Anyone Collect Antique Reels?

Been collecting & restoring antique fishing reels for over a decade. Started with open spinning reels, especially old French half bail models & expanded into classic deep sea reels.

Enjoy the old Pflueger, Ocean City & early Penn 'Knuckle Busters'.

Always looking for more neglected, abandoned & orphaned antique reels to salvage. What have you got?

Replies

  • hossmosshossmoss Posts: 1,193 Officer
    I have a few Pflueger, Ocean City and others that belonged to my grandfather, Have an old 12/0 senator with braided "silk". It still has the service and claim tag from when he had it serviced and spooled back in 1950. He died in 1951.

    CHEAP BAIT! Try our NE FL Bait Co-op: www.neflbaitco-op.com

    2013 Cape Horn 31T with twin Yamaha F300s

  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 Officer
    Any idea how old the Penn 12/0 Senator is?
    hossmoss wrote: »
    I have a few Pflueger, Ocean City and others that belonged to my grandfather, Have an old 12/0 senator with braided "silk". It still has the service and claim tag from when he had it serviced and spooled back in 1950. He died in 1951.

    Stumbled upon a very early 9/0 Senator on a classic, falling apart, split Bambo, deep sea rod at a yard sale for $10! Did not realize until later that the oldest Senators are dramatically different from all the post WW2 Senators almost everybody thinks of as old.

    Earliest Senators weren't made using the common chrome plated brass, like ~99% of the old Penn classics normally seen. They were made of much tougher German silver, albeit poorly plated.

    Earliest Senator logos also merely said Senator on the head plate. No 'ought' designation. No model number.

    Earliest Senators also had Fruitwood knobs & handles with full length counterbalance.

    Earliest Senators also had head plates with crank & freespool lever in different locations.

    Real hard to find. Managed to find a decent 6/0 & a damaged 2/0 in German silver after a lot of looking.

    Penn started phasing out German silver a few years before WW2, but the early brass Senators also lack Part Number stamping. Perhaps 95% of all the old Penn reels you come across have P/N stamping.

    They're so rare & yet so similar, they can hide in plain sight. There's a popular belief that Senators have been the same forever.
  • johnDjohnD WC FLPosts: 6,391 Admiral
    I have a few ,mainly old penns..if you ever get a chance head to Indian Rocks Tackle they have one of the best collections I have ever seen. They also have quite a few old parts.
  • hossmosshossmoss Posts: 1,193 Officer
    Any idea how old the Penn 12/0 Senator is?



    Stumbled upon a very early 9/0 Senator on a classic, falling apart, split Bambo, deep sea rod at a yard sale for $10! Did not realize until later that the oldest Senators are dramatically different from all the post WW2 Senators almost everybody thinks of as old.

    Earliest Senators weren't made using the common chrome plated brass, like ~99% of the old Penn classics normally seen. They were made of much tougher German silver, albeit poorly plated.

    Earliest Senator logos also merely said Senator on the head plate. No 'ought' designation. No model number.

    Earliest Senators also had Fruitwood knobs & handles with full length counterbalance.

    Earliest Senators also had head plates with crank & freespool lever in different locations.

    Real hard to find. Managed to find a decent 6/0 & a damaged 2/0 in German silver after a lot of looking.

    Penn started phasing out German silver a few years before WW2, but the early brass Senators also lack Part Number stamping. Perhaps 95% of all the old Penn reels you come across have P/N stamping.

    They're so rare & yet so similar, they can hide in plain sight. There's a popular belief that Senators have been the same forever.

    I'll have to look at mine and see what it actually has on it.

    CHEAP BAIT! Try our NE FL Bait Co-op: www.neflbaitco-op.com

    2013 Cape Horn 31T with twin Yamaha F300s

  • Lunch Money SurfLunch Money Surf Posts: 1,029 Officer
    I've got a Mitchell 498 that is older than me by four years ('68).

    Bought it mint for a steal, and fabricated a new drag disk out of some Seamaster drag cork that I acquired.

    I use it all the time surf fishing.

    The thing is built like a tank, there's like ten total parts. I can break it down, clean and regrease it, and put it back together in less than an hour.

