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How to restore a knife?

BnTBnT Posts: 6,644 Admiral
My mom just found one of my great grandfathers old knives around my grandpas house the other day. I want to make it look good again, what should i do? I'm not too worried about making the wood look nice, just the blade. I plan on stabbing some sort of animal with this one day.
here some pics

knife.jpg
knife1.jpg
"Give a man a fish and feed him for a day... Don’t teach a man to fish…and feed yourself. He’s a grown man. And fishing’s not that hard"
gandrfab wrote: »
Sharky is always clocky, bnt is sometimes sharky,
sharky is sometimes bnt, but bnt is never clocky

Replies

  • micci_manmicci_man Somewhere in FLPosts: 14,658 AG
    Just put a edge on it and roll with it. That blade is carbon steel (the good stuff) or the like and will rust regardless.
    Common Sense can't be bought, taught or gifted, yet it is one of the few things in life that is free, and most refuse to even attempt to possess it. - Miguel Cervantes
  • gandrfabgandrfab Posts: 21,685 AG
    duel action sander start with a grit that will clean it up then keep stepping down on the grit until you have a finish you like. or you could continue and polish it.
  • breambream Posts: 74 Greenhorn
    Rub with Hoppes No. 9 and 0000 steel wool or brass wool (even better) to remove rust. Oil the wood.
  • ChuddybuckrivetChuddybuckrivet Posts: 3,156 Officer
    micci_man wrote: »
    Just put a edge on it and roll with it.

    Agreed. Especially if you plan on sticking critters with it.
    If you want it to look nice for display, then go with what ganderfab said.
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    bream wrote: »
    Rub with Hoppes No. 9 and 0000 steel wool or brass wool (even better) to remove rust. Oil the wood.

    Yep, use mineral oil on the wood, or boiled linseed oil.

    Neat knife, I have two very similar. One a curved blade the other a long thinner blade.

    Are there any markings or #'s?
  • camojoecamojoe Posts: 1,117 Officer
    I would block sand that blade starting with ~200 grit wet/dry paper using WD40 as a lubricant. Sand in one direction with 200 to start and alternate as you change to finer grits. This method will reveal any scratches in areas that need more work. If a satin finish is desired, finishing with 600-800 grit should suffice. To help combat rust issues you could force a patina with vinegar or mustard.

    Linseed, Tung, or Tru-Oil for the wood. Congrats on the find and good luck.

    Tutorial http://www.engnath.com/handrub.htm
    Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

    Groucho Marx
  • Fish HaidFish Haid Posts: 8,417 Admiral
    Fill your clothes dryer with gravel and add one quart of used motor oil. Put knife inside, and run on HIGH for 4 hours.
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  • gandrfabgandrfab Posts: 21,685 AG
    camojoe wrote: »
    I would block sand that blade starting with ~200 grit wet/dry paper using WD40 as a lubricant. Sand in one direction with 200 to start and alternate as you change to finer grits. This method will reveal any scratches in areas that need more work. If a satin finish is desired, finishing with 600-800 grit should suffice. To help combat rust issues you could force a patina with vinegar or mustard.

    Linseed, Tung, or Tru-Oil for the wood. Congrats on the find and good luck.

    This can make a very nice finish, but I have power tools.
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    I would leave it like your great grandpa would have. A little character never hurt anything. You can always buy a shiny knife but you can't always have one like this.
  • King_MeKing_Me Delray Beach, FLPosts: 6,547 Admiral
    srqmynatt wrote: »

    This is what I use.
  • FibberMckeeFibberMckee Posts: 12,837 AG
    Interesting old knife & some good ideas. However IMO, after restoring hundreds of knives, stay away from sandpaper on the blade. First thing I'd do would be to find maker's mark/name, a knife of this vintage should have one. Traditionally on left side, most likely place to look is near rear of blade by handle. The bevel at top front was often used by Case & they often put their mark on left near top, near middle of blade (or closer) to handle.

