Skip to main content
Home Politics

Clint Eastwood, Lawyers, and the ADA . . .

Baits OutBaits Out Posts: 12,328 AG
It wasn’t everyone’s idea of what a political speech should be, but this morning it was the speech everyone wanted to talk about: Addressing an empty chair representing President Obama, movie great Clint Eastwood took a swipe at the legal profession (“I never thought it was a good idea for attorneys to be president, anyway”) and made a case against the Democrats without actually showing all that much enthusiasm for the Republican Party. And those of us who’ve followed Eastwood’s comments on government and liberty over the years weren’t quite as surprised as many in the press seemed to be.

Did you know, for example, that Eastwood testified before Congress in 2000 on an issue that symbolizes the dysfunctional collision of law, legislation, and politics—that is to say, opportunistic ADA lawsuits? As I wrote at Overlawyered at the time:

The Hollywood actor and filmmaker got interested in the phenomenon of lawsuit mills that exploit the Americans with Disabilities Act … when he was hit with a complaint that some doors and bathrooms at his historic, 32-room Mission Ranch Hotel and restaurant in Carmel, Calif. weren’t accessible enough; there followed demands from the opposing side’s lawyer that he hand over more than just a fistful of dollars—$577,000, the total came to—in fees for legal work allegedly performed on the case. “It’s a racket”, opines Eastwood. “The typical thing is to get someone who is disabled in collusion with sleazebag lawyers, and they file suits.” … Eastwood told the WSJ he isn’t quarreling with the ADA itself, and the proposed legislation would affect only future cases and not the one against him; but “I just think for the benefit of everybody, they should cut out this racket because these are morally corrupt people who are doing this.”

Congress heard Eastwood’s and similar testimony and then did … nothing at all, not wanting to offend the more uncompromising lawyers in the disabled-rights movement. (More here, etc.)

There’s nothing like exposure to ADA filing mills to give one a jaundiced view of the legal profession. Although Democrats quickly pointed out that Romney and several other leading Republicans have law degrees, that doesn’t really blunt Eastwood’s point: by heading for legal academia, Obama signaled that the training “took” in a way that the business types like Romney didn’t.

There’s also nothing like exposure to ADA filing mills to give one a feeling that while the Democratic Party is more problematic overall, the Republicans aren’t necessarily a bargain either. While conservative GOPers are typically the ones who lead the charge to curtail ADA shakedown suits, much of the party is unwilling to cross the disabled-rights community on the issue — and this too is a long-running theme, with Presidents Bush both pere et fils having made a huge to-do about their unconditional support for a broadly applied ADA.

For many good reasons, not least diplomacy toward many Republicans in the audience, it could be predicted that Eastwood would say not a word about the ADA issue last night. But when he talked of the economic damage caused by feckless governance, I wonder whether he drew on his own experience as a small businessperson—and his awareness that when bad law closes down a restaurant, as has happened repeatedly in his own northern California, one can wind up with not just a single vacant chair but a whole roomful of them.


http://www.cato-at-liberty.org/clint-eastwood-lawyers-and-the-ada/

A southeast Florida laid back beach bum and volunteer bikini assessor who lives on island time. 

Replies

  • MenziesMenzies Posts: 19,289 AG
    After last night I can certainly understand his interest in the ADA.
    Maybe if we tell people that the brain is an App, they will start using it.
  • doobiedorightdoobiedoright Posts: 644 Officer
    Baits Out wrote: »
    It wasn’t everyone’s idea of what a political speech should be, but this morning it was the speech everyone wanted to talk about: Addressing an empty chair representing President Obama, movie great Clint Eastwood took a swipe at the legal profession (“I never thought it was a good idea for attorneys to be president, anyway”) and made a case against the Democrats without actually showing all that much enthusiasm for the Republican Party. And those of us who’ve followed Eastwood’s comments on government and liberty over the years weren’t quite as surprised as many in the press seemed to be.