    I sure wish they still made reels like that. Simple and tough.
  • KaddiKaddi Posts: 54 Deckhand
    I have a Penn 716 greenie, Penn 722 greenie, and an old Jigmaster. I have no idea what year they were made but I figure they are all older than me. I am refurbishing the greenies now and upgrading the Jigmaster with some ss parts as I can.
  • TeamReelDealTeamReelDeal Posts: 5 Greenhorn
    I have several old rods & reels that have been passed down in my family. I'll take some pics & post
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 Officer
    A "mint" Mitchell 498 can be worth a bit to collectors, especially if it came w/box & paper. Some rare versions more than others. May be the best all around Surf Spinning Reel ever made. And the heir to the Mitchell 'King of the Surf' classic SaltWater/302 spinning reels.

    No idea how used it is now, but did you consider picking up a cosmetically challenged 498 to fish?
    I've got a Mitchell 498 that is older than me by four years ('68).

    Bought it mint for a steal, and fabricated a new drag disk out of some Seamaster drag cork that I acquired.

    I use it all the time surf fishing.

    The thing is built like a tank, there's like ten total parts. I can break it down, clean and regrease it, and put it back together in less than an hour.

    I sure wish they still made reels like that. Simple and tough.

    Not familiar w/"Seamaster drag cork" but am surprised you decided to "fabricated a new drag disk". Mitchell 498's original "Ferodo" racing car brake friction material, Teflon discs & drag design was hard to beat & NOS parts can still be found.

    Note these reel's Weak Links are; the plastic 'follower' that oscillates spool & its pins, and the plastic that the drag disc sits on.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 Officer
    Am a fan of Penn Spinfisher 700 & 704 reels. Got a couple of 1st version w/the odd curved 1 piece diecast handles. Rarely fish w/anything smaller, but have a few other "greenies" from 60's.

    Not sure when Penn ended "greenie" paint jobs, but the black, or especially the black & gold, 704 spinning reels are just fine to fish with. Even with the plastic side plates. Have landed a lot of keeper Grouper with these spinning reels & 20 lb line using jigs, to the surprise of many fishing 'livies' on 4/0's & 60 lb line.
    Kaddi wrote: »
    I have a Penn 716 greenie, Penn 722 greenie, and an old Jigmaster. I have no idea what year they were made but I figure they are all older than me. I am refurbishing the greenies now and upgrading the Jigmaster with some ss parts as I can.

    Been looking for Penn "greenie" reels from the era when they got the chintzy stamped & silk screened aluminum side plates.
  • Anclote KeyAnclote Key Posts: 2,354 Officer
    I have these 2 Garcia Mitchell 300's that my dad gave me. I want to restore them and hang on the wall, but i'm not really sure where to start. They need paint and i'm sure new guts also.
    The two best times to fish is when it’s rainin’ and when it ain’t. –Patrick F. McManus
  • Lunch Money SurfLunch Money Surf Posts: 1,029 Officer
    A "mint" Mitchell 498 can be worth a bit to collectors, especially if it came w/box & paper. Some rare versions more than others. May be the best all around Surf Spinning Reel ever made. And the heir to the Mitchell 'King of the Surf' classic SaltWater/302 spinning reels.

    No idea how used it is now, but did you consider picking up a cosmetically challenged 498 to fish?



    Not familiar w/"Seamaster drag cork" but am surprised you decided to "fabricated a new drag disk". Mitchell 498's original "Ferodo" racing car brake friction material, Teflon discs & drag design was hard to beat & NOS parts can still be found.

    Note these reel's Weak Links are; the plastic 'follower' that oscillates spool & its pins, and the plastic that the drag disc sits on.

    Cool post, I did not know that the drag disk was racing car brake material. It looks like an aggregate kind of like particle board. Unfortunately, the original drag disk had no 'middle' - if it was less than clamped all the way down it was loose. I have a theory that the reel sat so long in the box with pressure on the disk that it compressed and hardened. There was no play left in it. Seamaster was a legendary line of saltwater fly reels, and cork I obtained was allegedly used for their drags. I have zero corroborative evidence to support this, just the word of a guy a trust. The only thing I really know about the Seamaster is: if I were a fly fisherman and a millionaire I would want one.

