The Lost Dutchman claims another

tagtag Posts: 8,855 Admiral
I grew up with a great view of the Superstition Mountains from my back porch. It seemed every year another life would end while searching for the Lost Dutchman’s Mine. A mine that might have never existed. Anyway, I found this interesting while most you you may not.


Three years ago, a Denver bellhop ventured into Arizona’s Superstition Mountains determined to find the Lost Dutchman’s Mine, an elusive, vast gold reserve that has lured prospectors since the 19th century.

Jesse Capen, 35, had made finding the hidden treasure an “obsession” fueled by more than 100 books and maps on the legendary — and perhaps nonexistent — mine named for German immigrant Jacob "The Dutchman" Waltz. On Saturday, years after Capen’s Jeep, wallet, backpack and cellphone were found by hikers, volunteers from the Superstition Search and Rescue finally located what they believe is Capen’s body.
“We call ‘em Dutch hunters out here,” said Superstition Search and Rescue Director Robert Cooper. “They’re infatuated with all the lore and the history of the lost Dutchman mine and he was part of that.”

“They’re infatuated with all the lore and the history of the lost Dutchman mine and he was part of that.”
- Robert Cooper, Superstition Search and Rescue
While the remains have yet to be positively identified, Cooper said he’s “confident” the remains are that of Capen based on where the body was found, clothing found nearby and other identifying characteristics. The body, Cooper said, was found in a crevice roughly 35 feet up a cliff face in the southern portion of the Superstition Mountains, near the 4,892-foot Tortilla Mountain.

“We had been out there searching nearly every weekend for three years and this particular time we were scouring an area where a small daypack was located and had a few articles in it and we started scouring the cliffs,” Cooper told FoxNews.com. “And then we were able to spot a boot in a crevasse 35 feet off the floor, making it nearly impossible to see from any direction. He was in a tight spot and that’s why it took so long to find this young man.”
Capen’s father declined to comment, and his mother, Cynthia Burnett, could not be reached. But in 2010, Burnett told the Denver Post her son had become “obsessed” with the legend of the Arizona gold mine.

"This is beyond obsessed," Burnett told the newspaper. "He has more than 100 books and maps on the legend."
Cari Gerchick, communications director for Arizona’s Maricopa County, told FoxNews.com that the body is currently classified as unidentified. An autopsy took place on Tuesday, she said, and the results are expected to take weeks.
“We do not have a specific identification at this time,” Gerchick said.
In December 2009, a month after Capen’s disappearance, his campsite was found and clearly indicated his level of devotion to his newfound infatuation, Cooper said. A copy of Estee Conaster’s “The Sterling Legend: The Facts Behind the Lost Dutchman Mine” — billed as the definitive work on the lost mine — was found in his tent.

“So we kind of know what he was thinking and doing there,” Cooper said. “He would stay at his hotel, rest, shower and then head back out … a couple of days in, a couple of days out. All these guys think they found it or know the answer.”
Capen, who had worked at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel for more than a decade, had ventured to the area at least two other times in the past decade in search of the mine.

“He worked [the] graveyard [shift] and he mostly keep to himself,” hotel employee Terry Reyes told FoxNews.com. “[The lost mine] is the reason why he went there. He took a month off to go search for the treasure.”
Cooper said Capen's undoing was likely the result of heading out in search of lost gold alone.
“People should always tell someone where they’re going, have a plan and have someone go with them,” he said. “Most of our searches are for people who went in alone.”

Asked if he believed the rugged mountains contain one of the most enduring tales of treasure in North American history, Cooper replied: “I don’t believe it. Our wilderness doesn’t appear to have any gold in it, but a lot of people believe there is.”
Starwood Hotels and Resorts Area Managing Director Tom Curley said in a statement that the company is "relieved for the friends and family of Jesse Capen that his body presumably has been found."

