Vic Dunaway passed away

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Replies

  • Salty GatorSalty Gator Posts: 1,806 Captain
    :angel

    He was truly an icon. As a kid, I remember seeing a picture similar to the one a few posts back. He was wading with a jumping snook on the line. I had caught a few small snook, but that picture really inspired Snook Fever. Baits, Rigs and Tackle and From Hook to Table have been fantastic resources for me over the years. Had the pleasure of meeting him at a FS show 10 years ago. He will be missed.
  • GrizGriz Palm Beach Gardens, FloridaPosts: 9,736 Admin
    got the chance to hang with him a bit at the FS Show a couple of years ago and also sample some of his soup. He had some good recipes as well as stories. RIP Vic.
    The early bird may get the worm, but the Second Mouse gets the cheese. SW

    :Griz
  • cprcpr Posts: 9,292 Admiral
    RIP, his book baits, rigs and tackle is my main reference.
    "The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function." F. Scott Fitzgerald

    "Prediction is very difficult, especially if it's about the future." Niels Bohr
  • Cane PoleCane Pole Stuart, FLAPosts: 9,624 Admiral
    FAMED OUTDOOR WRITER PASSES
    Vic Dunaway of Florida Sportsman dead at 82.
    By Frank Sargeant
    [email protected]

    Vic Dunaway died Thursday in an Ocala hospice at 82.

    For decades, he was outdoors editor of the Miami Herald when it was Florida’s largest newspaper, director of the Miami MET, then the world’s largest fishing tournament, and then went on for decades more beginning in 1969 as a founding editor of Florida Sportsman Magazine, Florida’s largest fishing publication.

    Vic was a real fishing celebrity, far more than just another outdoors writer. He was a story teller, a true raconteur who had a funny, finny or ribald story to fit every occasion. People loved to be around him.

    “Vic was the ultimate combination of talents and skills and demonstrated a unique ability to both know how to get the most out of the outdoors and then convey that material to his readers with wit and clarity,” said FS Founder Karl Wickstrom at the magazine’s headquarters in Stuart.

    For years, Vic wrote and photographed features as well as columns—he was the heart and soul of the magazine, the guy everybody wanted to be like, who took fishing just seriously enough, knew everything there was to know inshore, offshore and in fresh water—and yet who never greeted a broken line or a slipped knot with anything but a grin and a joke.

    He had no apparent ego about his work, though he was one of the best ever at conveying the intricacies of light tackle fishing—many of the tactics which he helped develop.

    The very first time I was welcomed into that close fraternity of regular Florida Sportsman writers was nearly my last, I must admit. After dinner at Port of the Islands, a covey of the world’s finest outdoors writers were in Dunaway’s suite, rigging up for tomorrow’s exploits on the Fakka Union and surrounding bays for snook, tarpon and other fish that for me until then had been only creatures of dreams. Lefty Kreh was there. Mark Sosin was there. Herb Allen was there. Mr. Dunaway was there—and so was a kid from Homosassa who had three published fishing articles to his name.

    Dunaway was a knot- tying fan most of his life, inventor of the Uniknot that is among the most widely used fishing knots in existence, and he was fanatical about building the perfect leader that would not slip or break at the knot when under maximum stress from the giant fish he regularly caught on amazingly light gear.

    Vic tied a Bimini Twist in his spinning tackle that evening, which was the key allowing him and the other experts to land jumbo fish on light monofilament line—the doubled line created by the knot gave 100 percent line strength on the line to leader connection.

    The only problem was that every Bimini took about five minutes to tie—the knot had to be rolled back over on itself with just the right amount of pressure to function. You then secured it with a couple of half-hitches and if you had an extra pair of hands available, they were employed to nip the tag end while the knot was still under pressure.

    Because I was the guy sitting closest, Dunaway asked me to trim the knot.

    To which I responded by nipping the running line into the Bimini rather than the tag end! (Jeez, it all looked so complicated!)

    My move brought a hoot of laughter from the assembled majesty of the fishing world, but Dunaway laughed loudest. Those guys for years afterwards never let me forget whacking off Vic’s knot—but every one of them went on to help me in some way.

    It was Vic who called to tell me that Herb Allen, for 20 years the outdoors editor of the Tampa Tribune, was retiring, and that he thought I should try for the job. It was a call that changed the rest of my life.

    Vic was the guy who largely popularized light tackle flats fishing in Florida for the first generation to take an interest in it. Along with a dozen or so other top anglers and guides between Miami and Key West, Vic pioneered catching bonefish, permit, redfish, tarpon and snook by fishing waters barely knee-deep, at a time when the rest of Florida had no idea the fish were there, or that they could be caught on spindly 8-pound-test spinning tackle or even fly rods.

    His column, “A Waterfront View”, ran virtually forever in Florida Sportsman Magazine, and made Vienna sausages a running joke among saltwater anglers to this day. He was author of a number of books, one of which, “Baits, Rigs and Tackle” sold some 300,000 copies.