    Now about the collectibility of the reel, it is a classic beginner's luck story. Years ago when I was getting really into pompano fishing I was having a large one piece fiberglass surf rod made. The guy who was making it told me that if I wanted to be a real pompano fisherman, I should go find a Mitchell 498 to put on the rod. So I went home and logged onto eBay. I immediately found a never-been-used 498, in the original box with the original reel oil and reel tool therein. I bid and won the reel for $120. And not knowing anything about them, didn't think twice about putting it to use. I probably would have anyway, I don't really care about collecting. Since that time I've checked eBay now and again, and even the 'cosmetically challenged' ones are $200 and up.
  • Lunch Money SurfLunch Money Surf Posts: 1,029 Officer
    I have these 2 Garcia Mitchell 300's that my dad gave me. I want to restore them and hang on the wall, but i'm not really sure where to start. They need paint and i'm sure new guts also.


    Pop them open! You might be surprised.
  • Lunch Money SurfLunch Money Surf Posts: 1,029 Officer
    I actually just took a picture of the reel for another thread:

    IMG_0168_zpsf996c271.jpg
  • Lunch Money SurfLunch Money Surf Posts: 1,029 Officer
    One more thought for the night...

    I have seen where Penn may very well be bringing back the greenie...

    There is a picture from a Penn rep on another surf fishing forum that looks suspiciously like a greenie... the rep is insinuating something but being cagey about it...

    Good God if they brought back these back in a 704 or 706 made like the originals I'd buy five or six
  • Anclote KeyAnclote Key Posts: 2,354 Officer
    Pop them open! You might be surprised.

    I think I could figure out how to replace the guts. There are several how to videos out there, but i'm not sure what to do about the paint. I wonder if they need to be stripped and repainted, or if it's possible to just clean and paint over the exisitinv paint. Then there is the question of what paint to use.
    The two best times to fish is when it’s rainin’ and when it ain’t. –Patrick F. McManus
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 Officer
    Classic Mitchell reel paint is problematic to "restore" b/c of the engraving. However, if they're only to be used to "hang on the wall" you might not need to worry "what paint to use" or preserving the engraving & just go with semigloss black spray can. Wall hangers also don't need "new guts".

    Old, salty, neglected, reels can be hard to dismantle in order to clean, repaint & repair internals. If you bust off or mung up a screw your "restore" can be in trouble.
    i'm not sure what to do about the paint. I wonder if they need to be stripped and repainted, or if it's possible to just clean and paint over the exisitinv paint. Then there is the question of what paint to use.

    If they were rare/valuable/collectible reels it would be wise to preserve as much original finish as possible. To "restore" you'd only want to remove only the blistered paint & repaint just the carefully cleaned corroded spots.

    Yours are the most common Mitchell 300's - their value being sentimental.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 Officer
    The 'middle' of the OEM drag disk had an ~1/2" hole w/4 slots to lock it on the plastic arbor. The Ferodo brake material was hard as a rock & essentially not compressible. It's designed to provide friction against alloy 'rotor' cut into bottom of spool. All the "play" is in the drag spring/thrust bearing assembly inside the drag adjustment knob.
    Cool post, I did not know that the drag disk was racing car brake material. It looks like an aggregate kind of like particle board. Unfortunately, the original drag disk had no 'middle' - if it was less than clamped all the way down it was loose. I have a theory that the reel sat so long in the box with pressure on the disk that it compressed and hardened. There was no play left in it.

    Sweet, even if your Mitchell 498 is the common color. Should've turned the pick up toward camera. Still kind of a shame to have fished "a never-been-used 498, in the original box" - how many "Years ago"? Presume you've seen the gaudy color Browning era 498's?

    A 498 is also overkill for Pompano.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 Officer
    Would not place too much stock on Penn bringing back Greenies "made like the originals".
    Good God if they brought back these back in a 704 or 706 made like the originals I'd buy five or six

    Happen to have 2 NOS Penn 704 black & gold reels. One could be yours.
  • Alex from GAAlex from GA Posts: 1,260 Officer
    I have a herd of old Mitchells, several 300s one with the 1/2 bail, 2-406s, 2-308s, 20+ spools, some 302 parts and spools, plus several older Penns, some have Newell parts, bars and reel seats. I also have a Reel Deal on a Penn 250. All for sale or trade.
  • Lunch Money SurfLunch Money Surf Posts: 1,029 Officer
    The 'middle' of the OEM drag disk had an ~1/2" hole w/4 slots to lock it on the plastic arbor. The Ferodo brake material was hard as a rock & essentially not compressible. It's designed to provide friction against alloy 'rotor' cut into bottom of spool. All the "play" is in the drag spring/thrust bearing assembly inside the drag adjustment knob.