"He is greatly missed by his fellow associates at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel," he said.
An untold number of prospectors have searched the Superstition Mountains for the mine. In the 1840s, according to the Denver Post, the Peralta family of Mexico mined gold out of the mountains, but Apaches attacked and killed all but one or two family members as they took the gold back to Mexico. Some 30 years later, Jacob Waltz — nicknamed "the Dutchman," even though he was German — rediscovered the mine with the help of a Peralta descendant, according to legend.
Waltz, who died without revealing the mine’s location, reportedly shot people who followed him as he returned to it for more gold


Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/11/29/body-found-in-arizona-superstition-mountains-believed-to-that-missing-treasure/?test=latestnews#ixzz2Di6ui5Of

Replies

  • MenziesMenzies Posts: 19,289 AG
    It's mine, all mine.
    Maybe if we tell people that the brain is an App, they will start using it.
  • hooknlinehooknline Posts: 5,324 Admiral
    When and where did you grow up in the valley?
    If I say something that offends you, please let me know so I can say it again later

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  • pointerDixie214pointerDixie214 Posts: 5,658 Admiral
    Seemed like there were lots of people that died in the Supes when we lived there. Although most hiker rescues happened on Camelback mountain... which is laughable compared to the Superstitions.

    I hiked there a lot and never found the Dutchman's treasure.
    "Her beauty radiated like a beacon from a lighthouse!" - Buddy McCoy :hail
  • Cane PoleCane Pole Stuart, FLAPosts: 9,804 Admiral
    Superstition-Mountain-AZ.jpg
    Looks like a great place to photograph!
    Live music 7 nights a week: http://www.terrafermata.com/_events
  • Superstition-Mountain-AZ.jpg


    Very majestic.
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  • nuclearfishnnuclearfishn Posts: 8,356 Admiral
    I spent almost 2 years in NM and AZ. I'm not going back to the desert unless it's in handcuffs, don't care how purdy it looks.
  • hooknlinehooknline Posts: 5,324 Admiral
    Somebody Toogle "weavers needle" images. That place is amazing.
    I loved hiking the superstitions. Amazing the ecology and different plants at different altitudes.
    Camel back mountain has more people die on it because its a simple hike, but people forget that even in the desert nothing is simple if you take it for granted.
    My then girlfriend and future wife lived at the base of south mountain and we spent a lot of "quality" time up in the rocks.
    If I say something that offends you, please let me know so I can say it again later

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  • MosesMoses Posts: 1,203 Officer
    Cane Pole wrote: »
    Superstition-Mountain-AZ.jpg
    Looks like a great place to photograph!

    Hope you got the license to post that.....:nono
    The peanuts and beer took its toll. I had to fart really bad. I would normally ease away and let it out. I thought it was time for her to grow up.
    It was a varoooom! It shook the pine needles off the trees. She broke and ran.
    "Daddy, you stink!"
    She's my best buddy to this day! You never know how these things will work out!
    Sayin... Reck

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  • PopeyePopeye Posts: 14,296 AG
    License? He dont need no stinking license.......
    When I was younger, I could remember anything...

    whether it had happened or not.

    Mark Twain
  • pointerDixie214pointerDixie214 Posts: 5,658 Admiral
    hooknline wrote: »
    Somebody Toogle "weavers needle" images. That place is amazing.
    I loved hiking the superstitions. Amazing the ecology and different plants at different altitudes.
    Camel back mountain has more people die on it because its a simple hike, but people forget that even in the desert nothing is simple if you take it for granted.
    My then girlfriend and future wife lived at the base of south mountain and we spent a lot of "quality" time up in the rocks.

    Yeah, Weaver's Needle is pretty awesome. Siphon Draw is my favorite trail I hiked up there. And Y Bar Basin in the Mazatzal Wilderness. Camelbak has a lot of people die on it because the stupid rich tourists think that since it's in the city they can hike it without water. Fumb duckers.

    Brown's Peak (Four Peaks) is another fun one. Crazy that it can be 70 degrees on the valley floor in the winter, and there is literally feet of snow on Brown's peak, just a few miles away and about 7,000 feet higher.

    SoMo was one of my favorite places to mountain bike in the valley.
    "Her beauty radiated like a beacon from a lighthouse!" - Buddy McCoy :hail
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