Trailer Tires, How hot is too hot?

BiohazzardBiohazzard Posts: 221 Officer
Well I blew out another trailer tire on my annual trip to the keys this past week. The blow out occured on the front passenger side of my trailer and the tires were just over a year old. Purchased a new set for the front axel and double checked for the correct pressure (50 LBS). Being paranoid I shot all four tires and hubs with my temp gun each stop on the way home and on long runs was surprised to seem the tires hitting high 130's(136-138). This seems way too hot. Is this OK or is this what is causing my blowouts? My Pathfinder 22v is well within the weight limits of the four tires.

What gives.

Replies

  • ActionC39ActionC39 Posts: 7 Greenhorn
    Are you noticing any irregular tread wear on any of the other tires? Tire Brand? Bias Ply or Radial?
  • big_tbig_t Posts: 588 Officer
    just out of curiosity, did you see what the tow vehicles tire temps were?
    All four tires on the trailer were about the same temp?
    Just for ha ha's, why not find a scale (truck stop) and see what the wt of the boat/trailer is?
  • CaptTaterCaptTater Posts: 20,096 AG
    I used to measure mine religiously with an IR gun and they were sneaking up on 120deg on hot days on the road. That was on both a double axle with light 30' scarab and triple axle with heavy Regulator 32.
    Overheating will cause blow outs. As said, stop by a truck stop or even the local dump and weight it. Boats get fat as you put more crap on them.
    I did not read the story but if you take tax payers money maybe you should be held to some standards.-Cyclist
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  • camgcicamgci Posts: 185 Deckhand
    How fast were you running? Most trailer tires are only rated for 65mph according to what the tire shop told me when I was blowing tires on my 5th wheel. I slowed down and it seem to help. All my blowouts were when outside temps were 95 degrees or hotter. I imagine the black tops roads were at least 140.
    I'm thinking of going to a LT truck tire next time around. My neighbor did about 6 years ago and hasn't had a problem since.
  • BiohazzardBiohazzard Posts: 221 Officer
    Based upon the responces Im thinkin 138 it a bit too hot. Interestingly enough none of the 4 tires(Bias ply) had any tire wear as the rear two were less than 1 year old the front two were only a year and a half. Aside from the annual trip to the keys the only milage they see is 3-4 miles back and fourth to the ramp 3-4 times per month. I might have gotten over 65 once and a while but by no means for any length of time. This one blew in downtown homestead after 30-40 minutes doing 40-45 mph on 997/ Krome Ave. I am positive my rig is way under the waight limit(Pathfinder 22v w/ Yamaha 225 w/ less than a 1/4 tank of gas & aluminum tandem axel) all the gear was in the truck?? I will weigh it though. The front axel was changed prior to my purchase and it looks a little wider, maybe this is it?
  • acarbacarb Posts: 2,357 Captain
    What is the air pressure after the tire has gotten hot? U may get a surprise when u check them with 120 degrees in them.
  • BeckBeck Posts: 2,332 Captain
    I trailer back and forth to the Panhandle several times a year. Last week when the outside temps were 100 plus, my tires were in the 130's and hubs around 115-125. These are normal ranges on my trailer.

    Tires were reading about the same on my tow vehicle. I have much better luck with radial tires than bias ply.

    I have been reading good things about these lately......think I will try them next time. Speed rated to 99 MPH.

    http://www.kumhotireusa.com/tire/category/truck-suv/7EAB87AD-62DC-4D82-897E-E59335DE416C

    I do try to stay around the 65 MPH mark, and run max PSI. Also, I balance my tires and change them out every 3 or 4 years.
  • PIERCINLIPSPIERCINLIPS Posts: 191 Officer
    Do you typically only blow the front tires? if that is the case you need to check the trailer set up and see how much weight is on the front axle vs the rear axle. it may be as simple as moving the winch stand back a few inches to distribute the load more evenly, or you may need to raise you hitch.
  • SCFD rtrd.SCFD rtrd. Posts: 1,369 Officer
    Beck wrote: »
    I trailer back and forth to the Panhandle several times a year. Last week when the outside temps were 100 plus, my tires were in the 130's and hubs around 115-125. These are normal ranges on my trailer.

    Tires were reading about the same on my tow vehicle. I have much better luck with radial tires than bias ply.

    I have been reading good things about these lately......think I will try them next time. Speed rated to 99 MPH.

    http://www.kumhotireusa.com/tire/category/truck-suv/7EAB87AD-62DC-4D82-897E-E59335DE416C

    I do try to stay around the 65 MPH mark, and run max PSI. Also, I balance my tires and change them out every 3 or 4 years.

    Exactly!!!@# I run from Orlando to Englewood and back on I-75 & I-4. Make two stops while enroute. All tires are about 135 degrees (truck and duel axle trailer) hubs about 125 degrees.