    Sweet, even if your Mitchell 498 is the common color. Should've turned the pick up toward camera. Still kind of a shame to have fished "a never-been-used 498, in the original box" - how many "Years ago"? Presume you've seen the gaudy color Browning era 498's?

    A 498 is also overkill for Pompano.

    This reel will be 50 years old in a few months. Hand written label under the spool: "Test 30lb, Yds 205, Done 8/19/63"

    IMG_0195_zps1fb0b7a2.jpg

    Here is the original drag washer and the piece of cork I cut the new one out of:

    IMG_0193_zps8006dcb9.jpg

    As far as it being overkill for pompano, well maybe. Surf fishing is a lot of fighting conditions as much as fighting the fish. A 15' rod and 20# braid is probably overkill too, until you factor in reef and shore pound. The great thing about this reel in pompano is the spool diameter. On that 15' fiberglass rod, I can fling 6 oz of lead waaaay out there with minimal effort. I don't really use this reel for much else because I am too uncoordinated to really effectively use the bail-less retrieve.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 Officer
    Around here anglers used Mitchell 498 for 20-50+ lb fish like Bull reds, Tarpon, Cobia, King mackerel, Jacks, Snook, Dolphin, Barracuda & sharks. Up north it's Stripers & Bluefish. Suspect some of these Slammers would destroy "the piece of cork". Grouper digging off Cedar Key, I like to Switch Hit by sticking 60/80 lb Daiwa Sealine 400H/600H stout rod in holder & toss jig on 20 lb spinning reel to surprise fishing buddies. Used to use Mitchell 302/402, but switched to Penn 704Z.

    Never was lucky enough to catch even a 5 lb Pompano, FL record is 8 lb & change. Most aren't even keepers, so don't see Drag Screamin' Pompano. Surf fish w/498's little brother, the Mitchell 488, never been spooled, but have run up the beach. The soft cork may provide extra compliance & allow for finer adjustment of light drag range settings. But pretty sure the OEM Ferodo drag disc provides higher drag capacity & much better Hot & Heavy, Big Game, performance. That's where Ferodo friction material proves itself, when drag gets spool to hot to touch.
    This reel will be 50 years old in a few months. Hand written label under the spool: "Test 30lb, Yds 205, Done 8/19/63"

    Curious about that "Hand written label". Might be quite "a few months" before in "will be 50 years old"?

    My recollection that, Mitchell 498 wasn't introduced until 1969, is seconded by Dennis Roberts 'Mitchell Collector's Value Guide' & this website:

    http://users.skynet.be/mitchell-collectors.org/articles_mitchell498_1.html

    Presuming these sources are accurate, your reel won't have to face turning "50" for 6 more years.

    FYI: The Garcia spool "Hand written label" provides space to write in "Test Yds. Date" NOT "Done".
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 Officer
    Wonder how many readers are familiar with the Mitchell 498's - Trade Mark - manual pick up?

    Many Hard Core Surf Spin Fisherman loved it, b/c the - Pick Up Manual - was nearly immune to sand & was less likely to foul on Power Casts & sling shot terminal hardware straight to Davy Jones. Many more continued to thrive on the Full Bail original Surf Spinning reel 302, or the 386-488 series.

    More than a few also thought the French design "PUM" looked fairly quirky. To accomplish the large, heat dissipating, skirted, spool, Mitchell had to make a big "PUM".
  • monoxidemonoxide Posts: 1,094 Officer
    Oldest reel I own is a penn senator 1/0 but I'm not sure the date on it
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  • Lunch Money SurfLunch Money Surf Posts: 1,029 Officer
    Around here anglers used Mitchell 498 for 20-50+ lb fish like Bull reds, Tarpon, Cobia, King mackerel, Jacks, Snook, Dolphin, Barracuda & sharks. Up north it's Stripers & Bluefish. Suspect some of these Slammers would destroy "the piece of cork". Grouper digging off Cedar Key, I like to Switch Hit by sticking 60/80 lb Daiwa Sealine 400H/600H stout rod in holder & toss jig on 20 lb spinning reel to surprise fishing buddies. Used to use Mitchell 302/402, but switched to Penn 704Z.