    You may need to remove some rust to find and/or read traditional blade stamping. I use a decent old knife that's not of any special value other than a tool to burnish metal. The idea is to scrape the worst rust scale off w/o abrading the collectible knife. Since it's an interesting old knife w/sentimental value I'd burnish the entire blade this way. The goal being to remove as much rust as possible w/o removing steel from the blade. Can take hours & give you cramp in hand. Unless there are no rust pits it's pointless to try for a brite polished steel blade. They look better w/patina.

    Before putting an edge on it refresh the wood handle & rivets. Makes knife safer to deal with by leaving it dull. If handle halves are loose (before sanding or applying any oil) clamp them snuggly, stiff brush rivets to remove corrosion & Superglue around rivets to 'harden' dotty decayed wood & tighten fit. Now sand wood to uncover color, reduce defects & polish rivets, but don't over do it.

    At this point you'll know exactly what you've got. To finish blade use heavy steel wool to soften burnishing & apply gun bluing to mute brite areas & unify an antique patina. To finish wood handle, polish w/steel wool, brush to remove debris from grain & rub w/linseed oil.

    Now's the time to restore the edge & sharpen. Oil wetstone & stroke it top to bottom NOT end to end to remove nicks & restore profile. Hone edge end to end to choice of sharpness.
  • BnTBnT Posts: 6,644 Admiral
    thanks for the responses guys! there are two more... one of them says "HAMMER FORGED, MADE IN U S A"
    i still dont know what i'm gonna do with them, like some of you said i wanna leave it with a little character but it just looks so junky right now.. I tried steel wool but it didn't do much.
    "Give a man a fish and feed him for a day... Don’t teach a man to fish…and feed yourself. He’s a grown man. And fishing’s not that hard"
    gandrfab wrote: »
    Sharky is always clocky, bnt is sometimes sharky,
    sharky is sometimes bnt, but bnt is never clocky
  • BnTBnT Posts: 6,644 Admiral
    Cyclist wrote: »
    Yep, use mineral oil on the wood, or boiled linseed oil.

    Neat knife, I have two very similar. One a curved blade the other a long thinner blade.

    Are there any markings or #'s?
    the long thinner blade is the one with the hammer forged marking on it.
    "Give a man a fish and feed him for a day... Don’t teach a man to fish…and feed yourself. He’s a grown man. And fishing’s not that hard"
    gandrfab wrote: »
    Sharky is always clocky, bnt is sometimes sharky,
    sharky is sometimes bnt, but bnt is never clocky
  • RareRare Posts: 248 Deckhand
    King_Me wrote: »
    This is what I use.

    I was looking at that, but think I'm getting this..


    [video=youtube_share;N6GVHHNjMgE]
  • CyclistCyclist Posts: 23,346 AG
    BnT wrote: »
    the long thinner blade is the one with the hammer forged marking on it.


    I'll take a pic of mine. I think we have the same knife(s). Mine says the same thing.

    They take an edge fast but don't hold it through skinning a large hog. My go to knives.
  • Reelgirl2012Reelgirl2012 Posts: 141 Officer
    How about trying the last couple of minutes of this video?!
    http://http://www.wimp.com/cuttinginstrument/
  • BnTBnT Posts: 6,644 Admiral
    How about trying the last couple of minutes of this video?!
    http://http://www.wimp.com/cuttinginstrument/

    Thats how we made em in prison.
    "Give a man a fish and feed him for a day... Don’t teach a man to fish…and feed yourself. He’s a grown man. And fishing’s not that hard"
    gandrfab wrote: »
    Sharky is always clocky, bnt is sometimes sharky,
    sharky is sometimes bnt, but bnt is never clocky
  • hewes18hewes18 Posts: 757 Officer
    Age has character - sharpen it and leave pappy's knife alone.
    tumblr_lkaudd2RQQ1qg6fb5.gif
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