    Vic asked that his ashes be spread off Cape Sable in the Everglades and that there be no formal service other than a gathering of family, according to Karl Wickstrom.
    Live music 7 nights a week: http://www.terrafermata.com/_events
  • ontheedge5658ontheedge5658 Posts: 2,662 Captain
    R.I.P. Mr Vic
  • magotmagot Posts: 6,640 Officer
    Growing up in Miami, I used to read his column in the Herald before there was a FS. Talking sixties. Baits, Rigs, and Tackle may be the best book ever written.
    RIP, Vic.
  • ziffleziffle Posts: 147 Deckhand
    Thank you Vic for signing your book for me many years ago at the FS show in Jacksonville and thank you for making me laugh for so many years with your Waterfront View stories. RIP
  • Mackeral SnatcherMackeral Snatcher Posts: 10,472 AG
    Waterfront View was some funny writing.
    RIP Vic
    THERE SHOULD BE NO COMMERCIAL FISHING ALLOWED FOR ANY SPECIES THAT IS CONSIDERED OVERFISHED.
  • PONCEPONCE Posts: 5,943 Officer
    Sad news, Vic did alot for the fishing industry and the preservation of our state fisheries RIP sir:angel:angel
  • AC ManAC Man Posts: 3,859 Captain
    tankard wrote: »
    I will hoist a can of Vienna Sausages in his honor.

    RIP

    X2
  • TrooplynchTrooplynch Posts: 19 Greenhorn
    Rest in Peace.
    TroopLynch
  • frankfrank Posts: 12,733 AG
    he was kind enough to sign this for me for my wife at a fs show
    vic.jpg 70.9K
    No political signature
  • Angler719Angler719 CrawfordvillePosts: 526 Officer
    From Santiago Chile, I raise my Pisco sour to you! God rest your soul on the bonefish flats of the Florida Keys!
  • nole76nole76 Posts: 802 Officer
    Sad to hear. When I was a kid he wrote the fishing/outdoors column for the local mullet wrapper. I used to go grab the paper out of the front yard and turn straight to his page.
    He was a big reason I developed a love for fishing and the outdoors.
  • 72soa72soa Posts: 314 Officer
    He had a good long life.
  • Bruce LBBruce LB Posts: 3,604 Captain
    RIP.
  • Pescatoral PursuitPescatoral Pursuit Posts: 5,065 Admiral
    When I was a budding young fisherman in Miami in the early 80's and had a subscription to FS magazine, the first article I would always turn to was Vic's. I had long forgotten why, to this day I always pick up a few cans of "Vinnys" with saltines before each fishing trip.

    RIP, Mr. Dunaway.
    cuda-title2_zpsb81e4f1d.jpg
    greggl wrote: »
    Strive for self-sacrificial levels of empathy and sympathy. We are only set free by becoming the scapegoat, or sin eater', rather than picking a target and 'throwing stones.'
    nuevowavo wrote:
    Think you're pretty clever? Think again. Time for a break.
    :rotflmao
  • stringlestringle Posts: 462 Officer
    Another one here that grew up reading Mr Vic...rest in peace.
  • Pescatoral PursuitPescatoral Pursuit Posts: 5,065 Admiral
    I doubt he was a forum member, but I certainly can't think of Florida Sportsman without thinking of him. As a kid growing up in Miami in the 70's and
    80's. I couldn't wait for the next issue of FS to hit the magazine rack, and as soon as I got it, would race past Wickstrom's latest sermon to read what crazy, silly, informative topic Dunaway had chosen to write about.

    He is missed.
    cuda-title2_zpsb81e4f1d.jpg
    greggl wrote: »
    Strive for self-sacrificial levels of empathy and sympathy. We are only set free by becoming the scapegoat, or sin eater', rather than picking a target and 'throwing stones.'
    nuevowavo wrote:
    Think you're pretty clever? Think again. Time for a break.
    :rotflmao
  • cprcpr Posts: 9,292 Admiral
    I doubt he was a forum member, but I certainly can't think of Florida Sportsman without thinking of him. As a kid growing up in Miami in the 70's and
    80's. I couldn't wait for the next issue of FS to hit the magazine rack, and as soon as I got it, would race past Wickstrom's latest sermon to read what crazy, silly, informative topic Dunaway had chosen to write about.

    He is missed.

    His books are a great resource.
    "The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time, and still retain the ability to function." F. Scott Fitzgerald

    "Prediction is very difficult, especially if it's about the future." Niels Bohr
  • hittin'_bottomhittin'_bottom Posts: 178 Officer
    A couple years back I went to a FS fishing show and had him autograph a can of Vienna sausage.

    He laughed as he signed it and said, "one day these will go bad, so you better eat them soon."

    Still have that signed can on a shelf next to my fishing books.
    I've upped my standards, now up yours!!!
  • BluebirdBluebird Posts: 126 Officer
    Perfect place to choose to be laid to rest. Twas a great life Vic!
  • Frank JigFrank Jig Posts: 58 Deckhand
    Oh man... that stinks...

    I took Vic fly fishing in VA Beach.
    It was the first time he had seen redfish stacked like cordwood and hitting surface flies at night.
    Every cast, he'd get hit and every time he would say "I can't believe this, I can't believe this..."
    We had a ball...He told me to come down and fish with him but I always put it off...
    Rest in Peace my friend.
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