    Never was lucky enough to catch even a 5 lb Pompano, FL record is 8 lb & change. Most aren't even keepers, so don't see Drag Screamin' Pompano. Surf fish w/498's little brother, the Mitchell 488, never been spooled, but have run up the beach. The soft cork may provide extra compliance & allow for finer adjustment of light drag range settings. But pretty sure the OEM Ferodo drag disc provides higher drag capacity & much better Hot & Heavy, Big Game, performance. That's where Ferodo friction material proves itself, when drag gets spool to hot to touch.



    Curious about that "Hand written label". Might be quite "a few months" before in "will be 50 years old"?

    My recollection that, Mitchell 498 wasn't introduced until 1969, is seconded by Dennis Roberts 'Mitchell Collector's Value Guide' & this website:

    http://users.skynet.be/mitchell-collectors.org/articles_mitchell498_1.html

    Presuming these sources are accurate, your reel won't have to face turning "50" for 6 more years.

    FYI: The Garcia spool "Hand written label" provides space to write in "Test Yds. Date" NOT "Done".

    It does say "Date" I mis-transcribed yesterday. But the date is clearly written 8/19/63. So either your recollection is incorrect or I have fallen prey to a ring of dastardly Mitchell counterfeiters.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 Officer
    My "recollection" has not "fallen prey to a...Hand written label" NOR have "I mis-transcribed" what Dennis Roberts published in his 2nd book on Mitchell Reels, which gives same '69 introduction of 498 as his 1st Mitchell book.
    It does say "Date" I mis-transcribed yesterday. But the date is clearly written 8/19/63. So either your recollection is incorrect or I have fallen prey to a ring of dastardly Mitchell counterfeiters.

    From the 'Mitchell Collector's International' link;

    "The year was 1969 when Mitchell officially introduced their model 498 surf reel. Mitchell, wanting to be innovative, yet competitive, designed the reel & it's components specifically for the surf. The 498 was fitted with hardened bronze gearing, weight balance ratio, a strong and multiple bearing point system, an extended manual pickup arm; later changed to a retractable system, an extra long handle to increase torque and retrieval speed, and an extra capacity spool to handle “heavy” line. The entire package was well suited for the event and received good results. From its début, it established itself as a premier surf reel that was capable in all situations, and achieved an enviable record of success in such places as Mexico's Baja Peninsula, Europe's volatile North Sea, and the turbulent surf at South Africa's Cape Horn. We would be remiss if we did not mention the great Mecca of surf fishing, Montauk Point in the US.

    Over the years, the 498 went through a series of refinements, a sort of renaissance period, both internally and externally. Collectors divide the 498 into 4 different periods of change. The first period starts at 1969 until 1978."

    Don't think you were duped by "dastardly Mitchell counterfeiters" either. Everything looks legit on the 498, except for one "Hand written" number.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 Officer
    Many Penn Senators aren't EZ to put a "date on".
    monoxide wrote: »
    Oldest reel I own is a penn senator 1/0 but I'm not sure the date on it

    They had some changes, but many parts were still interchangeable, so over the decades a lot of repairs can mix things up.

    Collectible early Senators just say Senator, no 'aught' designation. No P/N stamp on chromed brass parts. Earliest Senators from late 30's made using German silver instead of brass & have Rosewood knobs. They also had crank & FS lever in different positions.
  • Anclote KeyAnclote Key Posts: 2,354 Officer
    Classic Mitchell reel paint is problematic to "restore" b/c of the engraving. However, if they're only to be used to "hang on the wall" you might not need to worry "what paint to use" or preserving the engraving & just go with semigloss black spray can. Wall hangers also don't need "new guts".

    Old, salty, neglected, reels can be hard to dismantle in order to clean, repaint & repair internals. If you bust off or mung up a screw your "restore" can be in trouble.



    If they were rare/valuable/collectible reels it would be wise to preserve as much original finish as possible. To "restore" you'd only want to remove only the blistered paint & repaint just the carefully cleaned corroded spots.

    Yours are the most common Mitchell 300's - their value being sentimental.


    Interesting. I'm going to have to think about this. The rotating heads are definitely needing paint, but the rest of the reel looks like it will clean up nicely. Thanks for the tips.
    The two best times to fish is when it’s rainin’ and when it ain’t. –Patrick F. McManus
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