    Here's the deal. I've had one flat tire on my boat trailer in 12 years. That's running between Orlando and Englewood at 65 mph. However, when we use to make our annual trip to the Keys, I guarantee you, we would have one flat on the trailer either coming or going. I don't understand it. If I can pull at trailer 150 miles for years without a flat, then why can't I pull a trailer 350 miles without a flat??????
  • tunamantunaman Posts: 3,714 Captain
    Bio, I was like you, blowing tires a LOT, especially on a trip of any distance. I have a float-on trailer, made for up to I'd say 24' boat. I'm hauling a 207 (20'7") SEAHUNT, so definitely not overloaded. Tires 14", load range C. Were always at max pressure(45-50). Tires were TR tires bought at local trailer dealer. , of coarse double axel. Owned it 5 yrs, had several several differant brands of tires thru the yrs. Never really used it a lot, maybe a trip to the keys a yr, 350 miles each way and 2-3 trips to Ft. Pierce, 150 each way.. Couple weeks before going to keys this yr noticed one tire, almost new tread, had broken steel cords, tread was round like a banana! I said "thats enough of this crap". I broke for 4 new Loadmaster, 15", TR, 275/75R 15, Load Range E! new wheels and all, rated 80Lbs of air. I maintained 70, no bulge in sidewall at all. Went to Keys, 65-70 all the way. Hotter than hades. I don't carry a heat gun, I feel them like all truck drivers! Tires stayed warm to the touch, no way hot. End of problem!! I know, someone will say they're too hard, not enough give, thats right, they are a little hard, thats what the springs are for, I noticed no difference in bounce, but I bet every 1" bump i went over the tires didn't bulge!
  • tunamantunaman Posts: 3,714 Captain
    Oh, I forgot to mention, I have a tire balancer, 3 need no weight, the fourth maybe an ounce.
  • BiohazzardBiohazzard Posts: 221 Officer
    When I get home I will check the load rate on the 2 new ones I picked up while in Marathon.
    I am crossing my fingers for a rating of E . Did not really know of the letter designation only the load weight and rebber density.
  • mustang190mustang190 Posts: 9,772 Admiral
    Low air pressure and high speed are the main things that blow out a tire. Always run the air pressure that is on the tire. Most all passenger (unless your buying GY Eagles or high dollar Pirelli's) and trailer tires are rated for 65 mph. And use a higher load rating for your trailer.
    2013 Pathfinder 22 TE , 150 Yamaha,
  • BiohazzardBiohazzard Posts: 221 Officer
    Dang I got C's
  • chascleverchasclever Bullhead City, APosts: 1 Greenhorn
    RE TIRE TEMPERATURES: This is what the manufacturer of trucking tire temperatures says:

    "Most experts consider 195 degrees Fahrenheit as the “line in the sand” when it comes to tire temperature: Beyond that point, the temperature will start impacting tire life. At 250 degrees, a tire will start to lose structural strength, could begin experiencing tread reversion and the tire will begin to lose strength."

    If they get dangerously hot, check all tire pressures, park and let the tires cool, and redistribute load.

    Have a safe trip.
  • Saltwater JunkieSaltwater Junkie Posts: 1,010 Officer
    PIERCINLIPS - is pretty close to what I'm going to say. However, moving the winch stand back as he suggested may then lead to less support at the back of the boat. So you would have to move the bunks back as well. So that the bunks go all the way back, just past the transom.

    What I suggest is to take the truck and trailer and park it on level ground. Then take a level and place it oh the I-beam near the hitch. Is it level? if it is then both axles are carrying the same load. If not the you need to raise or lower the hitch until it is level.