    Did you know, for example, that Eastwood testified before Congress in 2000 on an issue that symbolizes the dysfunctional collision of law, legislation, and politics—that is to say, opportunistic ADA lawsuits? As I wrote at Overlawyered at the time:

    The Hollywood actor and filmmaker got interested in the phenomenon of lawsuit mills that exploit the Americans with Disabilities Act … when he was hit with a complaint that some doors and bathrooms at his historic, 32-room Mission Ranch Hotel and restaurant in Carmel, Calif. weren’t accessible enough; there followed demands from the opposing side’s lawyer that he hand over more than just a fistful of dollars—$577,000, the total came to—in fees for legal work allegedly performed on the case. “It’s a racket”, opines Eastwood. “The typical thing is to get someone who is disabled in collusion with sleazebag lawyers, and they file suits.” … Eastwood told the WSJ he isn’t quarreling with the ADA itself, and the proposed legislation would affect only future cases and not the one against him; but “I just think for the benefit of everybody, they should cut out this racket because these are morally corrupt people who are doing this.”

    Congress heard Eastwood’s and similar testimony and then did … nothing at all, not wanting to offend the more uncompromising lawyers in the disabled-rights movement. (More here, etc.)

    There’s nothing like exposure to ADA filing mills to give one a jaundiced view of the legal profession. Although Democrats quickly pointed out that Romney and several other leading Republicans have law degrees, that doesn’t really blunt Eastwood’s point: by heading for legal academia, Obama signaled that the training “took” in a way that the business types like Romney didn’t.

    There’s also nothing like exposure to ADA filing mills to give one a feeling that while the Democratic Party is more problematic overall, the Republicans aren’t necessarily a bargain either. While conservative GOPers are typically the ones who lead the charge to curtail ADA shakedown suits, much of the party is unwilling to cross the disabled-rights community on the issue — and this too is a long-running theme, with Presidents Bush both pere et fils having made a huge to-do about their unconditional support for a broadly applied ADA.

    For many good reasons, not least diplomacy toward many Republicans in the audience, it could be predicted that Eastwood would say not a word about the ADA issue last night. But when he talked of the economic damage caused by feckless governance, I wonder whether he drew on his own experience as a small businessperson—and his awareness that when bad law closes down a restaurant, as has happened repeatedly in his own northern California, one can wind up with not just a single vacant chair but a whole roomful of them.


    http://www.cato-at-liberty.org/clint-eastwood-lawyers-and-the-ada/


    Full disclosure here ...I am disabled so now you know where I am coming from.....


    We had our second football game tonight and when I showed up to do my film work members of the booster club said to me you wont believe this...
    They got a call Wednesday from the other team that they had a band member who is disabled and you have to builg a spot for her.
    Ok so they went out hired a friend of the boosters and $1800.00 bucks later they have a platform and ramp for her.
    So we get to half time and this person has played nothing so far.
    This person is wheeled to her spot and given a bass guitar for their half time show!
    Then gets to go back to this platform built just for her so she could sit with the band and play but they dont use the bass during the game!
    After the game went and told the booster club send them the bill it was total bull ****!
    This is just wrong when the schools her are in what they call proation in other words cutting back as much as possible!
    There is no reason she A couldn't sit in the spot already available for disabled persons or B she could of been down by the fence in the end zone where I am total crap they pulled this!
Sign In or Register to comment.
Magazine Cover

GET THE MAGAZINE Subscribe & Save

Digital Now Included!

SUBSCRIBE NOW

Give a Gift   |   Subscriber Services

Preview This Month's Issue

Buy Digital Single Issues

Don't miss an issue.
Buy single digital issue for your phone or tablet.

Buy Single Digital Issue on the Florida Sportsman App

Other Magazines

See All Other Magazines

Special Interest Magazines

See All Special Interest Magazines

GET THE NEWSLETTER Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Florida Sportsman stories delivered right to your inbox.

Advertisement

Phone Icon

Get Digital Access.

All Florida Sportsman subscribers now have digital access to their magazine content. This means you have the option to read your magazine on most popular phones and tablets.

To get started, click the link below to visit mymagnow.com and learn how to access your digital magazine.

Get Digital Access

Not a Subscriber?
Subscribe Now