same.....

    Do not go into the interior unless your rig is 100%.... Years ago it was standard to go two boats at a time when learning that area... Not bad advice.
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • hittin'_bottomhittin'_bottom Posts: 178 Officer
    Go to Chokoloskee, the fishing is better and the people are nicer. There are no fish in Flamingo.




    Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk 2
    I've upped my standards, now up yours!!!
  • Bush WhackerBush Whacker Posts: 135 Officer
    Thanks for the help everyone.

    Bob, thanks for the links. The noaa map is how I found the Joes Creek chickee. We will definetly make sure our boat is 100%. It doesn't seem to difficult to navigate fom the mouth of Tarpon Creek to the chickee, though I am looking at it from a birds eye view. And I do know how one grove shorline can look like them all.

    So would a good plan for a 'mingo noob wanting to fish Whitewater, to be within bino sight of the marked channel. We will have a GPS, but may not have a nav-chip for the area.
  • Pucker FactorPucker Factor Posts: 875 Officer
    Marshall!!! There are no fish in Chokoloskee either.

    Bob, spot on with the advice as usual. The campground suggestion and the part about making sure that your rig is 100% are highlighted items. There is a lot less planning and stuff that has to be brought since there is fuel at the marina storeand other items. If this is the first trip, get to know the place first and then consider other trips in the future to the platforms.

    South Joe River to me is a waste of time, but is a good back up if Ralph beats you to signing up for the Oyster Bay platform. We have a game in Choko, called Beat Kenny. In Flamingo, we have Beat Ralph. ;)
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 3,097 Captain
    Yes, the Oyster Bay chickee is the most convenient - but either the Joe River chickee (just a moment from Mud Bay and the south end of Oyster Bay) or the Watson River chickee back inside Whitewater are equally convenient (You'll see the smallest amount of boat traffic at the Watson River chickee).

    If you don't have a nav chip on your gps just learn to mark a waypoint at every major turning point in your trip out (for sure one at the mouth of Tarpon Creek since you have to find it to be able to get back to Flamingo from the interior) and maybe the last marker in each Bay (say marker 40 as M40 for the end of the Whitewater markers and M53 for the last of the Oyster Bay markers) and of course your night's campsite. Getting a bit lost from time to time is entirely acceptable as long as you have a few "anchor waypoints" that you've loaded while on your trip. Sure is nice to know that you can return to a known spot if you're lost.... The last (and maybe most important consideration) with a gps is to zero out your trip log before your leave the dock. A quick check of your trip log is really handy when you try to figure out how much territory you've covered, how much fuel you have left, and that all important remainder to get you back to Flamingo (wish I had a nickel for every load of folks who've flagged me down over the years to ask.. "Which way is Flamingo?" and then the all important "I only have x amount of gas left.... do you think we'll make it?"
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • Black MaverickBlack Maverick Posts: 104 Officer
    We are doing a camping trip next weekend to Flamingo (actually an RV trip after 30+ knot winds in a tent last year, plus its college football championship weekend...thank god for Sling Box). It will be our 3rd year, and is now a tradition the weekend after Thanksgiving weekend, as my buddy's a big duck hunter and its in between duck seasons. Anyway, if youve never been and dont have the chip, there is plenty to do by fishing full days and heading back to Flamingo for a hot shower, ships store, fuel, good campsites, and not having to bring everything in the world with you on your boat to sleep on a platform. Plus, its first come first serve, so you may be SOL with your first choice of campsite, and if you dont know the area, you are left scrambling to find the next best chickee that you do not have on uour chartplotter...easy way to ruin your trip and turn you off from a great area. My advice would be to drive down, get a campsite at Flamingo, fish on either side day one with all your camping stuff left in your truck, get back before sunset & pitch your tent, shower, BBQ, campfire, beers, sleep, wake up, fish the opposite side from the day before, and start loading your GPS & paper charts with your log info and just get more and more comfortable with the area until you can feel comfortable that you have the local mnowledge and all the things you will need to make a trip to the chickees a much less stressful trip. Once you've been there once or twice, alot of your ?'s will be answered and you can move on to more adventurous and more successful trips down the road.
  • lemaymiamilemaymiami Posts: 3,097 Captain
    Black, that's some solid, practical advice....
    Tight Lines
    Bob LeMay
    (954) 435-5666
  • heavychevy15heavychevy15 Posts: 837 Officer
    lowe-boy wrote: »
    Becareful with the lady with one eye, she will take your money ......

    Funny but messed up !
  • OxenOxen Posts: 130 Officer
    lowe-boy wrote: »
    Becareful with the lady with one eye, she will take your money ......

    lol
  • HialeahAnglerHialeahAngler Posts: 9,612 Admiral
    Go to Chokoloskee, the fishing is better and the people are nicer. There are no fish in Flamingo.




    Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk 2

    wise words from a wise cherna.
    friedpeacocks.jpg
  • Bush WhackerBush Whacker Posts: 135 Officer
    lemaymiami wrote: »
    Black, that's some solid, practical advice....

    Agreed.

    Thanks Black.
  • hittin'_bottomhittin'_bottom Posts: 178 Officer
    wise words from a wise cherna.

    Tu novio es el cherna, bugarronson!




    Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk 2
    I've upped my standards, now up yours!!!
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