    It is very important on tandem and triple axle trailers that all axles are carrying the same load. Otherwise, the front or rear tires are carrying the majority of the weight as are those hub bearings. You should also check what the "Load Range" is on those tires.   
  • jpscott1jpscott1 Posts: 13 Greenhorn
    OK- I am no expert on this- and my situation may not be relevant- since my boat is smaller.
    I just towed my Pathfinder 15T  1,500 miles last week with out issue. 
    I have a Shorelander trailer with 4.80 x 12 tires/rims.
    I was very concerned about blowing out a tire on such a long trip with such small tires.
    I bought 2 new tires and a spare from eTrailer mounted on galvanized rims that are Bias Ply Load range C and Speed Rated at 81 mph (this is stamped on the side of the tire).  They were inflated to max pressure of 90psi.
    I replaced the hubs and bearings as well.
    My boat is pretty light- the whole rig with boat/motor/trailer/batteries/gear etc is about 1,300 lbs.
    I towed at 73MPH and my tires never got more than warm to the touch.
    Luckily- I made the trip without issue.
  • Saltwater JunkieSaltwater Junkie Posts: 1,010 Officer
    I balance my trailer tires. It make for a smoother ride and also likely helps to make the trailer tires last longer.
  • polliwogpolliwog Posts: 226 Deckhand
    I gave my son a BW Montauk  to take out to BC,Canada from the east coast last summer in July.  I put new Tires and hubs on the trailer which is 25yrs old.  Total trip was 1450 miles in brutally hot  weather. 50lbs of tire pressure cold and the trip was eventless for the whole trip.  Maybe  luck or maybe just getting the rig set up right made the trip smooth. He did have 2 spares just in case.
  • jordinejordine flPosts: 18 Greenhorn
    polliwog said:
    I gave my son a BW Montauk  to take out to BC,Canada from the east coast last summer in July.  I put new Tires and hubs on the trailer which is 25yrs old.  Total trip was 1450 miles in brutally hot  weather. 50lbs of tire pressure cold and the trip was eventless for the whole trip.  Maybe  luck or maybe just getting the rig set up right made the trip smooth. He did have 2 spares just in case.
    What tires are you running? Last month, I bought a set of Goodyear Endurance from 4wheelonline. So far, tires work flawlessly. Hoping to get good miles out of them.
  • MelbourneMarkMelbourneMark Posts: 1,552 Captain
    Is the trailer frame level when its hooked up to the truck?  It needs to be...
     If the its squatting towards the front, then you can adjust the hitch so that its higher.  I helped a buddy out with this before.. He was going to add extra springs to his vehicle, and instead I had him buy a different hitch receiver which made the ball sit higher.. Once the trailer was hooked up, the truck squatted the same, but the trailer was level and the weight was distributed to both axles evenly. 
  • SaltySardineSaltySardine Posts: 159 Deckhand
    trailer tires, unless specified otherwise, are rated for 65 mph. You will blow tires all the time if you go 80mph. 

    Get LT tires or tires rated higher. Tire Kingdom makes some rated for 75 and some other brands are up to 80. I would go light truck tires. Be hard to blow those in any conditions
  • polliwogpolliwog Posts: 226 Deckhand
    Jordine, I'm sorry I don't remember what brand.  I used my trailer dealer who I have used for yrs to put the right tires on for a grueling trip.  They were not priced out of the normal range.  My son is still running the same tires.  I'll try to find out from the dealer.
  • Rich MRich M Posts: 1,041 Officer
    Are you running "bias" trailer tires or radials?  Radials will outlast the bias tires.
  • Garza BlancaGarza Blanca Posts: 80 Greenhorn
    I put a set of (5) Goodyear Endurance radials on last year and couldn't be happier. Also went from 13 to 14 inch wheels. Doesn't even feel like the boat is back there.
  • SportsFanSportsFan Posts: 134 Deckhand
    Bio, here is a thought for you to check. Check the axle squareness to the trailer. Before semi-retiring I sold tires professionally and yes many times I heard a customer say "another trailer tire blew out". I am not an expert and do not know the temp max's. I read you have C range tires. If they are trailer only tires and name brand that should be fine especially with four of them. Look at the load max on the tires and then add that up. Most tire issues we saw were on the right side of the trailers. Cars, boats, you name it.  That happens cause sooner or later one of those tires will grab a curb or run over debris. Not saying you did, just saying what I've seen. The belts in the tire can become damaged but never noticed until at highway speeds and extra heat build up. Back to the axle squareness, how many reading this have seen scalloping or tires wear on either two tires or a specific tire ? If the axle is not square to the trailer the tire will scuff as it goes down the road. Radials do not scallop as bad as bias tires do but if a tire or tires are scuffing that generates more heat. If nothing else it's worth a look.  C trailer tires I believe are 50 lbs max cold.  I generally set mine approx 2 lbs under max with an accurate quality gauge. Low pressure in tires generates more heat. I mentioned name brand tires. I am assuming that the fact you a Pathfinder you are not putting China $60.00 knock offs on it. 
    Carlisle, Goodyear Marathons, Kuhmo's, all make quality trailer tires.
      Jules.  
    image-logo.png
  • shamrock1188shamrock1188 Posts: 272 Deckhand
    (The blow out occurred on the front passenger side of my trailer) What SportsFan said makes sense that is the tire that hits the curb first. Bais tires work best for me I found the steel belt tires will get cuts in them and salt water will rust the steel belts and the tire will separate.
  • DfreedomDfreedom Posts: 106 Deckhand
    I've been running Carlisle Radial Trail HDs at up to 70 mph on trips from SC to the Keys as well as the west coast of FL.  I run them at 60 psi and have no problems since I started running these.  Never check tire temp but I do put my finger on the hub.  If it is too hot to hold it on there, it's too hot.
  • pjepje Orlando , FlPosts: 567 Officer
    Do yourself a favor and switch to LT tires , ST tires are a ticking time bomb no matter who makes them . Do it right once and you will go years before you have to replace them . Just check your air and go . I like having the peace of mind that there will be no surprises , unlike running maypops , where you are guaranteed to be inconvenienced at the worst possible time .
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